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posted by martyb on Thursday January 20, @01:12AM   Printer-friendly
from the of-course-nobody-ever-gets-bored dept.

Study: Basic income would not reduce people's willingness to work:

A basic income would not necessarily mean that people would work less. This is the conclusion of a series of behavioral experiments by cognitive psychologist Fenna Poletiek, social psychologist Erik de Kwaadsteniet and cognitive psychologist Bastiaan Vuyk. They also found indications that people with a basic income are more likely to find a job that suits them better.

The psychologists received a grant from the FNV union to research the behavioral effects of a basic income. They simulated the reward structure of different forms of social security in an experiment. "We got people to do a task on a computer," says De Kwaadsteniet. "In multiple rounds, which represented the months they had to work, they did a boring task in which they had to put points on a bar. The more of these they did, the more money they earned."

The psychologists researched three different conditions: no social security, a conditional benefits system and an unconditional basic income. De Kwaadsteniet: "In the condition without social security, the test participants didn't receive a basic sum. In the benefits condition they received a basic sum, which they lost as soon as they started working. In the basic income condition they received the same basic sum but didn't lose this when they started work."

The basic income did not cause a reduction in the participants' willingness to work and efforts, say the psychologists. Nor did their salary expectations increase. "In the discussion on a basic income, it's sometimes said that people will sit around doing nothing if you give them free money," says Poletiek, who saw no indications of such a behavioral effect.

What would you do if you were to receive a basic income?


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  • (Score: 0, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 20, @04:03AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 20, @04:03AM (#1214058)

    > What would you do if you were to receive a basic income?

    Contribute to a basic economics course for the authors of this "study" who clearly don't understand the importance of productive, low-paid jobs or the basics of human psychology.

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  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Runaway1956 on Thursday January 20, @06:40PM

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday January 20, @06:40PM (#1214266) Homepage Journal

    importance of productive, low-paid jobs

    I'm not entirely sold on the importance of low-paid jobs. Many jobs in the US are under valued, and under paid. You need look no further than the next waitress/waiter to serve a meal to you. Historically, wait staff has been outrageously exploited by business, and you and I are expected to make up the difference with tips.

    The concept of a minimum wage should be uniformly applied to all people, in all professions, trades, and whatever. I could make a nice long list of people who are exploited by business. When I got out of the military, I thought I was well qualified to get into security. I applied for, and was interviewed for some security positions. When I learned how badly they were exploiting security officers, I decided that I didn't really need a job that badly. I turned to truck driving instead, and made more money than any beginning position security officer.

    All workers should be valued failry, and undervaluing their services does society no good at all.

    --
    Our first six presidents were educated men. Then, along came a Democrat.