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posted by janrinok on Wednesday March 27, @10:26PM   Printer-friendly
from the beatings-shall-continue-until-morale-improves dept.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2024/03/job-flexibility-and-security-linked-to-better-mental-health-among-workers/

American workers who have more flexibility and security in their jobs also have better mental health, according to a study of 2021 survey data from over 18,000 nationally representative working Americans.

The study, published Monday in JAMA Network Open, may not be surprising to those who have faced return-to-office mandates and rounds of layoffs amid the pandemic. But, it offers clear data on just how important job flexibility and security are to the health and well-being of workers.

[...] Overall, the study's findings indicate "the substantive impact that flexible and secure jobs can have on mental health in the short-term and long-term," the researchers conclude.

They do note limitations of the study, the main one being that the study identifies associations and can't determine that job flexibility and security directly caused mental health outcomes and the work absence findings. Still, they suggest that workplace policies could improve the mental health of employees.


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 28, @12:03PM (5 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 28, @12:03PM (#1350665)

    Point taken. Vanity.

    Think we are better than everyone else? Guilty. We did.

    I think it's whether one derived enjoyment from the work itself, or whether it's the money. A Maslow thing.

    Personally, I've been happiest where we loved what we were doing, but maybe we could have got more pay elsewhere. But who cared? We liked the lifestyle. One I was in for a while...a bunch of single guys. No wives ( well, no one wanted one ). We just did our thing. We lived it. We made some really unusual things. Our customers knew what we did and came to us. We weren't so encumbered with bureaucracy that we couldn't get anything done. We built a lot of proof-of-concept stuff. One of a kind thing.

    But eventually we got too well known. Money spoke. We died mired in bureaucracy. Everybody lost. The goose that laid the golden eggs was now officially dead. The investors were thinking bountiful ROI. What we all got was a heap of dead goose.

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by JoeMerchant on Thursday March 28, @02:00PM (4 children)

    by JoeMerchant (3937) on Thursday March 28, @02:00PM (#1350680)

    >The investors were thinking bountiful ROI. What we all got was a heap of dead goose.

    Serious question: the original company staff got dead goose, but did the investors actually lose anything?

    Twice I have spun up companies to be run by investment bankers.

    Twice I waved goodbye, holding a few shares of stock, as the company ventured forth under their (toxic, both times) management.

    Twice, the investment banker management ran the company for 10-ish years, made back their investment plus decent (+10-ish% annual) returns, decided it wasn't profitable enough for them, pulled shenanigans devaluing the original investor shares plus whatever they floated in their IPOs to zero, then liquidated.

    See: debt takes precedence over equity, and when you're an investment BANK managing the company you can have the company take loans from your bank, then get the value of the company declared less than or equal to the debt you hold and reorganize with a net share value of zero: checks for $0.01 distributed to all shareholders. You can also pull a fast Chapter 11->7 exit and leave your customers holding hundreds of millions of dollars of now worthless junk that was supposed to be doing a better job of treating difficult cancer cases for decades to come. All the while, the people "managing" these bankruptcy transition proceedings are being compensated at $500 to $1500 per HOUR from the company's remaining assets for their time spent on the proceedings.

    --
    🌻🌻 [google.com]
    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Freeman on Thursday March 28, @02:17PM (3 children)

      by Freeman (732) on Thursday March 28, @02:17PM (#1350683) Journal

      That's the kind of thing that should be illegal.

      --
      Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
      • (Score: 3, Interesting) by JoeMerchant on Thursday March 28, @02:40PM (2 children)

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Thursday March 28, @02:40PM (#1350687)

        That's the kind of thing that Maryland law protects.

        Twice, the Florida based companies being invested in by New York based bankers were incorporated in Maryland.

        --
        🌻🌻 [google.com]
        • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Freeman on Thursday March 28, @02:57PM (1 child)

          by Freeman (732) on Thursday March 28, @02:57PM (#1350695) Journal

          Ah, the bastion of freedom that state is. You'd think with it being so close to D. C. oh, wait, nevermind.

          --
          Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"