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posted by janrinok on Wednesday May 24 2023, @02:31AM   Printer-friendly
from the it's-almost-over dept.

https://www.howtogeek.com/894161/the-great-raspberry-pi-shortage-might-be-coming-to-an-end/

According to Raspberry Pi CEO, Eben Upton, in an interview with YouTuber Jeff Geerling, the company put together 750,000 Raspberry Pi units in the first quarter of the year. That isn't a lot, but it also says that it's on track for building 2 million units this second quarter, helping it fill backlogged orders and paving the way for "unconstrained" supply during the remaining half of the year. Ultimately though, it means that you should expect units such as the Raspberry Pi 4 to be more widely available by the end of this year.


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  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Rich on Wednesday May 24 2023, @10:49AM (6 children)

    by Rich (945) on Wednesday May 24 2023, @10:49AM (#1307871) Journal

    "No Longer Dry" != "more widely available by the end of this year"

    I watched one of the recent interviews with Upton. He's moved so far into the MBA corner that he talked for an hour (and he talks super fast) without me remembering that he said anything meaningful.

    But the competition just doesn't pick up. Imagine "what if" Radxa (makers of the RockPi) made Naomi Wu their spokesperson. :)

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  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by ElizabethGreene on Wednesday May 24 2023, @02:07PM (5 children)

    by ElizabethGreene (6748) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday May 24 2023, @02:07PM (#1307903) Journal

    The last interview I watched with him was informative to me. My big takeaways were:

    * The reason for the current shortage is that all the component fabs ran down their inventories pre-Covid and were slow to ramp up post-Covid. That's caused month-to-year long delays for some components as other OEs buy out entire fab runs to refill their funnels.

    * As mentioned above, they expect broad availability of all products by Q4 of this year. The older products are more likely to be available sooner than the newer ones.

    * When interviewing a potential hire, "Can you talk about a project you've worked on that wasn't for work or school?" is an extremely good way to gauge a person.

    * In both Computer Science and Business you can self-teach or you can get a formal education; both approaches have advantages and disadvantages. Both approaches will leave you with blind spots.

    He's an interesting guy.

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Rich on Wednesday May 24 2023, @03:23PM (3 children)

      by Rich (945) on Wednesday May 24 2023, @03:23PM (#1307925) Journal

      The reason for the current shortage is that all the component fabs ran down their inventories pre-Covid and were slow to ramp up post-Covid. That's caused month-to-year long delays for some components as other OEs buy out entire fab runs to refill their funnels.

      That is no news, and it could have been condensed to under a minute: "We've had, and are still having, an extreme example of the pig cycle with the suppliers.". At no point did it get interesting, except maybe the hint that the Pi 4's SoC is on a smaller node than the previous ones and (implied only!) they can't get wafer starts.

      As mentioned above, they expect broad availability of all products by Q4 of this year. The older products are more likely to be available sooner than the newer ones.

      This is far from TFA's "no longer dry" and even "Raspberry Pi 4 [...] more widely available" reads to me as "a drop of water on a hot stone is less dry than the hot stone alone".

      When interviewing a potential hire, "Can you talk about a project you've worked on that wasn't for work or school?" is an extremely good way to gauge a person.

      Hiring 1x1. Nothing you wouldn't hear from any self-appointed HR coach on YouTube in their first video. As in "show me your github". However, you'll be lucky these days if someone comes your way as a small business, who's able to show anything in that regard. A personal favourite of mine to complement that is: "What kind of music do you MAKE?". I've found that people who make music in any fashion will hardly ever be a dud to work with.

      In both Computer Science and Business you can self-teach or you can get a formal education; both approaches have advantages and disadvantages. Both approaches will leave you with blind spots.

      A prime example of saying nothing for a prolonged period, because it's bloody obvious. What I indeed took away is that he suggested orthogonal studies, i.e. if you're into computer science, consider studying business, and vice versa.

      I've had the displeasure of working with UK IT people before, and my impression is that they're more cutthroat about business than anywhere else, yet perform only at average levels. Raspi got the kickstart from Broadcom (*) and still surfs on the lucky wave that few Chinese have another attitude than "spot the money, take it, and run".

      (*) I think I remember one thing from the interview: "To be successful in business, you need to be lucky." ;)

      • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday May 24 2023, @05:41PM (2 children)

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday May 24 2023, @05:41PM (#1307972)

        >We've had, and are still having, an extreme example of the pig cycle with the suppliers.

        A toilet paper analogy could also help there...

        >a drop of water on a hot stone is less dry than the hot stone alone

        Inasmuch as six million units is a drop of water

        >you'll be lucky these days if someone comes your way as a small business, who's able to show anything

        Once upon a time I threw an application to a small business and I took the time to look up a couple of their patents, and somehow let them know I had done this in the application letter. They seemed to be mightily impressed, they invited me over and a team of 4-6 engineers interviewed me for several hours. All because I took the effort to look up a couple of their patents. The labor pool must be really shallow...

        >it's bloody obvious

        And bloody important, and bloody well unknown to a LOT of people out there who would be much better off if they finally saw the obviousness of it - which they are unlikely to, but even if that message only sinks into 1/1000 concrete blockheads who hear it, it's making meaningful positive change in the world.

        --
        🌻🌻 [google.com]
        • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Wednesday May 24 2023, @06:56PM (1 child)

          by Immerman (3985) on Wednesday May 24 2023, @06:56PM (#1307991)

          >The labor pool must be really shallow...

          That's the ideal right? Low unemployment?

          More than that though, even that little bit of effort suggests that both you're competent enough to have plenty of other options, so could discard their offer before you even apply, and that you are interested in working specifically for them. And looking into the patents rather than (in addition to?) their business history and public propaganda (web site, etc) suggests you're interested in the work itself, not just what they can offer you in return.

          How many people actually care about their employer? There's lots of opportunities for anyone competent, and with the death of company loyalty it's ultimately just a business transaction - they're buying your labor with some combination of money, benefits, and work environment until one of you gets a better offer. And if the specific work they're doing interests you then you're likely to be both more productive and more difficult to lure away. And if they're not-uncommon dickish employers, more likely to be willing to work for lower wages.

          • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday May 24 2023, @08:31PM

            by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday May 24 2023, @08:31PM (#1308007)

            >How many people actually care about their employer?

            Well, there's the other employer that I researched their open FDA warning letters after getting my initial interview scheduled... I went through with the interview for the practice, and perspective, and experience, and having done so I was really trying to get the offer that I would ultimately be refusing, but that hesitation came through during the conversation... I really really didn't want to work for a place that's so immature they still think they can tell the FDA to go F themselves and get away with it.

            --
            🌻🌻 [google.com]
    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday May 24 2023, @05:32PM

      by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday May 24 2023, @05:32PM (#1307967)

      I've been watching the horrors of JIT supply chain off and on firsthand since 1986... the COVID supply chain meltdown wasn't only predictable, it was long overdue.

      >Both approaches will leave you with blind spots.

      All approaches leave humans with blind spots, which is why there is power in diversity and strong communication skills.

      --
      🌻🌻 [google.com]