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posted by martyb on Friday October 21 2016, @12:49PM   Printer-friendly
from the information-wants-to-be-free? dept.

Federal prosecutors have charged former NSA contractor Harold T. Martin III under the Espionage Act:

Harold T. Martin III is expected to appear at a federal courthouse in Baltimore on Friday for a hearing to consider whether he should remain in U.S. custody, as prosecutors announced in a court filing that they plan to file Espionage Act charges against him.

The FBI is investigating whether Martin may have transferred six bankers boxes' worth of paper documents and 50,000 gigabytes of electronic materials to anyone else, according to documents filed Thursday. So far, investigators said they have not found any connection to a foreign power. Martin's public defenders, James Wyda and Deborah Boardman, have said that he presents no flight risk and that "there's no evidence he intended to betray his country."

Martin, a former Navy reservist, has been in federal custody since late August. That's when FBI agents executed search warrants at his suburban Maryland home, uncovering what they describe as "overwhelming" proof he mishandled classified information. Among the materials they found: the personal information of government employees and a top-secret document "regarding specific operational plans against a known enemy of the United States and its allies," according to the court filing.

The trove of information reportedly includes hacking tools that were recently offered for sale by a group that calls itself The Shadow Brokers.

12-page court filing: United States of America v. Harold T. Martin, III

Previously:
NSA Contractor Harold Martin III Arrested
Probe of Leaked U.S. NSA Hacking Tools Examines Operative's ‘Mistake’


Original Submission

 
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  • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @12:54PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @12:54PM (#417215)

    Sounds like he would make a great presidential candidate!

    • (Score: 2, Flamebait) by isostatic on Friday October 21 2016, @01:57PM

      by isostatic (365) on Friday October 21 2016, @01:57PM (#417238) Journal

      Only if he's a sex offender too

      • (Score: 1, Flamebait) by Runaway1956 on Friday October 21 2016, @02:03PM

        by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Friday October 21 2016, @02:03PM (#417247) Homepage Journal

        So, which offensive sex acts would qualify him the most? Necrophilia? Bestiality? Surely you wouldn't have us accept some mundane kiddy diddling.

        --
        "no more than 8 bullets in a round" - Joe Biden
        • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @02:31PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @02:31PM (#417263)

          he could fuck dead underage goats

        • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @03:15PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @03:15PM (#417279)

          So, which offensive sex acts would qualify him the most?

          Indoctrinating children in to the magic sky fairy club. For some reason Americans love that form of child molestation.

          • (Score: 0, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @03:23PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @03:23PM (#417283)

            Indoctrinating children in to the magic sky fairy club. For some reason Americans love that form of child molestation.

            In fairness, many of the club's members actually frown on fairies. I think they prefer to refer to their magic sky fairy as a magic sky wizard.

            • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @05:43PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @05:43PM (#417332)

              Indoctrinating children in to the magic sky fairy club. For some reason Americans love that form of child molestation.

              In fairness, many of the club's members actually frown on fairies. I think they prefer to refer to their magic sky fairy as a magic sky wizard.

              He's still a magic sky guy in a dress.

              • (Score: 3, Funny) by mhajicek on Friday October 21 2016, @07:12PM

                by mhajicek (51) on Friday October 21 2016, @07:12PM (#417373)

                I once met him. He wasn't white and fluffy. He just had sideburns.

                --
                The spacelike surfaces of time foliations can have a cusp at the surface of discontinuity. - P. Hajicek
  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @01:15PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @01:15PM (#417219)
    Imagine what might have happened if they had the backdoors they wanted. There are certainly spies inside the NSA, and not all of them have Edward Snowden's principles. A master key to the backdoors would have certainly fallen into the hands of foreign intelligence agencies and criminals very quickly.
  • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @01:31PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @01:31PM (#417225)

    Why is stealing in quotes? This seems to suggest the submitter and/or editor does not think this constitutes stealing.

    • (Score: 4, Informative) by The Mighty Buzzard on Friday October 21 2016, @01:50PM

      Dunno why takyon did it but I would have because you can't by definition steal something and also leave it in the place that you found it. Same as copyright infringement is not theft, this is not theft.

      Words have meanings. They are not open to reinterpretation to suit whoever decides another definition would suit them better.

      --
      My rights don't end where your fear begins.
      • (Score: 3, Informative) by tangomargarine on Friday October 21 2016, @02:27PM

        by tangomargarine (667) on Friday October 21 2016, @02:27PM (#417261)

        But he took boxes of papers. We're talking physical stealing *in addition to* the data.

        --
        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
      • (Score: 0, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @02:53PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @02:53PM (#417270)

        By definition, stealing means taking that which does not belong to you without permission of the owner.

        So "copyright infringement" and downloading confidential data both qualify as stealing.

        It's the Napster/Torrent crowd that worked on redefining what "stealing" meant in the Internet age. Sorry, the original definition is still perfectly suitable.

        • (Score: 2) by The Mighty Buzzard on Friday October 21 2016, @03:10PM

          You may want to look up the definition of taking then. If something remains right where it was, you have not taken it.

          --
          My rights don't end where your fear begins.
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @04:31PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @04:31PM (#417304)

            In general I agree with your statement that digital "theft" as described by RIAA/MPAA is not theft as such. However, classified information is a bit different by nature of what it entails.

            To make a purely hypothetical example, imagine there was a flaw with Windows 10 where if you plug in a USB stick with a special program on it, you could bypass security and grab everything in the Documents folder of all users. If this information gets out, everybody will fix the flaw which would deprive the NSA the ability to use this flaw.

            So in this case, the person has taken the (intellectual) property and has deprived the original owners of its usage... so it is actually literal theft.

