Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by LaminatorX on Tuesday August 26 2014, @03:06PM   Printer-friendly
from the more-important-than-a-wardrobe-malfunction dept.

TechCrunch reports

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced Friday it would extend the net neutrality reply comment period from September 10 to September 15.

The commission has already received more than 1.1 million comments, which it released to the public last week. That is the largest number of comments the FCC has ever received, with the exception of Janet Jackson's "wardrobe malfunction" in 2004, which garnered 1.4 million comments. With three extra days, net neutrality commenters will likely beat that.

The deadline for the reply comment period was pushed back to match the extension of the initial comment period, which occurred in July after the FCC experienced issues with its website. Because the first comment period was extended three additional business days and the reply period then started later, the FCC extended the period for reply comments.

"To ensure that members of the public have as much time as was initially anticipated to reply to initial comments in these proceedings, the Bureau today is extending the reply comment deadline by three business days," the FCC said in a release.

So keep your comments coming!

Related:
FCC Extends Internet Slow Lane Comment Period

 
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 1) by JNCF on Wednesday August 27 2014, @02:51PM

    by JNCF (4317) on Wednesday August 27 2014, @02:51PM (#86268) Journal

    If you violated the terms you agreed to uphold then I think you'd suffer the consequences that were explained to you during the process getting the license.

    I don't have a broadcasting license of any sort, so I never agreed to their terms. Yet they still reserve the right search my property without a warrant to inspect my wifi router, [wired.com] and fine the piss out of me if I had the balls to operate a "pirate" radio station. Please don't resort to invoking social contracts to explain why this is acceptable.

  • (Score: 2) by Tork on Wednesday August 27 2014, @03:18PM

    by Tork (3914) on Wednesday August 27 2014, @03:18PM (#86280)
    Do you even undertand anything about why the airwaves are regulated? I'm just curious because you just spouted to me a clickbait line from an article that claimed to be about routers but was really about pirate radio stations. If you actually understood why the regulations are in place and what it would really take to get the pirate radio station dudes to come out and check your router, then you'd understand that you were seriously and intentionally causing a problem that could kill people. If you were to become aware of that then you would have a different set of expectations.
    --
    Slashdolt Logic: "24 year old jokes about sharks and lasers are +5, Funny." 💩