Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by janrinok on Thursday May 12, @11:15AM   Printer-friendly
from the don't-let-the-changes-get-you-down dept.

Why our continued use of fossil fuels is creating a financial time bomb:

We know roughly how much more carbon dioxide we can put into the atmosphere before we exceed our climate goals—limiting warming to 1.5° to 2° C above pre-industrial temperatures. From that, we can figure out how much more fossil fuel we can burn before we emit that much carbon dioxide. But when you compare those numbers with our known fossil fuel reserves, things get jaw-dropping.

To reach our climate goals, we'll need to leave a third of the oil, half of the natural gas, and nearly all the coal we're aware of sitting in the ground, unused.

Yet we have—and are still building—infrastructure that is predicated on burning far more than that: mines, oil and gas wells, refineries, and the distribution networks that get all those products to market; power plants, cars, trains, boats, and airplanes that use the fuels. If we're to reach our climate goals, some of those things will have to be intentionally shut down and left to sit idle before they can deliver a return on the money they cost to produce.

But it's not just physical capital that will cause problems if we decide to get serious about addressing climate change. We have workers who are trained to use all of the idled hardware, companies that treat the fuel reserves and hardware as an asset on their balance sheets, and various contracts that dictate that the reserves can be exploited.

Collectively, you can think of all of these things as assets—assets that, if we were to get serious about climate change, would see their value drop to zero. At that point, they'd be termed "stranded assets," and their stranding has the potential to unleash economic chaos on the world.

Do you agree with this arguably pessimistic assessment of the situation, and have we already run out of time to take the action necessary to avoid exceeding climate goals? Criticism is easy, but what solutions do you have to the problem?


Original Submission

 
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @01:30PM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @01:30PM (#1244377)

    Their value could drop to zero overnight if we begin tapping stuff like fusion.

    Starting Score:    0  points
    Moderation   +1  
       Interesting=1, Total=1
    Extra 'Interesting' Modifier   0  

    Total Score:   1  
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @04:17PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @04:17PM (#1244446)

    Go ahead and turn on your Mr. Fusion. Show all those dumb physicists who've been working on it for decades how it's done.

  • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Thursday May 12, @04:37PM

    by maxwell demon (1608) on Thursday May 12, @04:37PM (#1244451) Journal

    Overnight? I'm pretty sure it will take longer than one night to build a fusion plant.

    Anyway, assuming the current predictions of when fusion is ready are correct, we still have decades of renewable sources having worth. Indeed, longer than the expected lifetime of a typical solar cell or windmill.

    And if the predictions are wrong, it most probably will take even longer until renewable sources lose their value.

    --
    The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
  • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Thursday May 12, @06:32PM

    by JoeMerchant (3937) on Thursday May 12, @06:32PM (#1244484)

    Their value will be far from zero no matter what the outcome.

    Roughnecks working rigs are still qualified for all kinds of shit work that needs doing even after oil rigs are gone.

    The rigs themselves can be recycled for the steel, and much of the equipment onboard has value.

    Helicopters that shuttle workers to/from oil rigs lose virtually no value when oil production shuts down.

    But, overall, yes - a lot of rich people will take a big hit on their relative net-worth if oil production suddenly stops, and look around for the last 50 years since the big OPEC scare - they seem to be protecting their assets quite effectively so far.

    --
    Україна не входить до складу Росії.