Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by Fnord666 on Wednesday April 03 2019, @11:14PM   Printer-friendly
from the privacy-policies-are-for-suckers dept.

Submitted via IRC for chromas

FamilyTreeDNA Deputizes Itself, Starts Pitching DNA Matching Services To Law Enforcement

One DNA-matching company has decided it's going to corner an under-served market: US law enforcement. FamilyTreeDNA -- last seen here opening up its database to the FBI without informing its users first -- is actively pitching its services to law enforcement.

The television spot, to air in San Diego first, asks anyone who has had a direct-to-consumer DNA test from another company, like 23andMe or Ancestry.com, to upload a copy so that law enforcement can spot any connections to DNA found at crime scenes.

The advertisement features Ed Smart, father of Elizabeth Smart, a Salt Lake City teen who was abducted in 2002 but later found alive. “If you are one of the millions of people who have taken a DNA test, your help can provide the missing link,” he says in the spot.

Welcome to FamilyTreeDNA's cooperating witness program -- one it profits from by selling information customers give it to law enforcement. The tug at the heartstrings is a nice touch. FamilyTreeDNA is finally being upfront with users about its intentions for their DNA samples. This is due to its founder deciding -- without consulting his customers -- that they're all as willing as he is to convert your DNA samples into public goods.

Bennett Greenspan, the firm’s founder, said he had decided he had a moral obligation to help solve old murders and rapes. Now he thinks that customers will agree and make their DNA available specifically to help out.


Original Submission

 
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by khallow on Thursday April 04 2019, @03:26AM (3 children)

    by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday April 04 2019, @03:26AM (#824350) Journal
    This sounds like a huge medical information violation. Class action lawsuit ought to clear that problem right up?
    Starting Score:    1  point
    Moderation   +2  
       Interesting=1, Informative=1, Total=2
    Extra 'Interesting' Modifier   0  

    Total Score:   3  
  • (Score: 2, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 04 2019, @06:15AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 04 2019, @06:15AM (#824374)

    I notice you didn't read the small print of the Terms of Service, like 100% of the other customers. It's on page 4814, bottom of third paragraph:

    ...and having donated my firstborn to the mercy of the Corporation I also solemnly swear that any and all results of the tests performed and information inferred by the Corporation and selected 3rd parties and welcome to use the materials as they see fit, including but definitely not limited to selling to highest bidding Law enforcement agencies of any countries on any planets.

    • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 04 2019, @08:45AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 04 2019, @08:45AM (#824400)

      including but definitely not limited to selling to highest bidding Law enforcement agencies of any countries on any planets.

      Oh hogwash. They don't have to be the highest bidding law enforcement agencies, they just need to pay list price (plus a variety of taxes, fees, surcharges and for digital delivery).

    • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday April 04 2019, @01:50PM

      by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday April 04 2019, @01:50PM (#824481) Journal
      EULAs don't protect against everything. Promiscuous sharing of genetic data is probably going to cross that line.