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posted by martyb on Saturday May 20 2017, @07:36PM   Printer-friendly
from the shouting-questions-in-a-crowded-hallway dept.

John M. Donnelly, a senior writer at CQ Roll Call, said he was trying to talk with FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly one-on-one after a news conference when two plainclothes guards pinned him against a wall with the backs of their bodies.

Washington Post

“Not only did they get in between me and O’Rielly but they put their shoulders together and simultaneously backed me up into the wall and pinned me to the wall for about 10 seconds just as I started to say, “Commissioner O’Rielly, I have a question,” Donnelly said Friday.

Donnelly said he was stopped long enough to allow O’Rielly to walk away.

Los Angeles Times

Donnelly, who also happens to be chair of the National Press Club Press Freedom team, said he was then forced out of the building after being asked why he had not posed his question during the news conference.

O'Rielly apologized to Donnelly on Twitter, saying he didn't recognize Donnelly in the hallway. "I saw security put themselves between you, me and my staff. I didn't see anyone put a hand on you. I'm sorry this occurred."

Politico

According to the publication for which the reporter works (archived copy),

Senators, including Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley, are warning the Federal Communications Commission about its treatment of reporters after a CQ Roll Call reporter was manhandled Thursday.

“The Federal Communications Commission needs to take a hard look at why this happened and make sure it doesn’t happen again. As The Washington Post pointed out, it’s standard operating procedure for reporters to ask questions of public officials after meetings and news conferences,” the Iowa Republican said. “It happens all day, every day. There’s no good reason to put hands on a reporter who’s doing his or her job.”

Additional coverage:

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  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Runaway1956 on Saturday May 20 2017, @09:22PM (3 children)

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Saturday May 20 2017, @09:22PM (#512736) Homepage Journal

    I'm more interested in your justification for chasing an official down after he leaves a press conference, to interrogate him at your own leisure. There are established protocols for this stuff, you realize?

    --
    There is a supply side shortage of pronouns. You will take whatever you are offered.
    Starting Score:    1  point
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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 20 2017, @09:46PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 20 2017, @09:46PM (#512745)

    You never heard the term "public servant"?
    How about "I pay your salary"?

    I made a submission about a way to deal with Congresscritters who duck out on/avoid town hall meetings in their districts.
    With GOP Reps in Hiding After Trumpcare Vote, Dems "Adopt" Those Districts [soylentnews.org]

    -- OriginalOwner_ [soylentnews.org]

  • (Score: 5, Informative) by http on Saturday May 20 2017, @10:06PM (1 child)

    by http (1920) Subscriber Badge on Saturday May 20 2017, @10:06PM (#512750)

    You are almost right that there are protocols. FTFS:

    "...As The Washington Post pointed out, it’s standard operating procedure for reporters to ask questions of public officials after meetings and news conferences,”

    Just so there's no misunderstanding, the direct quote from the WP article: "Seeking to question officials after news conferences is standard practice for journalists in Washington."

    I know thinking is hard and thirty seconds is a long time, but please - do so before each post.

    --
    I browse at -1 when I have mod points. It's unsettling.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 21 2017, @09:10PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 21 2017, @09:10PM (#513157)

      That happens all the time with the president, doesn't it? What needs to happen, is for some papparazzi to be shot down like dogs, for harassing people. Then, the courts need to make sure that the body guards are acquitted. Put just a little chill on overly exuberant "reporters". If the low-life papparazzi deaths don't send the proper message, then the Secret Service can target a couple lower-caste "reporters" in Washington.