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posted by Fnord666 on Saturday July 25 2020, @05:13PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the UPC-seal-of-approval dept.

brexit means brexit

UK formally abandons Europe's Unified Patent Court, Germany plans to move forward nevertheless:

The UK has formally ditched the Unified Patent Court (UPC), a project to create a single pan-European patent system that would fix the confusing mess of contradictory laws currently in place.

In a written statement in the House of Commons on Monday, the British undersecretary for science, research and innovation Amanda Solloway noted that: "Today, by means of a Note Verbale, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland has withdrawn its ratification of the Agreement on a Unified Patent Court."

The reason is, of course Brexit. "In view of the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union, the United Kingdom no longer wishes to be a party to the Unified Patent Court system. Participating in a court that applies EU law and is bound by the CJEU would be inconsistent with the Government's aims of becoming an independent self-governing nation," she said.

[...] The whole idea of the UPC has been fought for over a decade now, making many its adherents borderline fanatical in making it a reality, even more so given frequent setbacks. In their unerring support, however, many seem willing to overlook or turn a blind eye to serious problems, not least of which is the mess that is the European Patent Office (EPO).

[...] The EPO is, of course, a big fan of the UPC and insists the UK leaving is a mere trifle to the larger European dream of a single patent system; a system that would give it significantly more power:

"These economic benefits for European companies and especially SMEs will not be affected by the announcement of the United Kingdom," it insisted in its submission to the German government.

"Even without the UK, the UP package will lead to significant simplification and cost reduction for the companies of the participating EU member states, which is also largely recognized by European companies."


Original Submission

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FFII Calls for Donations Against Unitary Software Patent Trolls After a Disastrous Bundestag Vote 53 comments

The Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure has a call for donations against the Unitary Software Patent Trolls after Thursday's disastrous Bundestag vote. On Thursday in Germany, the Bundestag voted on ratification of a proposal for a Unified Patent Court, largely seen as purely a vehicle for introducing software patents into Europe. As software patents in the US were on the way out, introducing them into Europe would bring them back into the US after further "harmonization". Thursday's vote is the result of the software patent lobby changing its strategy in Europe by creating a central patent court outside of the control of the individual member states under which it would make its own rules and avoid democratically elected legislators.

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  • (Score: 1) by fustakrakich on Saturday July 25 2020, @05:20PM (8 children)

    by fustakrakich (6150) on Saturday July 25 2020, @05:20PM (#1026196) Journal

    Better if we break it up further then. The last thing we need is to give patents and copyright more power

    --
    Ok, we paid the ransom. Do I get my dog back? REDЯUM
    • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:02PM (6 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:02PM (#1026202)

      Were you always this fucking stupid, nigger? We should abolish patents and copyright altogether. End government-backed monopolies that interfere with the free market.

      • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:07PM (5 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:07PM (#1026206)

        Yeah... China will make the same invention for 1/100th the price. Free trade!

        • (Score: 3, Insightful) by anubi on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:31PM (2 children)

          by anubi (2828) on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:31PM (#1026312) Journal

          I've heard "privilege of rank" bandied around...

          This I'd China's "privilege of sovereignty".

          We make laws to cripple ourselves.

          China builds things.

          Can I blame them?

          --
          "Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." [KJV: I Thessalonians 5:21]
          • (Score: 4, Funny) by anubi on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:35PM (1 child)

            by anubi (2828) on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:35PM (#1026314) Journal

            Forgive my bad syntax, please.

            I'm trying to post with a phone's autocorrector in the loop.

            It's a constant reminder that we are not ready for self driving cats.

            --
            "Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." [KJV: I Thessalonians 5:21]
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @02:35AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @02:35AM (#1026411)

              Cats don't drive. They have chauffeurs.

        • (Score: 2) by sjames on Sunday July 26 2020, @01:40PM (1 child)

          by sjames (2882) on Sunday July 26 2020, @01:40PM (#1026561) Journal

          This is something worth a much closer look. Everyone gets hung up on poor pay and long hours in china, but that's not even half of the difference. There's a whole herd of elephants in the room. Double their pay and things direct from china are still less than half the cost of products from american companies. The new $1000 iPhones could be sold for about $400+shipping and turn a profit.

