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posted by martyb on Sunday October 01 2017, @09:23PM   Printer-friendly
from the progress++ dept.

AMD's high Ryzen sales may have convinced the company to release a new version on a slightly improved process in Spring 2018:

AMD has informed its partners that it plans to launch in February 2018 an upgrade version of its Ryzen series processors built using a 12nm low-power (12LP) process at Globalfoundries, according to sources at motherboard makers.

The company will initially release the CPUs codenamed Pinnacle 7, followed by mid-range Pinnacle 5 and entry-level Pinnacle 3 processors in March 2018, the sources disclosed. AMD is also expected to see its share of the desktop CPU market return to 30% in the first half of 2018.

AMD will launch the low-power version of Pinnacle processors in April 2018 and the enterprise version Pinnacle Pro in May 2018.

The new "Pinnacle Ridge" chips appear to be part of a Zen 1 refresh rather than "Zen 2", which is expected to ship in 2019 on a 7nm process. The 12nm Leading-Performance (12LP) process was described by GlobalFoundries as providing 15% greater circuit density and a 10% performance increase compared to its 14nm FinFET process.

AMD has yet to release 14nm "Raven Ridge" CPUs for laptops.

Also at Wccftech. HPCwire article about the 12LP process.

Previously: AMD Ryzen Launch News
AMD's Ryzen Could be Forcing Intel to Release "Coffee Lake" CPUs Sooner
AMD Ryzen 3 Reviewed


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 02 2017, @07:33AM (7 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 02 2017, @07:33AM (#575798)

    You'll note that NOBODY cares.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 02 2017, @07:54AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 02 2017, @07:54AM (#575806)

    Sunday = slowday

  • (Score: 4, Touché) by Jesus_666 on Monday October 02 2017, @10:13AM (5 children)

    by Jesus_666 (3044) on Monday October 02 2017, @10:13AM (#575835)
    Of course nobody cares. We all just bought a Ryzen CPU when they came out and it's way too early for an upgrade.
    • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 02 2017, @10:46AM (4 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 02 2017, @10:46AM (#575847)

      Create a 200 dollar sku with a PSP that can be either jumpered or efused into unsigned/user signed firmware mode, and sell it to the 'control our own computers' crowd.

      Unlike the TALOS II, this would actually have a chance of netting significant sales, since 200 dollars would put it as an impulse buy for privacy conscious individuals, whereas the TALOS II is more like a mid-range used car purchase for the average middle class westerner.

      Sadly I don't think AMD is visionary enough to do such a thing, especially after they just pushed out a GPU with almost fully signed firmware (the Vega series), the only benefit to which over Nvidia's signing is that they left an unsigned block for (some?) overclocking values.

      Unfortunately, not being able to trust the firmware, and not being able to reverse engineer or replace the firmware makes both Ryzen and Vega+ GPUs a non-starter for me, and many other privacy conscious/libre oriented individuals. I can only hope somebody makes a splash into the market to compete with the big three who will challenge these assumptions that look more like corporate collusion/an oligarchy.

      • (Score: 2) by sgleysti on Monday October 02 2017, @01:20PM (2 children)

        by sgleysti (56) Subscriber Badge on Monday October 02 2017, @01:20PM (#575880)

        the TALOS II is more like a mid-range used car purchase for the average middle class westerner.

        And that's not an exaggeration. $4610 for their default single processor desktop configuration (16GB ECC ram, 500GB NVMe SSD). The board and processor are $4050 of that price, and I don't see integrated graphics listed anywhere.

        not being able to trust the firmware, and not being able to reverse engineer or replace the firmware makes both Ryzen and Vega+ GPUs a non-starter for me

        I've heard that Intel has its own problems in this regard. What do you use for a computer?

        • (Score: 2) by LoRdTAW on Monday October 02 2017, @03:02PM (1 child)

          by LoRdTAW (3755) on Monday October 02 2017, @03:02PM (#575919) Journal

          I've heard that Intel has its own problems in this regard. What do you use for a computer?

          Neither company had such problems up until a decade or so ago. A Raspberry Pi or other open Arm platform might be a better choice right now if "open computing" is a major concern.

          • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Monday October 02 2017, @09:52PM

            by JoeMerchant (3937) on Monday October 02 2017, @09:52PM (#576232)

            Fitting, since a RaspberryPi is _almost_ as good as a regular computer from 10 years ago.

            --
            🌻🌻 [google.com]
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 02 2017, @04:56PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 02 2017, @04:56PM (#575974)

        they don't have much vision or understanding in regards to freedom. they think their customers are all a bunch of ignorant windows gamer slaves. same thing with their workstation customers. the big dumb corps that they do business with supposedly don't care about Free drivers, etc. dumb ass amd doesn't understand that these big slow corps are just behind the 8ball (like all big dumb corps) and that the future demands trust-able hardware.