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posted by chromas on Saturday September 29 2018, @03:05AM   Printer-friendly
from the 640GB-ought-to-be-enough-for-now dept.

OPPO Find X to get 10GB RAM version, spotted at TENAA

There have been rumors of a 10GB RAM smartphone in development for a while now. Vivo's yet unreleased Xplay7 was rumored to come with 10GB RAM and the ASUS ROG Phone was also supposed to come with 10GB of RAM. It appears OPPO will be the first to launch a 10GB RAM phone judging by an updated TENAA listing of the Find X.

The Find X originally comes with 8GB of RAM and 128GB or 256GB of storage but Chinese leaker @UniverseIce shared a photo of an updated listing that shows the Find X will get a new 10GB RAM + 256GB ROM model.

We were able to confirm that the leak is genuine as the full TENAA specs listing for the Find X (PAFM00 model) now has a 10GB RAM variant. The update to the listing was made yesterday. The rest of the specs will remain the same as the other variant.

TENAA is China's phone regulatory body.

Also at The Verge, Engadget, Fossbytes, and BGR.

Related: Samsung Announces 12Gb LPDDR4 DRAM, Could Enable Smartphones With 6 GB of RAM
Samsung Announces 8 GB DRAM Package for Mobile Devices


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  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 29 2018, @04:58AM (4 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 29 2018, @04:58AM (#741705)

    If I could write three million dollars worth of code with sixteen megabytes in 1992, why can't we _all_ do so in 2018?

    Back in 1992, we were all writing code that was "close" to the computer. By that I mean, while most of us weren't writing machine code, there were few layers of abstraction between the application code and the actual CPU execution layer.

    Now there are so many layers upon layers of abstraction -- where abstraction equals "other people's code that we can't operate without yet we have no idea what it's really doing in that black box" -- that must be included/available for any application to work, that applications are relatively huge.

    It's also the reason why so few of the recently graduated "programmers" are any good at real troubleshooting, because they really have no idea what the computer is actually doing. They don't program a computer, they send calls to API classes which do all the real work for them. Lets them worry about font size and eliminating skeuomorphism instead of logic or efficiency.

    But I'm just a bitter old guy so what do I know?

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  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 29 2018, @05:50AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 29 2018, @05:50AM (#741723)

    Now there are so many layers upon layers of abstraction -- where abstraction equals "other people's code that we can't operate without yet we have no idea what it's really doing in that black box" -- that must be included/available for any application to work, that applications are relatively huge.

    Indeed, I did look now and then into sources of Qt to figure out why things don't work. Same with Atmel libraries. Found a crashing bug once in the library - without that fix the code would be a dead end.

    They don't program a computer, they send calls to API classes which do all the real work for them. Lets them worry about font size and eliminating skeuomorphism instead of logic or efficiency.

    That's what abundance of CPU speed and memory does to people. They choose the easiest, cheapest solution that can be sold to the equally undemanding customers. But things like high end CAD software or FPS games are coded with utmost respect to available CPU time.

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Saturday September 29 2018, @06:07AM

      by takyon (881) <{takyon} {at} {soylentnews.org}> on Saturday September 29 2018, @06:07AM (#741729) Journal

      That's what abundance of CPU speed and memory does to people. They choose the easiest, cheapest solution that can be sold to the equally undemanding customers. But things like high end CAD software or FPS games are coded with utmost respect to available CPU time.

      The system works.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
  • (Score: 2) by MichaelDavidCrawford on Saturday September 29 2018, @08:49AM (1 child)

    by MichaelDavidCrawford (2339) Subscriber Badge <mdcrawford@gmail.com> on Saturday September 29 2018, @08:49AM (#741747) Homepage Journal

    I must say I often find some things today that are a vast improvement over their decades-ago equivalents:

    Instead of artificial woodgrain veneer I usually find real wood. For example growing up my family's dining room table had woodgrain formica, but the table I own myself, that i bought in 1998, it's made of real wood - solid even, no veneer.

    --
    Yes I Have No Bananas. [gofundme.com]
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 29 2018, @11:42AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 29 2018, @11:42AM (#741759)

      Real wood is too expensive now