          I'm using a Chinese 3D printer currently. It cost me $220. It's fully open source, including the technical drawings, but I couldn't even source the materials here for less than I paid for the whole printer. the design and construction is wide open. If I need to repair it, I can get the parts from pretty much anywhere. Easiest answer, search on amazon and pick which of 5 or ten vendors I want to buy it from. For example, the other day the plastic lever on the extruder (spring loaded, keeps the filament pinched against a drive gear). I went with an all aluminum replacement extruder assembly for $12. Took all of 15 minutes and zero swears to swap it in.

          Comparable U.S. made printer costs $1000 and has a useless plastic housing that would be at least 3 swears just to get it off so I can repair the thing.

          To really compete with China, we need to lose a lot of overhead more than we need to cut pay. Real estate costs, legal overhead, business overhead, etc. Those solid mahogany conference tables in huge conference rooms in the middle of the most expensive real estate in the U.S. don't come cheap. Executives may need to go back to only making 300% more than the average pay, like they did in the '50s.

          Cut some of that out and they won't need a 500 percent markup to be filthy rich.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @02:51PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @02:51PM (#1026582)

            To really compete with China, we need to lose a lot of overhead more than we need to cut pay. Real estate costs, legal overhead, business overhead, etc. Those solid mahogany conference tables in huge conference rooms in the middle of the most expensive real estate in the U.S. don't come cheap. Executives may need to go back to only making 300% more than the average pay, like they did in the '50s.

            This. The effect real estate becoming an investment vehicle for a rent seeking class has on entrepreneurship and wealth is disastrous. Framing the rise of kleptocratic financialization as a disaster of capitalism is an absurdity predominately understood by the productive (ie: wealth creating) members of society. Rent controls are an aberration but there's a strong argument to be made (on both sides of the political debate) for progressive taxation on reckless corporate profiteering from property. [nypost.com]

    • (Score: 4, Informative) by canopic jug on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:06PM

      by canopic jug (3949) Subscriber Badge on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:06PM (#1026205) Journal

      The last thing we need is to give patents and copyright more power

      The death of the UPC [techrights.org] through the loss of the UK from Europe was confirmed this way at the beginning of the year. That was one small benefit of Brexit, perhaps the only one. It may be a few years before the crooks pushing for it can regroup and try some other way to sneak software patents into Europe. The UPC was mainly intended as a way of doing an end run around European laws in order to impose software patents. The 1973 European Patent Convention specifically excludes software from patent law, leaving copyright for that.

      Now that Groklaw is in archive mode and the other sites have either shut down or changed topics, Roy at Techrights has really been the last one to cover the UPC [techrights.org] or, for that matter, the profoundly corrupt EPO [techrights.org] which has been pushing for the UPC.

      The UPC is dead, but the crowd pushing for it has not been jailed yet. So keep your eyes open for further developments and possible need to defend software use (and development) in the EU.

      --
      Money is not free speech. Elections should not be auctions.
  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:04PM (32 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:04PM (#1026204)

    Notice how often the EU uses the word "Europe" to refer to itself, as if they are the representatives of the entire continent. As if the EU is inescapable and inevitable. As if any European country not a member of the EU doesn't exist.

    The EU will ultimately fail in its grand aims like all poorly thought out utopias.

    • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:26PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:26PM (#1026210)

      While (((they))) force member nations to replace actual Europeans with Arabs and Africans.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @08:18AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @08:18AM (#1026495)

        > ... to replace actual Europeans with Arabs and Africans.

        Islam is not a race. Don't distract from the real attack on Europe by switching to unrelated topics. The politicians may even encourage the illegal criticism of race to hide the more dangerous core problem of the resurgence of violent supremacist political movements nazism and islam.

    • (Score: 3, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:32PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @06:32PM (#1026211)

      Incidentally, it is quite common for people to mean USA when they simply say America. Does Trump mean both the American continents when he mentions MAGA?

      • (Score: 1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:32PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:32PM (#1026232)

        The plural "Americas" exists, it's not widely used because nobody gives a shit about South America or Canada.

    • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:00PM (23 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:00PM (#1026219)

      The EU is the new USSR. We must stand up against their tyranny and attempts to impose their laws and will on the rest of the world.

