Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

SoylentNews is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop. Only 6 submissions in the queue.
posted by LaminatorX on Wednesday February 26 2014, @11:00PM   Printer-friendly
from the studies-show-poverty-causes-cancer dept.

Angry Jesus writes:

"The Chicago Police Department is mis-applying epidemiological science (the study of entire populations) to target individuals in a real-life version of Minority Report. They have decided that it is a good idea to put people on a secret list based on a Big Data analysis of their social networks. But don't worry, it isn't racist or abusive because, Science!"

 
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 1) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 26 2014, @11:56PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 26 2014, @11:56PM (#7647)

    Statistics show that young adult black males are the most likely to commit crimes. How much variation within that population will a computer program be able to find? I wonder how the people determine the social networks. Do they scrape Facebook? Do the cops report who is together during an arrest? Will teachers write down who sits together at lunch? Will phone calls between people be used?

    Starting Score:    0  points
    Moderation   +1  
       Underrated=1, Total=1

    Total Score:   1  
  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by demonlapin on Thursday February 27 2014, @12:43AM

    by demonlapin (925) on Thursday February 27 2014, @12:43AM (#7677) Journal
    From TFA:

    22-year-old high school dropout

    hadn't committed a crime or interacted with a police officer recently

    he didn't have a violent criminal record, nor any gun violations.

    Emphasis added. That looks like a pretty straightforward criminal profile: guy who has committed property crimes in the past, high likelihood he'll be a repeat offender. In fact, I heard about just this sort of program being used in High Point, NC, on NPR [npr.org] last month. And they were very positive about it. They even talked about how Chicago was going to try to implement it.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 27 2014, @02:47PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 27 2014, @02:47PM (#7970)

      I parsed that sentence differently:

      "hadn't (committed a crime) or (interacted with a police officer recently)"

      • (Score: 1) by demonlapin on Friday February 28 2014, @01:19AM

        by demonlapin (925) on Friday February 28 2014, @01:19AM (#8196) Journal
        If your reading were correct, they would not have had to say "did not have a violent criminal record". They would just have said "did not have a criminal record".