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posted by martyb on Thursday March 29 2018, @03:11PM   Printer-friendly
from the Windows-TCO dept.

A derivative of Microsoft Windows ransonware, Wannacry, has hit a Boeing production plant in Charleston, South Carolina. An internal memo from Mike VanderWel, chief engineer of Boeing Commercial Airplane production engineering, warned that the company's production systems and airline software were "at risk".

Wannacry was based on Microsoft Windows' CVE 2017-0144 which is used in the EternalBlue exploit kit. EternalBlue was initially utilized in apparent coordination with Microsoft's long delay in patching. Despite massive media spin, Wannacry was found to have hit all recent versions of Microsoft Windows.

From:
The Verge: Boeing production plant hit with WannaCry ransomware attack
The New York Times: Boeing Possibly Hit by ‘WannaCry’ Malware Attack
The Daily Express: Vital Boeing computer network INFECTED with WannaCry VIRUS - is it safe to fly?.

Previously: UK Blames North Korea for WannaCry Attacks, Says NHS Didn't Follow Cybersecurity Guidelines
WannaCry Ransomware Attack Linked to North Korea by Symantec


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  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by anubi on Friday March 30 2018, @06:16AM

    by anubi (2828) on Friday March 30 2018, @06:16AM (#660290) Journal

    Been there... done that... didn't want the T-shirt... just plain disgusted.

    This is how it works...

    Engineer shows technical skills of seeing design flaws. If he's ethical, he is apt to be insubordinate if pressured to do it anyway. I mean what engineer in his right mind would design a bridge he knew was likely to fall down, just because someone else was ranking aesthetics above stress analysis?

    The manager shows leadership skills of handling insubordinate engineers. An engineer stands up to a manager, he's now on the layoff list. A troublemaker.

    Executives show organizational skills of fitting people's roles and corporate goals into an organizational structure.

    And, at the very top, are the people who pay each level what they believe each level is worth.

    Some really bad decisions get made when the people empowered to spend did not have to earn it themselves, instead chartered with the authority to demand funds from someone else. These people may have no use whatsoever for the good in the first place... the whole affair is nothing more than theater to transfer public wealth into private hands, legally, through tax law and disbursement channels.

    --
    "Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." [KJV: I Thessalonians 5:21]
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