      • (Score: 2, Flamebait) by looorg on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:20PM (14 children)

        by looorg (578) on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:20PM (#1026224)

        I'm not super happy about it really. Current EU, and future EU, is not the EU most people voted about joining -- it started out as a sort of trade union but has now moved in a very disturbing direction I'm not sure I really want to be a part of at all. I was sort of hoping Brexit would have gone smoother and it would have rippled thru the northern parts of Europe to just ditch this crap cause this just isn't what was the plan. I'm also more scared that it's turning more into the new USSR then another say United States.

        • (Score: 2, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:16PM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:16PM (#1026281)

          Some former members of the USSR are now in the EU. Would you like to ask them to compare?

          No need - someone already has [independent.co.uk].

          But keep on asking that DUMB ass question for another 4 years - maybe you'll finally read the answer.

          • (Score: 2, Troll) by looorg on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:32PM

            by looorg (578) on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:32PM (#1026294)

            I have already asked some of them since I worked with several people that left USSR. They liked it when they came here but are now seeing how the EU is changing and not for the better. I guess people can draw different conclusions about situations sometimes.

        • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Grishnakh on Sunday July 26 2020, @02:48AM (11 children)

          by Grishnakh (2831) on Sunday July 26 2020, @02:48AM (#1026417)

          Current EU, and future EU, is not the EU most people voted about joining -- it started out as a sort of trade union but has now moved in a very disturbing direction I'm not sure I really want to be a part of at all.

          What exactly were you expecting, a confederation? Those don't work in real life. The United States tried that back in 1777, and it was a disaster. The Articles of Confederation only lasted 12 years until it was replaced with the Constitution, which created a far stronger central government. You can't have a confederacy with different member states having very different laws and monetary systems, and keep it together. The EU realized this, and created the "Euro" and tried to unify their monetary systems, but without a unified political system it isn't working that well because some countries used to manage themselves very differently than others (Greece vs. Germany). Now under the EU, countries like Greece haven't been allowed to just print more money like before, so they've had austerity forced on them by Germany and France, causing a lot of problems. We haven't had that problem in the US because we have a single federal government that controls monetary policy, and states really have no power over this at all.

          The simple fact is that confederations just don't work (unless you're Switzerland, and even they have a single currency and monetary policy so it's not the same). And just having a trade union like the EEC was before the EU was formed really doesn't give you much power on the world stage; the EU could never be any kind of world power like China or the US without becoming a much stronger union, and enjoy the economic benefits that come from that power. Without unity, there's just too much economic friction internally, from currency exchanges, customs fees and regulations, etc.

          • (Score: 1, Troll) by looorg on Sunday July 26 2020, @03:09AM

            by looorg (578) on Sunday July 26 2020, @03:09AM (#1026431)

            That is a core issue here. They want a union of countries that had no business being in a union with each other due to vastly different circumstances. So what we ended up with is a system where a few countries are more or less paying for other countries that have shit economies just to be in a club together, but getting very little out of it. It's probably great if you are Germany or France, less great if you are not.

          • (Score: 1) by khallow on Sunday July 26 2020, @01:03PM (9 children)

            by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Sunday July 26 2020, @01:03PM (#1026555) Journal

            What exactly were you expecting, a confederation? Those don't work in real life.

            Depends on what you're trying to do with it. And the present day EU is a confederation FWIW.

            • (Score: 2) by Grishnakh on Sunday July 26 2020, @07:26PM (8 children)

              by Grishnakh (2831) on Sunday July 26 2020, @07:26PM (#1026702)

              >And the present day EU is a confederation FWIW.

              It is, and it's not working that well, nor does it seem like it's going to survive in its present form for too long. It's just like the US under the AoC: it managed to hang on for 12 years before they finally gave up because it was so ineffective. I predict the same will happen with the EU; they're going to have to make the central government stronger to keep the union together, or they'll just break apart, with Brexit already being the tip of the iceberg.

