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posted by martyb on Saturday October 12 2019, @01:20AM   Printer-friendly
from the for-some-values-of-phenomenal dept.

We Played Modern Games on a CRT Monitor - and the Results are Phenomenal :

It's true. Running modern games on a vintage CRT monitor produces absolutely outstanding results - subjectively superior to anything from the LCD era, up to and including the latest OLED displays. Best suited for PC players, getting an optimal CRT set-up isn't easy, and prices vary dramatically, but the results can be simply phenomenal.

The advantages of CRT technology over modern flat panels are well-documented. CRTs do not operate from a fixed pixel grid in the way an LCD does - instead three 'guns' beam light directly onto the tube. So there's no upscaling blur and no need to run at any specific native resolution as such. On lower resolutions, you may notice 'scan lines' more readily, but the fact is that even lower resolution game outputs like 1024x768 or 1280x960 can look wonderful. Of course, higher-end CRTs can input and process higher resolutions, but the main takeaway here is that liberation from a set native resolution is a gamechanger - why spend so many GPU resources on the amount of pixels drawn when you can concentrate on quality instead without having to worry about upscale blurring?

Are there any Soylentils here who still use a CRT for gaming? If I could just find a CRT with a 65-inch diagonal, and a table that could support the weight...


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  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by SomeGuy on Saturday October 12 2019, @02:58AM (11 children)

    by SomeGuy (5632) on Saturday October 12 2019, @02:58AM (#906184)

    They shoot X-rays at you.

    Uh, no they don't. At least not enough to be concerned about. If you are that paranoid about that sort of thing, you probably never step outside or fly on an airplane.

    They give off a high-pitched whine that tortures people with young ears.

    The better ones from the late 1990s and 200x's usually didn't unless there was a malfunction. It seems like you probably had some cheap third rate CRT monitor, and that was unfortunate.

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  • (Score: 0, Disagree) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 12 2019, @03:13AM (5 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 12 2019, @03:13AM (#906198)

    Yes, they do. You can prove the existence of the x-rays by using math, which is not a neutral subject.

    Looking at math as "neutral" subject really harmed my heart. As a young adult, I began wanting mathematical "proof" of God's existence. I'd been taught, ever so subtly, to trust _math_ and _man_, rather than realizing that math's very existence testified to a Creator.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 12 2019, @03:19AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 12 2019, @03:19AM (#906202)

      Sounds like you took one too many x-ray photons in the brain. Better get that checked out.

    • (Score: 5, Touché) by Azuma Hazuki on Saturday October 12 2019, @05:55AM (1 child)

      by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Saturday October 12 2019, @05:55AM (#906243) Journal

      Oh good grief, mathematical Platonism? I thought that died out after people finished the 100-level philosophy courses and put the bong down...

      --
      I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
      • (Score: 4, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 12 2019, @12:22PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 12 2019, @12:22PM (#906308)

        Nobody puts the bong /down/ after the 100-level philosophy courses. Unless they're picking a needle up...

    • (Score: 1) by khallow on Saturday October 12 2019, @02:00PM

      by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Saturday October 12 2019, @02:00PM (#906320) Journal

      You can prove the existence of the x-rays by using math, which is not a neutral subject.

      Then clearly the problem is that you exist in a universe where such math is possible. Better move to one where that isn't so.

      Anything other problems the internet can fix while you're still here?

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by toddestan on Saturday October 12 2019, @04:02PM

      by toddestan (4982) Subscriber Badge on Saturday October 12 2019, @04:02PM (#906362)

      What little xrays come from a CRT usually come out of the back. All that leaded glass (remember how heavy they are) protects you while viewing from the front. The later ones even more so, as to make a flat CRT the glass has to be even thicker.

  • (Score: 0, Disagree) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 12 2019, @03:15AM (4 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 12 2019, @03:15AM (#906199)

    Uh, no they don't. At least not enough to be concerned about.

    OMG, some guy just admitted CRTs do in fact shoot x-rays at us! Teach the controversy!

    • (Score: 2, Informative) by RandomFactor on Saturday October 12 2019, @04:42AM (3 children)

      by RandomFactor (3682) Subscriber Badge on Saturday October 12 2019, @04:42AM (#906234) Journal

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2787304/ [nih.gov]

      https://emfacademy.com/computer-monitor-radiation-everything-you-need-to-know/ [emfacademy.com]

      In summary, yes CRTs, particularly those manufactured prior to around 2001, leaked Xrays and potentially enough to cause actual harm. I remember monitors being sold as low emission for a while in the early 2000s. Of course, once companies figured out LCD monitors paid for themselves in power savings they went away in relatively short order.

      --
      В «Правде» нет известий, в «Известиях» нет правды
      • (Score: 2) by SomeGuy on Saturday October 12 2019, @12:11PM

        by SomeGuy (5632) on Saturday October 12 2019, @12:11PM (#906304)

        You are sure these are not just FUD pieces designed to sell LCD monitors?

      • (Score: 2) by Joe Desertrat on Sunday October 13 2019, @12:13AM (1 child)

        by Joe Desertrat (2454) Subscriber Badge on Sunday October 13 2019, @12:13AM (#906469)

        A cousin of mine worked for a lab in which they tested the radiation emitted by products the company was designing. I'm not privy to information about exactly what products he was testing, but he worked in a division that was working on the about to explode (not literally of course) home and business PC market. Anyway, we shared an apartment. I worked evenings, so I was home during the day. I listened to college radio stations of which we lived at the farthest extent of their range. He would frequently come home for lunch, and as soon as he walked in the door reception for the radio stations was obliterated by static. Reception would resume when he went back to work. Thankfully, he only worked in that department a short time, but I have to wonder what damage it did to him.

        • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 13 2019, @07:33AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 13 2019, @07:33AM (#906567)

          Whatever it was it wasn't x-rays. They are not persistent. You could x-ray someone into a puddle of goo on the floor and as soon as you turned off the machine the radio would work fine. If he was doing neutron analysis and emitting that much induced radiation he is either dead or a superhero now.

          Did his vehicle have an electric fan that started up after he turned off the engine? Small electric motors are great static generators.
          Or maybe he just didn't like your choice of station and built a little static generator.