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posted by martyb on Wednesday April 05 2017, @02:38PM   Printer-friendly
from the no-itsy-bitsy-spider dept.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee gave an interview with radio station WBUR about the state of the Web and its future:

Berners-Lee initially imagined the web as a beautiful platform that could help us overcome national and cultural boundaries. He envisioned it would break down silos, but many people today believe the web has created silos.

And he still largely sees the potential of the web, but the web has not turned out to be the complete cyber Utopian dream he had hoped. He's particularly worried about the dark side of social media — places where he says anonymity is being used by "misogynist bullies, by nasty people who just get a kick out of being nasty."

He also identified personal data privacy, the spread of misinformation, and a lack of transparency in online political advertising as major problems with the current Web in a letter marking the World Wide Web's 28th birthday last month.

Previously: World Wide Web Turns 25 years Old
Tim Berners-Lee Proposes an Online Magna Carta
Berners-Lee on HTML 5: If It's Not on the Web, It Doesn't Exist
The First Website Went Online 25 Years Ago
Berners-Lee: World Wide Web is Spy Net
Tim Berners-Lee Just Gave us an Opening to Stop DRM in Web Standards


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  • (Score: 2) by Scruffy Beard 2 on Wednesday April 05 2017, @03:55PM (2 children)

    by Scruffy Beard 2 (6030) on Wednesday April 05 2017, @03:55PM (#489184)

    Apparently from ~HTML 2.0 - 4.01, HTML was SGML [wikipedia.org]

    HTML was theoretically an example of an SGML-based language until HTML 5, which admits that browsers cannot parse it as SGML (for compatibility reasons) and codifies exactly what they must do instead.

    DocBook SGML and LinuxDoc are better examples, as they were used almost exclusively with actual SGML tools.

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 05 2017, @05:39PM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 05 2017, @05:39PM (#489236)

    Codify existing practice.

    The C++ committee has learned this the hard way, especially after the `export' keyword debacle. Most real-world things have to exist before they can be standardized.

    • (Score: 2) by kaszz on Friday April 07 2017, @11:01PM

      by kaszz (4211) on Friday April 07 2017, @11:01PM (#490591) Journal

      The alternative is to do things right from the start by thinking it through. And then write a really good standard from that.