              Basically, with politics like this, you have to decide whether you want more unity or more independence. There's benefits to both, and downsides. Unity = strength: you don't see any tiny little independent nations that have lots of economic clout. There are a few that manage to do well for themselves because they have powerful allies and rich natural resources (Norway is a big example here; if it weren't for all their oil/gas wealth they'd be a backwater and would probably be joining the EU), but most small, independent countries don't really do that well economically because they're just too small. The US is an example of the converse: it's very large, and uses that size (population), along with the natural resources that come with controlling that much land area, to create an enormous amount of power on the world stage, and then use that power to create even more economic benefits through controlling trade, and using its massive military power to suppress competition and keep trade on its terms and also have the world's reserve currency. But there's a cost to that unity: lots of internal friction between different interests and political groups inside, which are currently threatening to rip the country apart. The US just break up and become 50 different countries, with a few of those combining perhaps, but it wouldn't have remotely as much power as the whole, and China and Russia would end up becoming the new dominant powers on the planet. The EU countries by themselves wouldn't have much power to stop Russian aggression, which is why they need unity, but the way they're going about it now just isn't very effective and various members are feeling disenfranchised, threatening to destroy the union.

              • (Score: 1) by khallow on Monday July 27 2020, @01:41AM (7 children)

                by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Monday July 27 2020, @01:41AM (#1026907) Journal
                I agree, but only because they're trying for a much tighter union without getting enough people on board or reigning in various countries. A trade union would have worked out because failings or intrigues in one country don't endanger the whole thing.
                • (Score: 2) by Grishnakh on Monday July 27 2020, @09:07PM (6 children)

                  by Grishnakh (2831) on Monday July 27 2020, @09:07PM (#1027302)

                  A simple trade union is what they had before, called the Schengen Zone. It was an improvement over separate customs borders between every country, but there was still a lot of internal friction because of the lack of a common currency and more harmonization of regulations between member states. Obviously, that wasn't good enough for them, which is why they formed the EU instead.

                  The root of the problem is that too many people want the huge economic benefits that come from unity, but they don't want to make the sacrifices to sovereignty that are required by it. You can't have it both ways. If you want independence and sovereignty, then you can't be part of a union, and everyone's going to have to negotiate trade deals separately with you, and you'll always be paying fees for currency exchange and customs for every economic transaction you make outside your country (which is going to be most transactions when your country is small and not self-sufficient and has to trade for everything). If you want the benefits that come from free trade with other member states, and a shared currency that's a heavyweight on the international stage, then you have to give up your sovereignty.

                  • (Score: 1) by khallow on Monday July 27 2020, @11:23PM (5 children)

                    by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Monday July 27 2020, @11:23PM (#1027384) Journal

                    The root of the problem is that too many people want the huge economic benefits that come from unity, but they don't want to make the sacrifices to sovereignty that are required by it. You can't have it both ways.

                    Actually you can. Unity doesn't magically provide economic benefits and its absence doesn't magically take them away. Here, the Schengen Area has provided most of the economic benefits of the present EU, the only real exceptions being the common currency and removal of tariffs (I don't include the state of peace in Europe either since it came about well before the EU did), neither which needs the authority of the EU to implement. So we have a lot of unity looking for a purpose and not finding it yet.

                    • (Score: 2) by Grishnakh on Tuesday July 28 2020, @08:59PM (4 children)

                      by Grishnakh (2831) on Tuesday July 28 2020, @08:59PM (#1027774)

                      Here, the Schengen Area has provided most of the economic benefits of the present EU, the only real exceptions being the common currency and removal of tariffs

                      You mention those as if they're small things, and they just aren't. Having no tariffs and a common currency is absolutely necessary for being a world power. There's a reason the Norwegian Krone isn't a major world currency, and the American Dollar and the Euro are.

                      neither which needs the authority of the EU to implement

                      Absolutely wrong. You can't just create a shared currency and use it; you have to have a central government and a central bank to control the currency and set monetary policy. This is the whole reason there was a Eurozone crisis a few years ago: member states were bickering over the monetary policy, with certain states (like Greece and Portugal) wanting a very different policy from economically stronger states.

                      • (Score: 1) by khallow on Tuesday July 28 2020, @11:02PM (3 children)

                        by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday July 28 2020, @11:02PM (#1027823) Journal

                        You mention those as if they're small things

                        I called them "real exceptions".

                        Absolutely wrong. You can't just create a shared currency and use it

                        Actually, yes, you can. It's not rocket science.

