Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by LaminatorX on Saturday February 22 2014, @02:30AM   Printer-friendly
from the it's-all-relative dept.

martyb writes:

"Scientists have discovered a pulsar (with an estimated mass of between 1.4 and 2 solar masses) traveling at an estimated 2.5 to 5 million mph (0.0035c to 0.007c). According to NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory:

Originally discovered with the European Space Agency satellite INTEGRAL, the pulsar is located about 60 light-years away from the center of the supernova remnant SNR MSH 11-61A in the constellation of Carina. Its implied speed is between 2.5 million and 5 million mph, making it one of the fastest pulsars ever observed.

By comparison, one of the fastest man-made objects is the Voyager-1 spacecraft, currently traveling at an estimated 38,100 mph relative to the sun, or approximately 0.000056c (5.6 x 10-5 c)."

 
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 2, Informative) by Daniel Dvorkin on Saturday February 22 2014, @03:12PM

    by Daniel Dvorkin (1099) on Saturday February 22 2014, @03:12PM (#4833) Journal

    It doesn't mention asymmetry in the article on pulsars, but it does in the article on supernovas [wikipedia.org]. Looks like the cause is somewhat mysterious, but the phenomenon is well-known.

    --
    Pipedot [pipedot.org]:Soylent [soylentnews.org]::BSD:Linux
    Starting Score:    1  point
    Moderation   +1  
       Informative=1, Total=1
    Extra 'Informative' Modifier   0  

    Total Score:   2  
  • (Score: 1) by martyb on Saturday February 22 2014, @04:13PM

    by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Saturday February 22 2014, @04:13PM (#4860) Journal

    Daniel Dvorkin (1099) wrote:

    It doesn't mention asymmetry in the article on pulsars, but it does in the article on supernovas [wikipedia.org]. Looks like the cause is somewhat mysterious, but the phenomenon is well-known.

    Huh! Well how about that! Thanks for passing along that link - that's what I love about this site! I learn something new every day!

    --
    Wit is intellect, dancing.