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posted by martyb on Friday January 23 2015, @01:29PM   Printer-friendly
from the DNA->SNA->SLA->TLA->TBA->NBA->NBC->NEC->SEC->SEO->SCO->TCO->TMO->GMO dept.

The Washington Post contains an article on a recent survey by Oklahoma State University where over 80 percent of Americans support “mandatory labels on foods containing DNA,”

The Oklahoma State survey result is probably an example of the intersection between scientific ignorance and political ignorance, both of which are widespread.The most obvious explanation for the data is that most of these people don’t really understand what DNA is, and don’t realize that it is contained in almost all food. When they read that a strange substance called “DNA” might be included in their food, they might suspect that this is some dangerous chemical inserted by greedy corporations for their own nefarious purposes.

The article discusses the wider issue of scientific ignorance driving policy decisions, and there is some further comment at io9. A summary of the full survey results is available (PDF).

 
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  • (Score: 1) by Nuke on Friday January 23 2015, @01:57PM

    by Nuke (3162) on Friday January 23 2015, @01:57PM (#137237)

    So what? Even with all the other health and safety crap on labels, I am sure they could still find some room for "Contains DNA". Add dihydrogen oxide too and a list of every substance on Earth because there could be trace of it.

    It is like nuts. Every food, even soda water, I buy these days says " May contain traces of nuts". It has ceased to be meaningful.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 23 2015, @02:11PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 23 2015, @02:11PM (#137239)

    That's because can of tuna does not need to have tuna in it.

  • (Score: 2) by E_NOENT on Friday January 23 2015, @02:29PM

    by E_NOENT (630) on Friday January 23 2015, @02:29PM (#137245) Journal

    I was going to mention the dihydrogen oxide stuff as well.

    This just in: Simple concepts can be expressed in a way that makes them sound complicated, and given the right context, people reflexively assume the worst!

    It's all sensationalist clickbat.

    --
    I'm not in the business... I *am* the business.
    • (Score: 2) by MrNemesis on Friday January 23 2015, @04:58PM

      by MrNemesis (1582) on Friday January 23 2015, @04:58PM (#137312)

      You might very well glibly say that from the comfort of your home, but how would you feel if you knew that agents working under the Democrats are allowing hydric acid to pollute the water supply of states that predominantly vote Republican? And that neither the president, CDC or FEMA plan to do anything about it?

      What's next, children's ice cream?

      --
      "To paraphrase Nietzsche, I have looked into the abyss and been sick in it."
      • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Saturday January 24 2015, @12:54AM

        by HiThere (866) on Saturday January 24 2015, @12:54AM (#137495) Journal

        Hydric acid??? I suppose you're saying H+ + OH-, but wouldn't that by hydroxic acid or something. Hydric acid should describe any acid at all, as the H+ ion is practically(?) the definition of acid.

        --
        Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
      • (Score: 2) by dyingtolive on Saturday January 24 2015, @09:56PM

        by dyingtolive (952) on Saturday January 24 2015, @09:56PM (#137696)

        If I were him, I'd continue speaking glibly until I saw I was in a red state. :(

        --
        Don't blame me, I voted for moose wang!
  • (Score: 2) by nitehawk214 on Friday January 23 2015, @03:10PM

    by nitehawk214 (1304) on Friday January 23 2015, @03:10PM (#137258)

    "It is like nuts."

    I agree, the labeling crazyness is nuts.

    The worst part is, there are things that should be labeled, but get drowned out in a wave of "Fat Free Organiciy GMOed Tree Nuts" labels.

    --
    "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
    • (Score: 2) by mcgrew on Saturday January 24 2015, @02:35PM

      by mcgrew (701) <publish@mcgrewbooks.com> on Saturday January 24 2015, @02:35PM (#137620) Homepage Journal

      The one that REALLY amuses me is "GLUTEN FREE!!!" as if gluten was some sort of poison. Guess what? Gluten is only a problem if you have celiac disease, a rare genetic disorder. It has as much meaning to a normal person as "low calorie" has to a skinny guy like me who would like to add a few pounds.

      --
      Free Martian whores! [mcgrewbooks.com]
      • (Score: 2) by nitehawk214 on Tuesday January 27 2015, @05:27PM

        by nitehawk214 (1304) on Tuesday January 27 2015, @05:27PM (#138581)

        At least it is something measurable and actually makes a difference to someone.

        "Certified Organic", now that is a load of bullshit right there. At least they used organic fertilizer.

        --
        "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
        • (Score: 2) by mcgrew on Wednesday January 28 2015, @01:52PM

          by mcgrew (701) <publish@mcgrewbooks.com> on Wednesday January 28 2015, @01:52PM (#138858) Homepage Journal

          There has been a lot of criticism of the word "organic", but that word has more than just the chemical meaning. OED: "(Of food or farming methods) produced or involving production without the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, or other artificial agents." Of course, it also gives the scientific definition.

          Criticism should go towards those who use use "organic" as a meaningless buzzword. If you use glyphosate and call your crop "organic" you're a liar. Of course, true organic farming uses a lot of real, physical bullshit.

          --
          Free Martian whores! [mcgrewbooks.com]
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 23 2015, @11:15PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 23 2015, @11:15PM (#137470)

    [Labeling] [...] has ceased to be meaningful

    In California, you'll see one of these on the front door of e.g. Starbuck's.
    Prop 65 warning [kqed.org]

    The anybody-can-make-up-a-law thing can really turn up some poorly-educated folks who shouldn't be doing that.

    -- gewg_

  • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Saturday January 24 2015, @12:56AM

    by HiThere (866) on Saturday January 24 2015, @12:56AM (#137496) Journal

    FWIW, I bought a bag of almonds that had the warning "Caution: may contain nuts".

    I blame the intersection of the lawyers and the court system.

    --
    Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
    • (Score: 1) by ncc74656 on Saturday January 24 2015, @06:18PM

      by ncc74656 (4917) on Saturday January 24 2015, @06:18PM (#137654) Homepage

      FWIW, I bought a bag of almonds that had the warning "Caution: may contain nuts".

      The jug of milk in my refrigerator has this line on the label:

      Ingredients: Milk, Vitamin D3. Contains: Milk.

      A jug of milk contains milk? No sh*t, Sherlock. If it didn't, I'd take it back and complain.

      Lawyers will be the death of us if they're not brought under control.

  • (Score: 2) by MichaelDavidCrawford on Saturday January 24 2015, @08:06AM

    by MichaelDavidCrawford (2339) Subscriber Badge <mdcrawford@gmail.com> on Saturday January 24 2015, @08:06AM (#137574) Homepage Journal

    A little girl recently died because she accidentally ate a cookie that had peanut butter in it. She knew what was going to happen, begged her parents to save her life. Her parents were prepared with three Epipens - spring-loaded, automatic Epinephrine syringes - but just three injections failed to save her.

    In less than twenty minutes, she perished in horrible agony right in front of her stricken parents.

    You know how little children can be. I really have no idea but speculate that it was no accident that she was given that particular cookie.

    --
    Yes I Have No Bananas. [gofundme.com]
    • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Saturday January 24 2015, @09:21AM

      by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Saturday January 24 2015, @09:21AM (#137584) Journal

      The label "can contain traces of nuts" could be helpful to allergic people if it were only put on food which has a non-negligible chance to contain traces of nuts.

      --
      The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.