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posted by martyb on Saturday September 07 2019, @05:44AM   Printer-friendly
from the "Long-Pig" dept.

A Swedish behavioral scientist has suggested that it may be necessary to turn to cannibalism and start eating humans in order to save the planet.

Appearing on Swedish television to talk about an event based around the "food of the future," Magnus Söderlund said he would be holding seminars on the necessity of consuming human flesh in order to stop climate change.

Environmentalists blame the meat and farming industry for a large part of what they claim is the warming of the earth.

According to Söderlund, a potential fix would be the Soylent Green-solution of eating dead bodies instead.

https://summit.news/2019/09/04/swedish-behavioral-scientist-suggests-eating-humans-to-save-the-planet/

[Ed note: At first I was going to give this story a pass and then, well... this site is called SoylentNews said name being tangentially related to Soylent Green and the tag line is: "SoylentNews is people", so it only goes to follow that you are what you eat, right? Feel free to comment seriously, but I'm quite frankly more interested in what kind of fun the community can have with this story! Some jokes just write themselves. --martyb]


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  • (Score: 2) by Reziac on Sunday September 08 2019, @04:06AM (4 children)

    by Reziac (2489) on Sunday September 08 2019, @04:06AM (#891176) Homepage

    Yet the other day Brazil's minister of the interior pointed out that the Amazon rain forest is something like 94% pristine and intact. He was quite irritated with the panic over it's-all-burning-up and all-being-cut-down.

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    And there is no Alkibiades to come back and save us from ourselves.
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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 08 2019, @05:25AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 08 2019, @05:25AM (#891205)
  • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Sunday September 08 2019, @03:05PM (2 children)

    by JoeMerchant (3937) on Sunday September 08 2019, @03:05PM (#891316)

    Yet the other day Brazil's minister of the interior pointed out that the Amazon rain forest is something like 94% pristine and intact. He was quite

    inebriated and completely in denial of the actual facts of the matter.

    Was his baseline the year 2000, or what?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deforestation_of_the_Amazon_rainforest#Forest_loss_rates [wikipedia.org]

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    🌻🌻 [google.com]
    • (Score: 2) by Reziac on Sunday September 08 2019, @04:07PM (1 child)

      by Reziac (2489) on Sunday September 08 2019, @04:07PM (#891331) Homepage

      I note that the cites for that wiki article are almost entirely opinion pieces.

      Then I look at NASA's change in leaf area map, consider that probably both sides are wrong, and that the rainforest area is probably increasing, but is mostly too young to be counted.

      https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/change_in_leaf_area.jpg [nasa.gov]

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      And there is no Alkibiades to come back and save us from ourselves.
      • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Sunday September 08 2019, @09:01PM

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Sunday September 08 2019, @09:01PM (#891397)

        Young grass does not support the same biodiversity or carbon capture as old growth tropical hardwoods.

        Tree cover is increasing in Florida, too... but that doesn't change the fact that 90%+ of the old growth was cut, used, and replaced with frankly poor substitutes. Yes, Frankly, as in the Oscar Meyer ranches, among others.

        We bought some land that was cut in the 1800s, to float logs down the river to a sawmill that built a little town - which burned within 20 years after it was built. Given 100+ years to regrow, it's starting to be a decent wildlife habitat again, too bad that the neighbors have all been incentivized (by tax breaks) to clear their forest and make way for a few farce-cattle on their land, farce because they get more in tax breaks than they could ever make from the cows - cows that they generally lose money on.

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