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posted by martyb on Monday July 08 2019, @02:19AM   Printer-friendly
from the one-soy-based-hemispherical-cross-section-please dept.

A new law in Mississippi(1) makes it illegal to refer to plant and cell-culture based patties as 'burgers'.

The law would also prohibit the use of "burger" or "dog" in relation to vat-grown, cell-based food, which is made of meat. The statute reserves these appelations for foodstuffs derived from "slaughtered livestock."

The law has naturally been challenged by parties such as the Good Food Institute and the American Civil Liberties Union among others. In a nutshell

The contention on the meat industry side is:

Mike McCormick, president of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation: "This bill will protect our cattle farmers from having to compete with products not harvested from an animal."

The contention on the other side is:

"There's nothing misleading about the name of a veggie burger, or vegan hot dog, or seitan bacon," Almy, a lawyer on the Missouri case, told me. "The packages clearly disclose that this is plant-based food that has the taste or texture of this familiar food."

A typical American would likely fall somewhere between these two views.

I fully understand (and at times enjoy) 'veggie burgers', however I had to look up 'seitan bacon' (FYI - a traditional Japanese wheat based food that is meat-like) and would not have known what it was at a glance (does super-seitan bacon go to 9000 calories?)

So where do patrons of Soylent Words-Related-to-Current-Happenings fall on this one?

(1) - Note TFA bounces between Missouri and Mississippi actions. There are similar labeling laws in both states. SB 627 in Missouri and SB 2922 in Mississippi.

Related: U.S. Cattlemen's Association Wants an Official Definition of "Meat"
Regulation Coming to Lab-Grown Meat


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  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by sgleysti on Monday July 08 2019, @04:05AM (2 children)

    by sgleysti (56) on Monday July 08 2019, @04:05AM (#864323)

    Although unless the vat-grown or plant-based producers can get themselves subsidized in the same fashion that the farmers have I wonder if they will be able to compete on price anyway.

    Plants take a lot fewer resources to grow than animals, especially when considering the caloric value or even the mass of the resulting food. You have a very valid point about vat-grown, but in that case, if the end product is animal flesh, what else is it besides meat?

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  • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday July 08 2019, @05:41AM (1 child)

    by c0lo (156) on Monday July 08 2019, @05:41AM (#864355) Journal

    Plants take a lot fewer resources to grow than animals, especially when considering the caloric value or even the mass of the resulting food.

    Have you figured out why the humans are omnivorous, though?

    You have a very valid point about vat-grown, but in that case, if the end product is animal flesh, what else is it besides meat?

    Well, that's a big if that you have there.
    Not as big as "if ever FTL travel will become possible" but certainly harder that "scale down the gate sizes to 3 nm in the current CPU-es".

    --
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 08 2019, @10:36PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 08 2019, @10:36PM (#864731)

      Have you figured out why the humans are omnivorous, though?

      Outsourcing.

      Seriously: protein production/fabrication, bio-accumulation of trace minerals, and in the case of pigs, turning crap into something tasty!