                        you have to have a central government and a central bank to control the currency and set monetary policy.

                        The central bank is the central government for the currency. They're not that hard to set up and don't take a lot of sovereignty.

                        This is the whole reason there was a Eurozone crisis a few years ago: member states were bickering over the monetary policy, with certain states (like Greece and Portugal) wanting a very different policy from economically stronger states.

                        Conflict of interest always is a thing. It doesn't matter the degree of unity.

                        • (Score: 2) by Grishnakh on Wednesday July 29 2020, @12:25AM (2 children)

                          by Grishnakh (2831) on Wednesday July 29 2020, @12:25AM (#1027889)

                          >Actually, yes, you can. It's not rocket science.

                          Do you have any real-world examples? If not, then I reject your assertion.

                          >The central bank is the central government for the currency. They're not that hard to set up and don't take a lot of sovereignty.

                          And who runs the central bank? What kind of government is going to sign up to use a currency they have zero control over? I can think of one example: Zimbabwe (they use the American Dollar). That's not a very good example: that's a very troubled country that had extreme hyperinflation and switched to the USD for stability.

                          • (Score: 1) by khallow on Wednesday July 29 2020, @02:36AM (1 child)

                            by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday July 29 2020, @02:36AM (#1027952) Journal

                            Do you have any real-world examples?

                            Wikipedia claims over four thousand private currencies. And there's the digital currencies which have been used for substantial trading and usually have no central bank in the first place.

      • (Score: 4, Insightful) by turgid on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:44PM (7 children)

        by turgid (4318) Subscriber Badge on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:44PM (#1026237) Journal

        The EU is the new USSR.

        I have friends and colleagues from all over the world, including former Eastern Block (USSR) countries such as Romania, Bulgaria, Poland and Hungary. They are highly intelligent people and some are old enough to remember life under Communism and their parents certainly do. The are all pro-EU and are absolutely shocked and astounded that the UK has fallen for this divisive propaganda and has left the EU. The EU is nothing like the USSR.

        • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @08:28PM (2 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @08:28PM (#1026257)
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:25PM (1 child)

            by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:25PM (#1026288)

            Why don't you listen to the 1hr audio and find the quote that you tell us support your position? Thanks.

            • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:03PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:03PM (#1026308)

              I did not assert a position but since you're interested, here's some excepts from a Brussels speech Bukovsky made in 2006.

              In 1992 I had unprecedented access to Politburo and Central Committee secret documents which have been classified, and still are even now, for 30 years. These documents show very clearly that the whole idea of turning the European common market into a federal state was agreed between the left-wing parties of Europe and Moscow as a joint project which [Soviet leader Mikhail] Gorbachev in 1988-89 called our "common European home."

              The idea was very simple. It first came up in 1985-86, when the Italian Communists visited Gorbachev, followed by the German Social-Democrats. They all complained that the changes in the world, particularly after [British Prime Minister Margaret] Thatcher introduced privatisation and economic liberalisation, were threatening to wipe out the achievement (as they called it) of generations of Socialists and Social-Democrats – threatening to reverse it completely. Therefore the only way to withstand this onslaught of wild capitalism (as they called it) was to try to introduce the same socialist goals in all countries at once. Prior to that, the left-wing parties and the Soviet Union had opposed European integration very much because they perceived it as a means to block their socialist goals. From 1985 onwards they completely changed their view. The Soviets came to a conclusion and to an agreement with the left-wing parties that if they worked together they could hijack the whole European project and turn it upside down. Instead of an open market they would turn it into a federal state.

              It is no accident that the European Parliament, for example, reminds me of the Supreme Soviet. It looks like the Supreme Soviet because it was designed like it. Similary, when you look at the European Commission it looks like the Politburo. I mean it does so exactly, except for the fact that the Commission now has 25 members and the Politburo usually had 13 or 15 members. Apart from that they are exactly the same, unaccountable to anyone, not directly elected by anyone at all. When you look into all this bizarre activity of the European Union with its 80,000 pages of regulations it looks like Gosplan. We used to have an organisation which was planning everything in the economy, to the last nut and bolt, five years in advance. Exactly the same thing is happening in the EU. When you look at the type of EU corruption, it is exactly the Soviet type of corruption, going from top to bottom rather than going from bottom to top.

