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posted by martyb on Saturday May 25 2019, @04:49AM   Printer-friendly
from the profits-at-all-costs dept.

Infamous OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma used front organizations and sponsored research to deceive the World Health Organization and corrupt global public health policies with the goal of boosting international opioid sales and profits, according to a Congressional report (PDF) released Thursday, May 22.

The investigation identified two WHO guidance documents that appear to parrot some of Purdue's misleading and outright false marketing claims about the safety and efficacy of their highly addictive opioids.

The findings, released by Reps. Katherine Clark (D-Mass.) and Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), land as the country is still grappling with an epidemic of opioid abuse and overdoses. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioid overdoses kill an average of 130 Americans every day.

Clark and Rogers say that the motivation for the investigation follows a 2017 warning letter Congress members sent to the WHO. Given the opioid epidemic unfolding in the US, the lawmakers warned the WHO that opioid makers would try to expand into international markets, which could potentially trigger a global epidemic. But the Congress members say they didn't get a response (though the WHO disputes this).

"When the WHO failed to respond to the letter, we began to question why they would remain silent about such a significant and devastating public health epidemic," the report reads. "The answers we found are deeply disturbing."

Based on public records, the report outlines a tangle of organizations and individuals that connect financial threads from Purdue to WHO.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/05/world-health-organization-parroted-purdues-deceptive-opioid-claims-report-says/


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  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 25 2019, @07:21AM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 25 2019, @07:21AM (#847532)

    Even if it was a 100% addiction rate, he is not forcing anyone to take it. Addiction itself doesn't force people to take drugs. They willingly feed the addiction. They choose to do it because it is easier than quitting. They are doing it to themselves. Blaming someone else is just enabling the user to continue using. Because it's the addictions fault they're using. It's the drug manufacturers fault. No. It's their fault. It's their problem. They need to accept responsibility for their life. Now, if they sell the user contaminated drugs, then yeah, it's the manufacturers fault.

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  • (Score: 4, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Saturday May 25 2019, @08:05AM (2 children)

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Saturday May 25 2019, @08:05AM (#847536) Journal

    Obviously, you've been addicted, and beat the addiction. That's the only way you could know so much about addiction.

    Unless, of course, you're just another fucking shill.

    One thing I'm certain of. Unscrupulous assholes can and will do anything for a dollar. They don't know, don't want to know, don't care how much human misery they might cause, so long as there is money to be had.

    --
    ‘Never trust a man whose uncle was eaten by cannibals’
    • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 25 2019, @03:03PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 25 2019, @03:03PM (#847609)

      Former addicts can be the most judgmental. Something got broken in their brains and they extrapolate their issues to everyone.

      • (Score: 1) by khallow on Sunday May 26 2019, @04:20AM

        by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Sunday May 26 2019, @04:20AM (#847808) Journal
        Well, they were addicts in the first place. So something was indeed broken in their brains.

        As to the hostile response, that's a natural response to something that you're particularly susceptible to. In my view, one doesn't get rid of the mental temptation of addiction. Instead, something has to change in your brain in order to resist the ever-present temptation (and the behaviors that can lead to resumption of the addiction). For a strong addiction, you need a similarly strong resistance.

        But sure, blame the victim, right?