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posted by martyb on Tuesday March 26 2019, @10:48PM   Printer-friendly
from the it's-a-start dept.

Purdue Pharma settles opioid lawsuit for $270m

Purdue Pharma, the drug-maker owned by the billionaire Sackler family, has reached a $270m settlement in a lawsuit which claimed its opioids contributed to the deaths of thousands of people.

The deal with Oklahoma is the first settlement the US firm has struck amid some 2,000 other lawsuits it is facing linked to its painkiller OxyContin.

Purdue is one of several firms named in the claim which alleged they used deceptive practices to sell opioids.

[...]Under the settlement, Purdue will pay $102.5m towards the creation of a National Centre for Addiction Studies and Treatment at Oklahoma State University.

The Sacklers themselves said that they will contribute $75m over five years to the centre.

Also at CNN and NBC.

Previously: OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma May File for Bankruptcy to Disrupt Lawsuits


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 26 2019, @11:37PM (9 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 26 2019, @11:37PM (#820400)

    It's hilarious to me that fake stats like this is the way to take down these scammers . Rather than revealing their entire method of figuring out what is a good idea to give to people or not is essentially a bunch of strung together fallacies (NHST), it is better to come up with more fallacious statistics.

  • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Tuesday March 26 2019, @11:53PM (8 children)

    by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 26 2019, @11:53PM (#820407) Journal

    ...revealing their entire method of figuring out what is a good idea to give to people...

    This doesn't quite parse. Care to rephrase it for a human mind?

    --
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
    • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 26 2019, @11:56PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 26 2019, @11:56PM (#820408)

      Clearly the writings of a Purdue Pharma patient.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 27 2019, @12:32AM (6 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 27 2019, @12:32AM (#820421)

      their entire method of figuring out what is a good idea to give to people or not

      Whether the benefits outweigh the cost when giving sick people a drug.

      • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Wednesday March 27 2019, @12:44AM (3 children)

        by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday March 27 2019, @12:44AM (#820427) Journal

        their method of figuring "Whether the benefits outweigh the cost when giving sick people a drug." [theguardian.com]

        Scientists in the federal government and inside Purdue warned Richard Sackler, then the senior vice-president of Purdue responsible for sales, of the risks that OxyContin would be abused if it was uncontrolled.

        After a co-worker wrote to him with such a warning Sackler responded, according to Tuesday’s filing: “How substantially would it improve your sales?”

        --
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 27 2019, @01:03AM (2 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 27 2019, @01:03AM (#820433)

          What is your point? The government approved it cause "p < 0.05" and they hadn't reached their quote for drugs to approve yet that year.

          • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Wednesday March 27 2019, @01:44AM (1 child)

            by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday March 27 2019, @01:44AM (#820440) Journal

            What is your question? Are you able to formulate it coherently?

            Rather than revealing their entire method of figuring out what is a good idea to give to people or not

            Who are they?

            The government approved it cause "p they hadn't reached their quote for drugs to approve yet that year.

            How is the emphasis relevant?

            --
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 27 2019, @01:51AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 27 2019, @01:51AM (#820442)

              Sorry, I don't have a question for you. It is clear what will convince you, and it don't involve no compound sentences.

      • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Wednesday March 27 2019, @02:10AM (1 child)

        by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday March 27 2019, @02:10AM (#820446) Journal

        I don't think anyone questions that oxycontin is a good and useful drug, sometimes. Pushing drugs for profit is the issue here. Rewarding successful pushers is the issue.

        --
        We've finally beat Medicare! - Houseplant in Chief
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 27 2019, @02:21AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 27 2019, @02:21AM (#820455)

          Here is what they did:

          1. Test "addictiveness" in in-patients who are sitting in a miserable room under doctor/nurse supervision
          - Result: p < 0.05 for pain killing but p > 0.05 for habit-forming

          2. Extrapolate the results of #1 to out-patients who are sitting at home watching TV and drinking beer when they pop a pill