        • (Score: 3, Troll) by rleigh on Saturday July 25 2020, @08:48PM (3 children)

          by rleigh (4887) on Saturday July 25 2020, @08:48PM (#1026261) Homepage

          "The most puzzling development in modern politics is the apparent determination of Western European leaders to re-create the Soviet Union in Western Europe" -- Mikhail Gorbachev.

          • (Score: 2) by turgid on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:25PM (2 children)

            by turgid (4318) Subscriber Badge on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:25PM (#1026311) Journal

            The most puzzling development in modern politics is the apparent attempt to recreate North Korra in the UK.

            • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:34PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @10:34PM (#1026313)

              Sounds right up your Korranation Street.

            • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @05:16PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @05:16PM (#1026632)

              The Brits and the Yanks tend to follow the same trends. Trump, Brexit, they share all the same redneck bullshit. If not for Quebec, you would see the same in Canada, only there they are trying to recreate Alberta...

              Too bad Australia isn't Irish, eh?

    • (Score: 3, Funny) by turgid on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:45PM (3 children)

      by turgid (4318) Subscriber Badge on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:45PM (#1026239) Journal

      The EU will ultimately fail in its grand aims like all poorly thought out utopias.

      The USA will ultimately fail in its grand aims like all poorly thought out utopias.

      See what I did there?

      • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:27PM (2 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:27PM (#1026289)

        You read the news about Portland and predicted the present?

        • (Score: 3, Insightful) by dry on Sunday July 26 2020, @04:51PM (1 child)

          by dry (223) on Sunday July 26 2020, @04:51PM (#1026618) Journal

          Electing a reality TV star was a sign.

          • (Score: 2, Insightful) by fustakrakich on Sunday July 26 2020, @05:26PM

            by fustakrakich (6150) on Sunday July 26 2020, @05:26PM (#1026636) Journal

            The 50 year long introduction had flashing lights!

            --
            Ok, we paid the ransom. Do I get my dog back? REDЯUM
  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by turgid on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:38PM

    by turgid (4318) Subscriber Badge on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:38PM (#1026234) Journal

    Participating in a court that applies EU law and is bound by the CJEU would be inconsistent with the Government's aims of becoming an independent self-governing nation," she said.

    The Alt-Wrong propaganda Newspeak of the Kippers, Faragists and ERG has now made its way into actual government.

    The UK was always self-governing (within the EU) as are the other 27 member countries.

    As for independence, well, technically we were independent, as are the other 27 countries. They are "sovereign countries" and proud of it.

    "Participating in a court that applies EU law and is bound by the CJEU..." See, that's one of the things about cooperating with other countries on things like trade, intellectual properties, food safety, environmental protection and so on, you need to agree a legal framework that everyone can accept and abide by. There are not imposed by some malevolent foreign dictators. These are agreements designed by, developed by, agreed by and implemented by cooperating partners, as equals, democratically. The EU, for example, provides quite an efficient and fair democratic system for such things.

    Of course, this is all lost on the Kippers, Faragists, ERG and "patriot" types.

    They'll get a shock when we (UK) do our "trade deal" with the USA where we essentially hand over some of our sovereignty to American courts and corporate lobbyists who will arbitrate in any trade disputes.

    This is freedumb, dimocracy and British Sovereign Tea. Rule Britannia etc. Support for Scottish independence is now polling at 54% and rising.

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by turgid on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:54PM (1 child)

    by turgid (4318) Subscriber Badge on Saturday July 25 2020, @07:54PM (#1026243) Journal

    We've cut ourselves out of our nearest trading bloc which also happens to be the most successful in the world. We've upset the Chinese, who have huge economic influence in our country, and we're looking to cozy up to the Tangerine Terror in the Whitehouse. Hormone beef, chlorinated chicken, GMO cereal and a fully outsourced NHS here we come!

    Work has already started on the 27-acre Farage Garage [theneweuropean.co.uk] for all the lorries waiting to cross the Channel next year when the Withdrawal Agreement runs out.

    And as for the Russia report? Well, there was no evidence because they didn't look for any [independent.co.uk].

