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posted by LaminatorX on Thursday February 27 2014, @11:03PM   Printer-friendly
from the All-roads-lead-to-where-now? dept.

An Anonymous Coward writes:

"Good news, everyone! A brand-new version of QGIS has been released (changelog). QGIS, a full-featured GPL-licensed GIS program has been under active development for twelve years and is now at version 2.2. Funded by a wide range of organizations, the QGIS project lets users create professional-quality maps that compete well with the output of established proprietary GIS packages like ArcView and MapInfo. Notable features of the program include its support for a wide range of file formats, modular design, map server, web publishing, as well as easy python scripting, and an extensive python plugin library.

For those interested, versions are available for GNU/Linux, BSD, Windows, MacOS X, and Android here."

 
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  • (Score: 1) by Scruffy on Friday February 28 2014, @05:03PM

    by Scruffy (1087) on Friday February 28 2014, @05:03PM (#8600)

    I found this tutorial [harvard.edu] from Harvard instrumental in learning to use QGIS. It's currently geared towards version 1.7.3 but you should still be able to find your way around.

    My favorite source of geomatic data is GeoBase [geobase.ca] but I am biased, since I live in Canada. ;)

    I also recommend the OpenLayers plugin [qgis.org], which can underlay data from OpenStreetMap, Google or Bing. I used that plus my GPS-enabled smartphone to create field maps for several local farmers for a nominal fee.

    --
    1087 is a lucky prime.
  • (Score: 1) by germanbird on Saturday March 01 2014, @06:30AM

    by germanbird (2619) on Saturday March 01 2014, @06:30AM (#8989)

    I used that plus my GPS-enabled smartphone to create field maps for several local farmers for a nominal fee.

    That is a great idea. I can think of a couple of projects I could probably use this for out on the family farm. That might just be enough to get me started (assuming that I can carve out some time for it). Thanks.