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posted by LaminatorX on Thursday February 20 2014, @01:25AM   Printer-friendly
from the somebody-call-in-Enoch-Root dept.

Thexalon writes:

"University of Bedfordshire professor and applied linguist Stephen Bax has decoded 10 words of the baffling Voynich Manuscript. He focused on proper names that would match the accompanying drawings, which allowed him to find similar drawings in other books of the period."

 
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  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by combatserver on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:02AM

    by combatserver (38) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:02AM (#3064)

    I had come across the voynich.nu website years ago when doing some research for a short story idea I was working on--I was instantly intrigued. Was this some elaborate hoax? Was there anything in the document that could verify it's authenticity? And more importantly, WTF is the dude writing about?

    It is that last question that really got me thinking--was there anything that could be discerned when viewing the work as a whole? It seems to me that there were a few obvious--and some not-so-obvious--subjects that might explain the sum total of the manuscript, but two stood out for me.

    The first thought I had was that the author/illustrator was simply mentally ill and had documented his perceptions and ideas in the form of a manuscript. It wouldn't have been the first time such a thing has happened, nor the last.

    The second possible explanation that occurred to me was that the manuscript was a description of the "Paradise" described as the destination for the "faithful" in Muslim teachings. Perhaps this is a description/travelogue of what "paradise" would be like--virgins (lots!), botanical descriptions of plant-life (no plants in Paradise, you say?) and maybe even celestial map-markers for finding "paradise"

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  • (Score: 4, Funny) by combatserver on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:04AM

    by combatserver (38) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:04AM (#3065)

    Period.

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:27AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:27AM (#3124)

    The second possible explanation that occurred to me was that the manuscript was a description of the "Paradise" described as the destination for the "faithful" in Muslim teachings.

    I think it would be in Arabic if that were the case. In the early spread of Islam, a manuscript wouldn't have been created because it was all about military conquest and power consolidation in Arabia. By the time Islam was established and had its golden age of literacy, Arabic was established as the proper language for such things, right?

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by combatserver on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:56AM

      by combatserver (38) on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:56AM (#3213)

      "I think it would be in Arabic if that were the case."

      It almost appears to be a combination of western characters and Arabic..

      http://www.canadianarabcommunity.com/arabiclanguag e.php [canadianar...munity.com]

      compared to the "Currier's Hands" section of this page...

      http://www.voynich.nu/writing.html [voynich.nu]

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    • (Score: 1) by tibman on Friday February 21 2014, @02:13AM

      by tibman (134) Subscriber Badge on Friday February 21 2014, @02:13AM (#3989)

      Arabic is also written right to left but this manuscript appears to be left to right.

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