    Support for Scottish independence is now polling at 54%.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by PartTimeZombie on Sunday July 26 2020, @01:47AM

      by PartTimeZombie (4827) Subscriber Badge on Sunday July 26 2020, @01:47AM (#1026395)

      See, you've failed to understand how the EU is worse the the Soviet Union, because an Internet troll says it is.

      The fact the said Internet troll has never left the mid-west American state he lives in, and thinks New York is a foreign city is beside the point. As we all know, when Fox News tells us how Europe has been taken over by brown people it must be true, because Fox News never lies, and has our best interests at heart.

  • (Score: -1, Spam) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @08:15PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @08:15PM (#1026249)

    See subject: hello again you rotten bastards. I'm back and this time I'm here to stay.

    * I hate niggers more than ever and I'm not ashamed of it one fucking bit. Fuck all kikes, too.

    Don't even think about trying your spam mod bullshit with me. I own this fucking shithole and you stupid niggers can't stop me. Fuck all of you rotten bastards & tranny kikes.

    APK

    P.S.=> All of you fuckers like martyb can go eat shit and die... apk

  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:30PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 25 2020, @09:30PM (#1026293)

    See subject: hello again you rotten bastards. I'm back and this time I'm here to stay.

    * I hate niggers more than ever and I'm not ashamed of it one fucking bit. Fuck all kikes, too.

    Don't even think about trying your spam mod bullshit with me. I own this fucking shithole and you stupid niggers can't stop me. I own this fucking shithole and you stupid niggers can't stop me. Fuck all of you rotten bastards & tranny kikes. You niggers can't hold a candle to anything I've accomplished.

    APK

    P.S.=> All of you fuckers like martyb can go eat shit and die... apk

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @12:17AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @12:17AM (#1026366)

    Huawei Fights Back

    "Looks like Huawei is going to fight back against the U.S. for the sanctions it has imposed on the company... using the U.S. patent system, which recently made some changes to FRAND agreements (fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory) to make it even easier to sue."

    https://yro.slashdot.org/story/20/07/14/2316236/huawei-fights-back [slashdot.org] [slashdot.org] [slashdot.org]

    I tried digging a little about what changes were made and this looks to be what is being discussed.

    Justice Department’s New Position on Patents, Standard Setting, and Injunctions

    "A FRAND commitment ... requires the patent owner to license to all participants in the standard upon payment of a FRAND royalty.
    ...

    In December 2019, the Justice Department, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology issued a formal policy statement on remedies for SEPs. The new statement declares that injunctions should be available for SEPs on the same terms as for patents generally. It also states in a footnote that the antitrust laws are not generally applicable to FRAND disputes."

    https://www.theregreview.org/2020/01/06/hovenkamp-justice-department-new-position-patents-standard-setting-injunctions/ [theregreview.org] [theregreview.org] [theregreview.org]

    This looks bad no? If companies wish to voluntarily enter into an agreement to cross license patents why should the government get to dictate the terms? No one is forcing anyone to enter into the agreement, if a patent holder doesn't like the terms of the agreement simply don't enter. This seems to go against contract law (but you will have all the IP zealots claiming that copy'right' is also about protecting contract law).

    Also how does not allowing SEPs to prohibit injunctions to those that voluntarily sign up to the SEPs help spur innovation. It would seem that prohibiting injunctions and requiring reasonable licensing rates to those that sign up would help spur innovation as it would allow more companies to benefit from being able to do more stuff instead of locking out everyone from being able to do anything. Isn't the point of patents to spur, and not to hinder, innovation? The individual inventor that doesn't want to sign up to the SEPs doesn't have to but if a collective group wants to pool their patents and agree not to sue each other for an injunction and to cross license with each other at reasonable rates then allowing them to voluntarily enter into such an agreement to do so would spur innovation. Them agreeing on their patents doesn't affect the person that doesn't wish to enter into the agreement in a way that harms overall innovation.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @12:41AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 26 2020, @12:41AM (#1026372)

      Uhm ... it looks like the original Slashdot post got removed, probably by accident while Slashdot was having all of those problems with their comments.

      Here is another link that links to the Slashdot article.

      https://shamelesslyplugged.blogspot.com/2020/07/slashdot-huawei-fights-back.html [blogspot.com]

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