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posted by janrinok on Thursday December 07 2017, @01:05AM   Printer-friendly
from the and-a-polite-discussion-ensued... dept.

Recently published in Journal of Social and Political Psychology by Thomas F. Pettigrew seeks to understand the psychological profile of Trump supporters:

The Trump movement is not singular within the United States (the Know Nothing movement in the 1850s, the Wallace movement in the 1960s, and the more recent Tea Party Movement). Moreover, other democracies have seen similar movements (e.g., Austria's Freedom Party, Belgium's Vlaams Blok, France's National Front, Germany's Alternative for Germany Party (AfD), and Britain's U.K. Independence Party (UKIP).

In virtually all these cases, the tinder especially involved male nativists and populists who were less educated than the general population. But this core was joined by other types of voters as well. Five highly interrelated characteristics stand out that are central to a social psychological analysis – authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, outgroup prejudice, the absence of intergroup contact and relative deprivation.No one factor describes Trump's supporters. But an array of factors – many of them reflecting five major social psychological phenomena can help to account for this extraordinary political event: authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, prejudice, relative deprivation, and intergroup contact.


Original Submission

 
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  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by khallow on Thursday December 07 2017, @01:36AM (10 children)

    by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday December 07 2017, @01:36AM (#606522) Journal
    Anyone who has ever disagreed with me in the past, please reply to this post with a comprehensive list of your mental problems so that I can determine what the common mental flaws of my rhetorical opponents are for the good of humanity. If due to unfortunate circumstances you are unable or unwilling to reply, or your list is insufficiently comprehensive, we'll add the standard default category of delusional, narcissistic, moonbat autist. Then I'll show that the most common traits of people who disagree with me are that they are delusional, narcissist, moonbat autists.

    Let's put the pseudoscience theater of vilifying others via psychological interpretation on firm scientific grounds.
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  • (Score: 5, Funny) by stretch611 on Thursday December 07 2017, @01:46AM (7 children)

    by stretch611 (6199) Subscriber Badge on Thursday December 07 2017, @01:46AM (#606529)

    Why should we trust you to give an evaluation of us.... when you can't even see that the real flaw is yourself.

    --
    Not a Mega Millions Jackpot winner
    • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday December 07 2017, @02:07AM (3 children)

      by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday December 07 2017, @02:07AM (#606552) Journal
      I see you've volunteered for the default category (which alas, appears to be leading right now). And to answer your question, it's science.

      But I sense that presenting the results of this noble effort will be akin to casting pearls before swine (not that I've observed any swine giving inadequate appreciation to pearls, it's just the way the saying goes). Well, such research is as much about the public display of virtue (which is my gravitas-ridden contribution to this great work) as it is about this critical subject.
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 07 2017, @06:22PM (2 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 07 2017, @06:22PM (#606918)

        Ehhh, you talk a lot about science and reason but cling to your personal beliefs when the evidence is against you.

        Feck off ya bleedin idjit.

        • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday December 07 2017, @06:36PM (1 child)

          by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday December 07 2017, @06:36PM (#606930) Journal

          Ehhh, you talk a lot about science and reason but cling to your personal beliefs when the evidence is against you.

          Seeing as you are a delusional, narcissistic, moonbat autist, I wouldn't expect you to be able to understand the importance of my work. Sad.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday December 08 2017, @05:30PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Friday December 08 2017, @05:30PM (#607280)

            Importancr of your work, so now you're a narcissistic fool as well. Got a youtube channel yet?

    • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday December 07 2017, @02:17AM (2 children)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday December 07 2017, @02:17AM (#606563) Homepage Journal

      That is precisely the same question we are asking about the author - AND the submitter.

      --
      Your private safe room in the back of your mind? Trump pooped in it.
      • (Score: 2) by janrinok on Thursday December 07 2017, @05:57AM (1 child)

        by janrinok (52) Subscriber Badge on Thursday December 07 2017, @05:57AM (#606665) Journal
        Have you read this? [soylentnews.org]
        • (Score: 1, Insightful) by khallow on Thursday December 07 2017, @07:15AM

          by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday December 07 2017, @07:15AM (#606687) Journal
          The problem is that it's garbage. The author grinds away at his ideological ax throughout the paper (for example, using terms like "right/left winger" and "dog whistles" to name a couple that I saw with a quick glance). And no attempt has been made to distinguish subgroups. I also see all kinds of minor errors that just shouldn't make their way into the paper, like making an assertion [soylentnews.org] about automation and never revisiting the subject again, or calling a slight correlation "correlates highly".

          Not surprisingly, then, support for Trump correlates highly with a standard scale of modern racism (r = +.48; Van Assche & Pettigrew, 2016).

          The final straw though is the blatant slant to the interpretation of results. For example,

          Consider again the U.K. Brexit vote. Urban areas, such as London, with large, established immigrant populations voted strongly to remain in the European Union (EU); while areas with relatively few immigrants voted heavily to leave the EU. But when a longitudinal analysis is applied, the key variable emerges: the speed of change in the immigrant population. Areas with modest immigrant populations in 2000 that had witnessed more than a 200% rise in immigrants by 2015 voted an astounding 94% to leave the EU (Economist Staff, 2016). This striking result is an example of the delicate balance between threat and contact – the dual effects of diversity (Green, Sarrasin, Baur, & Fasel, 2016; Pettigrew & Hewstone, 2017; Wagner, Christ, Pettigrew, Stellmacher, & Wolf, 2006). London and other major English cities had had long experience with immigrants, and had increased their diversity relatively gradually. Time had reduced the sense of threat and enhanced positive intergroup contact. But for small towns and rural districts with a sudden and rapid entry of immigrants, perceived threat prevailed and optimal contact was as yet minimal.

          A quite similar process occurred in small Midwestern towns with rapid increases in Latino immigration. According to Adamy and Overberg (2016b), areas whose diversity index rose by 150% witnessed a 67% vote for Trump. Consider Arcadia, Wisconsin, that had job growth – not restricted jobs (Adamy & Overberg, 2016a). Arcadia’s plentiful jobs attracted rapid in-migration from below the Mexican border – roughly 1,500 miles away. The resulting perceived threat, unalleviated by a period of intergroup contact, made many rural and small-town White Midwesterners respond positively to Trump’s harsh anti-immigrant rhetoric. This interpretation is supported by the macro-findings of Rothwell and Diego-Rosell (2016) discussed above.

          In other words, areas with huge increases in immigrant population voted for Brexit and for Trump in their respective countries. He chooses to interpret that as meaning that the native population hasn't yet had experience dealing with recent immigrants rather than that their experience with recent immigrants is going poorly.

  • (Score: 3, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 07 2017, @01:56AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 07 2017, @01:56AM (#606542)

    Let's put the pseudoscience theater of vilifying others via psychological interpretation on firm scientific ground

    Pseudoscience - within context, any article in a peer-reviewed scientific journal running contrary to the narrative the mothership employing khallow wants.

    Until recently, the socio-economic and global warming were the topics which triggered a reaction from khallow. The pro-Trump stance seems to be the newer area the mothership looks interested.
    Hypothesis: recent tax reduction legislation made from Trump a character worth defending.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 07 2017, @06:26PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 07 2017, @06:26PM (#606919)

      Spot on mate.

      Khallow, the biggest shill around. Probably an alt of Jmorris who switched over once the Jmorris hate train picked up enough steam. Honestly K, you would get a lot more respect if you were a shill that came out rather than letting people think you're a monkey that learned how to read English. How many bananas did you get for this comment chain?