            • (Score: 2) by mhajicek on Friday October 21 2016, @07:08PM

              by mhajicek (51) on Friday October 21 2016, @07:08PM (#417372)

              There is a USB stick commercially available for $20 that lets you completely pwn any windows box that isn't using full drive encryption. Linus Tech Tips reviewed it.

              --
              The spacelike surfaces of time foliations can have a cusp at the surface of discontinuity. - P. Hajicek
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @03:21PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @03:21PM (#417281)

          stealing means taking that which does not belong to you

          Following your reasoning, photographing someone == kidnapping.

          Copying -- making a duplicate but leaving the original intact -- is not stealing.

      • (Score: 4, Funny) by EvilSS on Friday October 21 2016, @05:18PM

        by EvilSS (1456) Subscriber Badge on Friday October 21 2016, @05:18PM (#417322)
        Well I'm sure his lawyer won't have any issue getting the case dismissed then, all he needs is a dictionary.
        • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @06:00PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @06:00PM (#417344)

          and a jury of insufferable pedants

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 22 2016, @01:59AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 22 2016, @01:59AM (#417494)

        If taking a copy of ip is not stealing how was the "original" in a place to start with.

        Internet logic.

    • (Score: 2, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @01:59PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @01:59PM (#417242)
      It's not stealing. He was just transferring it to his home server. No worries, you can't get prosecuted for that.
      • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @02:22PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @02:22PM (#417260)

        Yes, but you have to remember to wipe it with a cloth. If they find any dust on the thing, you're in deep trouble!

    • (Score: 2, Redundant) by wonkey_monkey on Friday October 21 2016, @03:21PM

      by wonkey_monkey (279) on Friday October 21 2016, @03:21PM (#417282) Homepage

      Does the person who owns it still have it? Then it's (arguably) not stealing.

      --
      systemd is Roko's Basilisk
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 22 2016, @07:46AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 22 2016, @07:46AM (#417549)
      Maybe it's a direct quote from a source. Not all quotes are scare quotes you know.
  • (Score: 2) by Username on Friday October 21 2016, @06:07PM

    by Username (4557) on Friday October 21 2016, @06:07PM (#417346)

    You would think their security would be a little more wound up after Snowden. I’m surprised they just let the guy walk out of the building with six banker boxes of paper and 48TB of data which is about 30ish some tapes or drives.

    • (Score: 1) by tftp on Saturday October 22 2016, @05:33AM

      by tftp (806) on Saturday October 22 2016, @05:33AM (#417529) Homepage

      I’m surprised they just let the guy walk out of the building with six banker boxes of paper and 48TB of data

      A lot of stuff enters and leaves a large office building every single day. It's like an airport... the passengers empty their pockets, and the TSA checks their water bottles with a magnifying glass. At the same time the gates in the back of the fence are wide open, and in come huge trucks loaded with jet fuel, oil, food, airplane parts and tools, flight plans and maps, desks and chairs, rolls of carpet and cans of paint, sacks of concrete and sheets of glass... is it humanly possible to inspect all that volume of goods? It is not. But like the proverbial drunk who lost his keys, the TSA keeps looking under the streetlight because it is easier to search there.

      • (Score: 2) by Username on Saturday October 22 2016, @08:06PM

        by Username (4557) on Saturday October 22 2016, @08:06PM (#417646)

        Well, I’d think, if were going with the TSA analogy, a guy carrying an ak-47 through the front door of an airport would be easy to spot. Pretty much begs the questions, what are you doing with that ak? Similar to a guy carrying banker boxes through NSA check points all the way out to his car.

        • (Score: 1) by tftp on Saturday October 22 2016, @09:36PM

          by tftp (806) on Saturday October 22 2016, @09:36PM (#417663) Homepage

          Similar to a guy carrying banker boxes through NSA check points all the way out to his car.

          Pray tell, why would he need to steal the bankers boxes themselves? A pack of twelve costs only $40 [staples.com]. What he needed is papers that go inside. Papers are not magnetic; they are light and thin. How many sheets could the perpetrator carry under his jacket, day after day after day? Fifty? A hundred? It won't take long to fill those boxes, especially if he also left the building for lunch, and for doctor's appointments, and for other reasons...

          It's also possible that some of these papers he printed himself, at home, from a USB Flash disk or a DVD. Again, it would require a search to find those on him. He wouldn't be searched without a serious suspicion.

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Zz9zZ on Friday October 21 2016, @06:42PM

    by Zz9zZ (1348) on Friday October 21 2016, @06:42PM (#417359)

    I don't this man's specific motives, but when the government is so screwed up and run by gigantic corporations; well you will have defectors. Either he didn't care about screwing over his own country because they are so terrible, or he saw a potential to make some money which was greater than his loyalty.

    Perhaps if we didn't have such fucked up secrets to hide then the people would actually be proud of their country and not want to sell it out. Our "leaders" are just so stupid, but it is the worst kind of stupid. They are actually very capable and "smart", but they choose to use their abilities in the stupidest ways while thinking themselves clever.

    --
    ~Tilting at windmills~
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @09:26PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 21 2016, @09:26PM (#417430)

      I read somewhere that he copied/stole stuff because he was a plain 'ol digital-packrat. Always collecting stuff because of some perceived value and it made him feel better.
      Not letting him off the hook mind you, it's just that he had this stuff for soooo long and did nothing with it, has no motivations for selling the stuff or gaining advantages. Just plain stupid for collecting such material is about it.

      • (Score: 2) by Zz9zZ on Tuesday October 25 2016, @04:42AM

        by Zz9zZ (1348) on Tuesday October 25 2016, @04:42AM (#418401)

        Interesting, I wonder if he had more motivation than simple hoarding syndrome.

        --
        ~Tilting at windmills~