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posted by janrinok on Friday December 22 2017, @11:02PM   Printer-friendly
from the that's-what-averages-do dept.

There were 42,249 deaths due to opioid overdoses in 2016, compared to a projected 41,070 deaths from breast cancer in 2017 (42,640 in 2015). U.S. life expectancy has dropped for the second year in a row:

The increase largely stemmed from the continued escalation of deaths from fentanyl and other synthetic opioids, which jumped to 19,410 in 2016 from 9,580 in 2015 and 5,540 in 2014, according to a TFAH analysis of the report.

[...] The surge in overdose deaths has depressed recent gains in U.S. life expectancy, which fell to an average age of 78.6, down 0.1 year from 2015 and marking the first two-year drop since 1962-1963.

In a separate report, the CDC linked the recent steep increases in hepatitis C infections to increases in opioid injection.

Researchers used a national database that tracks substance abuse admissions to treatment facilities in all 50 U.S. states. They found a 133 percent increase in acute hepatitis C cases that coincided with a 93 percent increase in admissions for opioid injection between 2004 to 2014.

From the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:


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  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @12:55AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 23 2017, @12:55AM (#613478)

    The side effects are awful:

    a. acclimation
    b. breathing trouble
    c. constipation
    d. drunk-like behavior

    For months afterward, the drug actually makes you hurt more. (thus the addiction)

    Alternatives:

    You could use ziconotide. It would be the perfect drug except for the fact that it needs to go in your back, even for non-back pain.

    You could get the ON-Q Infusion Pain Pump. That'll let you handle the pain with continuous local treatment.

    You could look for a new back surgeon. Perhaps there is something newer to try. Maybe you need replacement parts.

    Starting Score:    0  points
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