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posted by janrinok on Friday December 22 2017, @11:02PM   Printer-friendly
from the that's-what-averages-do dept.

There were 42,249 deaths due to opioid overdoses in 2016, compared to a projected 41,070 deaths from breast cancer in 2017 (42,640 in 2015). U.S. life expectancy has dropped for the second year in a row:

The increase largely stemmed from the continued escalation of deaths from fentanyl and other synthetic opioids, which jumped to 19,410 in 2016 from 9,580 in 2015 and 5,540 in 2014, according to a TFAH analysis of the report.

[...] The surge in overdose deaths has depressed recent gains in U.S. life expectancy, which fell to an average age of 78.6, down 0.1 year from 2015 and marking the first two-year drop since 1962-1963.

In a separate report, the CDC linked the recent steep increases in hepatitis C infections to increases in opioid injection.

Researchers used a national database that tracks substance abuse admissions to treatment facilities in all 50 U.S. states. They found a 133 percent increase in acute hepatitis C cases that coincided with a 93 percent increase in admissions for opioid injection between 2004 to 2014.

From the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:


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  • (Score: 2) by takyon on Friday December 22 2017, @11:11PM (8 children)

    by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday December 22 2017, @11:11PM (#613436) Journal

    Let's get real ratchet up in this shit. I don't even know how to get heroin (obviously peak market penetration has not been reached yet). But I know where to get tramadol: anybody who hurts their toe and goes to a doctor for it.

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  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by VLM on Friday December 22 2017, @11:47PM (1 child)

    by VLM (445) on Friday December 22 2017, @11:47PM (#613447)

    anybody who hurts their toe and goes to a doctor for it.

    The other side of the coin is I go thru periods of weightlifting and being a flabby lazy bastard, and in one lazy bastard era, I screwed up my back and the urgent care doc was pretty useless until I convinced him I was completely uninterested in obtaining opiates and honestly wanted to figure out how to fix my back, at which point he perked way up and his motivation level went from about 2 to about 11, was actually kinda creepy. Total voice and attitude change. He cracked open some anatomy books to show me the exact muscle bundle I damaged, and gave me detailed treatment instructions, that ended up working 100%... You could tell the poor doc spent too much time arguing with addicts and he was very excited to have a genuine medical patient...

    In summary, if you want better medical service, unfortunately first you gotta convince the doc you're not a junkie looking for a fix.

    • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @07:42PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @07:42PM (#613670)

      Creepy? Someone gets interested in helping you once they find out you're not just trying to scam them? I call that amazing, wonderful, inspiring, hopeful. Pretty much everything other than creepy.

      You're dealing with human nature, when people get burned 90+ percent of the time they stop entering interactions with hope and interest.

      PS: please close your quote tags better.

  • (Score: 2) by Post-Nihilist on Friday December 22 2017, @11:47PM (2 children)

    by Post-Nihilist (5672) on Friday December 22 2017, @11:47PM (#613449)

    I had a problem with Tramadol many years ago. I was eating those pills like they were candies. I had a bag of 10000 pills brought in bulk from India to fulfill my addiction. I came to the realisation that I had to stop or die when I stopped to puke by the side of the road and briefly passing out (5s max) before getting back in the car to work. That night I flushed over 6000pills.

    Later in my life i tried o-desmethyltramadol while a decent opiate it did not have the unique buzz of Tramadol, a buzz that does not seems to be liked by the opiate users I asked about on usenet at the time.

    Alt.drugs.opiate or something like that...

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    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @04:54PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @04:54PM (#613638)

      You willingly smuggled illegal narcotics into the country. You were taking them specifically for the "unique buzz" of your drug of abuse. You continued until you recongized they were killing you and ran the possibility of killing another on the road. You quit cold turkey.

      This is why the rest of us do not see opiate addiction as a medical disease. It is a willpower problem. I watched a friend of a friend ruin her life with Fentanyl. She was a highly paid Nurse Anesthetist and has now lost her license. She has been clean for a year (peeing in a cup once every week) and quit cold turkey just like you. She will likely never get her license back, but is trying to get resinstated as a narcotics restricted RN. She is about to lose her house.

      I feel sorry for the family members affected by this horrible problem, but I have a hard time scraping up sympathy for the idiots poisoning themselves. They didn't just get hooked out of the blue. They started willingly, knowing the consequences of taking that first hit.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @03:18AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @03:18AM (#613517)

    I kinda liked tramadol. It put me in a good mood for social occasions, and I didn't abuse it otherwise. Now the Doctor won't prescribe it due to restrictions.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by julian on Saturday December 23 2017, @03:45AM (1 child)

      by julian (6003) on Saturday December 23 2017, @03:45AM (#613531)

      That's because Tramadol also has SSRI properties [wikipedia.org]. You were taking a social anxiety/depression medication.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @04:32AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @04:32AM (#613546)

        Yes. That was the reason for the Rx. Then I couldn't get refills anymore due to the schedule change a few years ago. And my new Doctor wouldn't prescribe it. I thought it was kind of a bummer, but as someone who is suspicious of happy pills (Brave New World made a big impression) I've made do without. It's all thanks to druggies, I guess. Can't say I have much sympathy.