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posted by martyb on Tuesday June 05 2018, @08:50AM   Printer-friendly
from the approved-using-a-Pale-Moon-browser dept.

Netmarketshare reports that Mozilla Firefox's share of the desktop and notebook computer web browser market has fallen below ten percent.

Firefox had a market share of 12.63% in June 2017 according to Netmarketshare and even managed to rise above the 13% mark in 2017 before its share fell to 9.92% in May 2018.

Google Chrome, Firefox's biggest rival in the browser world, managed to increase its massive lead from 60.08% in June 2017 to 62.85% in May 2018.

Microsoft's Internet Explorer dropped a percent point to 11.82% in May 2018 and Microsoft's Edge browser gained less than 0.50% to 4.26% over the year.

[...] Netmarketshare collects usage stats and does not get "real" numbers from companies like Mozilla, Google or Microsoft. The company monitors the use of browsers on a subset of Internet sites and creates the market share reports using the data it collects.

While that is certainly good enough for trends if the number of monitored user interactions is high enough, it is not completely accurate and real-world values can be different based on a number of factors. While it is unlikely that they differ a lot, it is certainly possible that the share is different to the one reported by the company.


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  • (Score: 2) by Pino P on Tuesday June 05 2018, @06:22PM (6 children)

    by Pino P (4721) on Tuesday June 05 2018, @06:22PM (#688979) Journal

    I prefer a desktop app whenever I can get it. Preferably written in C or C++

    How should a desktop application be developed so that it will work on Windows, macOS, or X11/Linux with zero changes? Or should everyone buy a Mac so that they can triple-boot in order to run all three flavors of desktop application?

    Starting Score:    1  point
    Karma-Bonus Modifier   +1  

    Total Score:   2  
  • (Score: 1) by tftp on Tuesday June 05 2018, @09:15PM (3 children)

    by tftp (806) on Tuesday June 05 2018, @09:15PM (#689034) Homepage
    You can use Qt.
    • (Score: 2) by Pino P on Wednesday June 06 2018, @12:42PM (2 children)

      by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday June 06 2018, @12:42PM (#689283) Journal

      If I compile an executable using Qt for Windows and distribute it to the public, will people who have installed Qt for macOS or Qt for X11/Linux be able to run that application? Or if I compile using using Qt for macOS, could users of Windows or X11/Linux run it? Or if I compile using Qt for X11/Linux, could users of macOS or Windows run it? Or if I ship solely a source code archive, could users of macOS, Windows, or X11/Linux who aren't programmers figure out how to compile and build it?

      • (Score: 1) by tftp on Wednesday June 06 2018, @03:30PM (1 child)

        by tftp (806) on Wednesday June 06 2018, @03:30PM (#689339) Homepage
        You distribute an executable (installer) compiled for each of those environments. This can be automated in a business. If you want to run the same executable, then you lose performance. JS is a good example.
        • (Score: 2) by Pino P on Wednesday June 06 2018, @04:44PM

          by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday June 06 2018, @04:44PM (#689378) Journal

          You distribute an executable (installer) compiled for each of those environments. This can be automated in a business.

          Which requires you to have a business first, or at least some way to recover the cost of setting up environments with which to test an executable for each of five major client platforms (Windows, X11/Linux, macOS, iOS, and Android). A 1- or 2-man ISV might not have the personpower to support all five as first-class citizens.

  • (Score: 2) by Subsentient on Tuesday June 05 2018, @09:15PM (1 child)

    by Subsentient (1111) on Tuesday June 05 2018, @09:15PM (#689035) Homepage Journal

    I write a lot of C and C++, and I have no trouble getting my code to run under all three major operating systems, even some like Haiku and OpenBSD.
    Windows is the most painful there as it lacks a lot of POSIX APIs, but it's nothing some "#ifdef WIN32" can't handle.

    Mac OS X runs in virtual machines, though it takes some fiddling. No need to buy a mac. Writing cross platform code in C/C++ is nowhere near as hard as some people think it is. An exception is Windows' terrible and butchered networking stack, which has given me a few headaches.

    --
    "It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." -Jiddu Krishnamurti
    • (Score: 2) by Pino P on Wednesday June 06 2018, @12:27PM

      by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday June 06 2018, @12:27PM (#689275) Journal

      I write a lot of C and C++, and I have no trouble getting my code to run under all three major operating systems

      But the developer has to have each of those systems on which to test first.

      Mac OS X runs in virtual machines, though it takes some fiddling. No need to buy a mac.

      Since when did Apple change its Software License Agreement to allow running macOS on a virtual machine whose host is not a Mac? Or since when has it become practical to rent a Mac on which to test?