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posted by martyb on Saturday October 28 2017, @01:28AM   Printer-friendly
from the next-up?-legalize-pans! dept.

64% of Americans now support the legalization of cannabis, an all-time high since Gallup first asked the question in 1969. Also for the first time, a majority of Republicans (51%) support legalization, up from 42% last year:

As efforts to legalize marijuana at the state level continue to yield successes, public opinion, too, has shifted toward greater support. The Department of Justice under the current Republican administration has been perceived as hostile to state-level legalization. But Attorney General Jeff Sessions could find himself out of step with his own party if the current trends continue. Rank-and-file Republicans' views on the issue have evolved just as Democrats' and independents' have, though Republicans remain least likely to support legalizing pot.

Also at NPR, The Hill, NORML, and Reason.

Related: New Attorney General Claims Legal Weed Drives Violent Crime; Statistics be Damned
4/20: The Third Time's Not the Charm


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  • (Score: 1, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Saturday October 28 2017, @09:43AM (2 children)

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Saturday October 28 2017, @09:43AM (#588622) Journal

    From your link, "The United States is not a direct democracy, in the sense of a country in which laws (and other government decisions) are made predominantly by majority vote."

    That puts paid to the Democrat's complaint that Hillary won the "popular vote", however they wish to define "popular vote". And, it most certainly ruins the idea that "we live in a democracy". In a real democracy, every vote is equally valued, and equally valuable. In a real democracy, whatever is popular becomes law. We live in a republic, in which the popular vote is kind of important, but the vote doesn't decide what law is. Even if a majority of residents in your town decide that a huge vacant lot should become an amusement park, they don't get that park unless a whole bunch of other hoops are jumped through. And, even then, the vote can be trumped by city council, because business and/or industry will likely generate more revenue for the city, than an amusement park.

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  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Whoever on Saturday October 28 2017, @03:47PM (1 child)

    by Whoever (4524) on Saturday October 28 2017, @03:47PM (#588703) Journal

    Did I claim we live in a direct democracy?

    You keep adding your own qualifiers to the definition of democracy and then say the the USA doesn't meet your definition. But it's your definition. It's not a definition of democracy.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 28 2017, @05:02PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 28 2017, @05:02PM (#588722)

      dude, first try to have clean elections. Only after that you can shout about how great your democracy is