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posted by Dopefish on Tuesday February 18 2014, @12:30PM   Printer-friendly
from the freedom-is-not-free dept.

combatserver writes:

"While The Guardian and The New York Times reported on the NSA targeting of data leaked by popular mobile apps, independent sources produced highly-detailed articles--accompanied by source material--that paint a much broader picture of NSA capabilities and intent. Recent restrictions imposed on journalists--a result of corporate influence, editorial decisions, and threats against journalists--combined with the ease of establishing a website, might be driving a new era in journalism.

The Intercept recently announced a shift towards independent reporting with the creation of their own news outlet, free of the constraints imposed on journalists by 'Big Media' and governments. Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Jeremy Scahill have joined forces to provide the world with an alternative, perhaps blazing a path towards a fundamental change in how news is reported and distributed. SoylentNews can play a significant role in this shift towards journalistic freedom--we share many common core-ideals, and can give voice to independent news sources.

The Big Question: How will 'Big Media' and governments react to this shift in journalism?"

 
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  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by martyb on Tuesday February 18 2014, @12:55PM

    by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday February 18 2014, @12:55PM (#1566) Journal

    From TFS:

    The Big Question: How will 'Big Media' and governments react to this shift in journalism?"

    The obvious answer is: poorly.

    They may attempt to impose restrictions. They may attempt to harass whatever parties they can identify. There are many things they can attempt. But I suspect that all of such attempts will be somewhat ham-fisted and poorly implemented.

    In essence, they'd be trying to play whack-a-mole with various uncomfortable (to them) news sources. There is some value in that for them; the sooner the "opposition" can be "quieted", the smaller the audience available to the soapbox. OTOH, with the proliferation of twitter, facebook, instagram, etc., there is a real possibility that such sources could regain their audience quickly in the event of an attempt at quieting them.

    Case in point, see what happened when an old-time nerd news site tried to quiet a boycott; people found another way to communicate.

    OT: It has been a real joy for me to see the discussions here blossom into the wonderfulness that I remember way back when. I lurked on /. from the time before they even had UIDs, there. We're part of history folks. Hats off to all who made SN possible! Ditto to all who contribute their insightful and humorous commentary to these stories.

    --
    Wit is intellect, dancing.
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  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by FatPhil on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:27PM

    by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:27PM (#1583) Homepage

    OT: but beware newlywed syndrome. We don't want everyone going "wow, I'm so happy!" for 2 weeks, posting way more than ever, and then getting bored and tired after the honeymoon period. We need staying power.

    --
    Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
    • (Score: 1) by martyb on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:39PM

      by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:39PM (#1591) Journal

      OT: but beware newlywed syndrome. We don't want everyone going "wow, I'm so happy!" for 2 weeks, posting way more than ever, and then getting bored and tired after the honeymoon period. We need staying power.

      Excellent observation; point well taken. Thanks for the feedback!

      --
      Wit is intellect, dancing.
    • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Thexalon on Tuesday February 18 2014, @03:48PM

      by Thexalon (636) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @03:48PM (#1661)

      I'm not too concerned about that: As long as everyone's having fun commenting, that creates site content, which creates more users, which creates the momentum to have staying power. Plus I've always wanted a 3-digit UID.

      Some of the milestones that might be worth watching include:
      - Stories per day
      - Comment count of stories on front page

      If we get to the point where either or both of these numbers exceed that Other News for Nerds, I'll consider our revolt at least viable.

      --
      The only thing that stops a bad guy with a compiler is a good guy with a compiler.
      • (Score: 1) by hemocyanin on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:26PM

        by hemocyanin (186) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:26PM (#1682) Journal

        Me too, but it will take a decade before it is ubercool.

    • (Score: 1) by gottabeme on Tuesday February 18 2014, @08:46PM

      by gottabeme (1531) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @08:46PM (#1896)

      I agree. I think perhaps the most important thing we can do is to find good stories and submit them with good summaries.

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by dilbert on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:56PM

    by dilbert (444) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:56PM (#1603)
    I agree with your assertion the government will react poorly, but I think an equally important question is "How will people ordinary people react?". Since 'The Intercept' will initially be focusing their reporting on the Snowden files, I'll focus my comments here on the same story. I'm deeply concerned about the egregious privacy violations the NSA and for-profit corporations have been pursuing. I've been following the story since it broke last June. I've changed many of my computing behaviors and advocated for my friends and family to do the same, but nobody seems to care. For example, I wanted to start encrypting all my emails, but my family would never be able to use encryption. To counter this, since the majority of my family emails only other family members, I rolled my own mailserver knowing that since most emails wouldn't leave the box (and using SSL between the browser and webmail client), the emails wouldn't be unencrypted on the wire to be sniffed, or ready to be subpoena or data-mined from/by the corporations. People in my family tried it out for a few days, but none of them are currently using the server (some haven't even logged in more than once). They're content to use gmail/outlook/yahoo. The 'cost' of updating their contacts with a new email address is too great! Besides, they have nothing to hide, right? So it's great that Greenwald/Poitras/Scahill are doing this type of reporting, but so what? Normal people don't care about things they perceive are too abstract/scary/whatever. Is this type of journalism going to be read by the vast majority of people? If they do stumble across it will they care? It makes me sad, but I doubt it.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 18 2014, @06:34PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 18 2014, @06:34PM (#1786)

      I feel your pain. Maybe buy them all personal emails at neomailbox.ch (or whatever), then set their current email addresses to forward everything to neomailbox, and reply only via neomailbox; over time, stop using their current emails? Good luck.