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posted by janrinok on Thursday June 10, @02:52PM   Printer-friendly

CHIME Telescope Detects More Than 500 Mysterious Fast Radio Bursts From Outer Space:

To catch sight of a fast radio burst is to be extremely lucky in where and when you point your radio dish. Fast radio bursts, or FRBs, are oddly bright flashes of light, registering in the radio band of the electromagnetic spectrum, that blaze for a few milliseconds before vanishing without a trace.

These brief and mysterious beacons have been spotted in various and distant parts of the universe, as well as in our own galaxy. Their origins are unknown, and their appearance is unpredictable. Since the first was discovered in 2007, radio astronomers have only caught sight of around 140 bursts in their scopes.

Now, a large stationary radio telescope in British Columbia has nearly quadrupled the number of fast radio bursts discovered to date. The telescope, known as CHIME, for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, has detected 535 new fast radio bursts during its first year of operation, between 2018 and 2019.

Scientists with the CHIME Collaboration, including researchers at MIT, have assembled the new signals in the telescope's first FRB catalog, which they will present this week at the American Astronomical Society Meeting.

The new catalog significantly expands the current library of known FRBs, and is already yielding clues as to their properties. For instance, the newly discovered bursts appear to fall in two distinct classes: those that repeat, and those that don't. Scientists identified 18 FRB sources that burst repeatedly, while the rest appear to be one-offs. The repeaters also look different, with each burst lasting slightly longer and emitting more focused radio frequencies than bursts from single, nonrepeating FRBs.

These observations strongly suggest that repeaters and one-offs arise from separate mechanisms and astrophysical sources. With more observations, astronomers hope soon to pin down the extreme origins of these curiously bright signals.

"Before CHIME, there were less than 100 total discovered FRBs; now, after one year of observation, we've discovered hundreds more," says CHIME member Kaitlyn Shin, a graduate student in MIT's Department of Physics. "With all these sources, we can really start getting a picture of what FRBs look like as a whole, what astrophysics might be driving these events, and how they can be used to study the universe going forward."


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  • (Score: 2) by Socrastotle on Thursday June 10, @04:33PM (1 child)

    by Socrastotle (13446) on Thursday June 10, @04:33PM (#1143928) Journal

    It's also the kind of thing that could, at least potentially, explain the Fermi Paradox. One hypothesis for the Ordovician mass extinction event, was a gamma ray burst.

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  • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Thursday June 10, @05:01PM

    by JoeMerchant (3937) on Thursday June 10, @05:01PM (#1143946)

    Spoiler alert: the Milky Way's local cluster has been designated a "Level 3 limited" zone by the Universal directorate. Any life found to be capable of interstellar propagation is to be sterilized by narrow beam GRB, after harvest of any interesting cultural artifacts... the primitives can be so amusing sometimes.

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