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posted by janrinok on Sunday June 01 2014, @02:59PM   Printer-friendly
from the it-keeps-getting-more-complicated dept.

Zilong Li and Cosimo Bambi with Fudan University in Shanghai have come up with a very novel idea--those black holes that are believed to exist at the center of a lot of galaxies, may instead by wormholes. They've written a paper [abstract], uploaded to the preprint server arXiv, describing their idea and how what they've imagined could be proved right (or wrong) by a new instrument soon to be added to an observatory in Chile.

From the article:

Back in 1974, space scientists discovered Sagittarius A* (SgrA*) - bright source of radio waves emanating from what appeared to be near the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Subsequent study of the object led scientists to believe that it was (and is) a black hole - the behavior of stars nearby, for example, suggested it was something massive and extremely dense.

What we're able to see when we look at SgrA* are plasma gasses near the event horizon, not the object itself as light cannot escape. That should be true for wormholes too, of course, which have also been theorized to exist by the Theory of General Relativity. Einstein even noted the possibility of their existence. Unfortunately, no one has ever come close to proving the existence of wormholes, which are believed to be channels between different parts of the universe, or even between two universes in multi-universe theories. In their paper, Li and Bambi suggest that there is compelling evidence suggesting that many of the objects we believe to be black holes at the center of galaxies, may in fact be wormholes.

Plasma gases orbiting a black hole versus a wormhole should look different to us, the pair suggest, because wormholes should be a lot smaller. Plus, the presence of wormholes would help explain how it is that even new galaxies have what are now believed to be black holes - such large black holes would presumably take a long time to become so large, so how can they exist in a new galaxy? They can't Li and Bambi conclude, instead those objects are actually wormholes, which theory suggests could spring up in an instant, and would have, following the Big Bang.

 
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  • (Score: 2) by rts008 on Monday June 02 2014, @12:12AM

    by rts008 (3001) on Monday June 02 2014, @12:12AM (#50038)

    A wormhole is not a shimmery magical door, or a swirly tear in spacetime. If you're looking at the input side of it, a wormhole looks pretty much exactly like a black hole. A wormhole is a black hole that goes somewhere. A black hole is a wormhole without the other side.

    I have to ask where the info you are presenting here is coming from?
    IIRC, all of that is still in the hypothesis and theory stage.

    When did we send probes or astronauts into wormholes and black holes...and get data/information back out? If we did, it is news to me!!
    And when did this occur and who did this wonderous thing that should be the news of the century? (all I see is this article proposing a hypothesis on wormholes possible existence)

    I don't think you need Hollywood's astrophysics expertise, you seem quite imaginative enough on your own.

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  • (Score: 2) by geb on Monday June 02 2014, @08:04AM

    by geb (529) on Monday June 02 2014, @08:04AM (#50118)

    Wormholes are one class of solutions to the equations of general relativity. That is where the idea originally came from. That is where our descriptions of them are derived from. Even though they probably don't exist, we know quite well what they would look like if they did.