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How many hours' sleep do you average every 24 hours?

Displaying poll results.
Less than 5 hours
  3% 15 votes
5 <= hours < 6
  8% 35 votes
6 <= hours < 7
  20% 82 votes
7 <= hours < 8
  21% 85 votes
8 <= hours < 9
  9% 38 votes
9 <= hours < 10
  2% 8 votes
10 or more hours
  32% 130 votes
Sleep is for wimps!
  1% 4 votes
397 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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  • (Score: 3, Funny) by requerdanos on Wednesday April 12, @04:43PM (27 children)

    by requerdanos (5997) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday April 12, @04:43PM (#492874) Journal

    Interestingly, any number of hours from 0 to 24 is accommodated by this poll. Now we really really can't complain about lack of options.

    • (Score: 2) by martyb on Wednesday April 12, @05:56PM (14 children)

      by martyb (76) on Wednesday April 12, @05:56PM (#492942) Journal

      Interestingly, any number of hours from 0 to 24 is accommodated by this poll. Now we really really can't complain about lack of options.

      How long is it from: 2017-04-11 12:34:56 until 2017-04-12 12:34:56?

      How long is it from: 2017-11-04 12:34:56 until 2017-11-05 12:34:56?

      According to a wall clock in a region which observes Daylight Saving Time, one could conceivably obtain 25 hours of sleep in a "24-hour period". =)

      --
      Wit is intellect, dancing.
      • (Score: 3, Insightful) by maxwell demon on Wednesday April 12, @06:21PM (10 children)

        by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday April 12, @06:21PM (#492964) Journal

        According to a wall clock in a region which observes Daylight Saving Time, one could conceivably obtain 25 hours of sleep in a "24-hour period". =)

        That's still covered by the "more than 10 hours" option. Even if you decide to go around the world once per day and thus get a "24 hour period" that approaches infinity, it is still covered.

        --
        The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
        • (Score: 3, Interesting) by martyb on Wednesday April 12, @06:47PM (2 children)

          by martyb (76) on Wednesday April 12, @06:47PM (#492976) Journal

          According to a wall clock in a region which observes Daylight Saving Time, one could conceivably obtain 25 hours of sleep in a "24-hour period". =)

          That's still covered by the "more than 10 hours" option. Even if you decide to go around the world once per day and thus get a "24 hour period" that approaches infinity, it is still covered.

          Brilliant! I was debating whether or not to submit that comment... so nice to see someone take the idea and run with it! I'd never thought about that edge case -- you wouldn't happen to work in QA?

          --
          Wit is intellect, dancing.
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 16, @03:48AM (1 child)

            by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 16, @03:48AM (#494659)

            You could actually sleep on the south pole or north pole. Time zones are pretty well toast at that point.

            What if you do that and you roll in your sleep? If you roll in your sleep and nobody sees you, did you change time zones?

            Also, what frame of reference? How fast, and what is the gravitational field? Different parts of your body will be in slightly different frames of reference. When viewed from one frame of reference, perhaps your left side gets 8 hours of sleep but your right side gets slightly less.

        • (Score: 2) by Scruffy Beard 2 on Wednesday April 12, @07:18PM (6 children)

          by Scruffy Beard 2 (6030) on Wednesday April 12, @07:18PM (#492990)

          The poll question was about averages. Edges cases don't really apply: unless they are repeated.

          • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Wednesday April 12, @07:40PM (2 children)

            by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday April 12, @07:40PM (#493002) Journal

            An average of one value is still an average. And a say whose length approaches infinity may well be the only day in your life. Well, strictly speaking, the same can be true for a standard day, but then you are unlikely to be able to participate on this poll.

            --
            The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
            • (Score: 3, Informative) by DannyB on Thursday April 13, @02:30PM (1 child)

              by DannyB (5839) on Thursday April 13, @02:30PM (#493392)

              In many fields it is important to have two data points. Once that second data point is acquired you:
              1. draw a straight line through those two data points
              2. jump up and down
              3. yell "we now understand this phenomena completely!"
              4. write a paper

              • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 16, @08:23PM

                by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 16, @08:23PM (#494925)

                That's not how I heard it. At one aircraft company, pre WWII, there were two analysts that made data plots in the flight test department. Some data was extremely hard to get, so that plotter's job was to put a family of curves through one data point (hopefully based on some theory). Other data was readily available but extremely noisy, that plotter had the job of putting a best-fit single line through all the noise.

          • (Score: 1) by DECbot on Friday April 14, @05:24AM (2 children)

            by DECbot (832) on Friday April 14, @05:24AM (#493837) Journal

            So, if you were to describe your sleep pattern while stationed on the ISS... 12 days straight sleeping followed by 24 days awake (assuming a 40 minutes period for its orbit). Sure, you can say 8 hours, but using days sounds much more impressive.

            --
            cats~$ sudo chown -R us /home/base
            • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Friday April 14, @06:27AM

              by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Friday April 14, @06:27AM (#493849) Journal

              I'm not sure … sleeping 12 days per 36 days means sleeping 1/3 day per day. Same as 8 hours per 24h day.

              In another way it however does sound impressive: Sleeping 8*40 minutes per 36 days gives on average just 8 minutes and 32 seconds of sleep per day.

              --
              The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
            • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Sunday April 23, @06:05AM

              by bob_super (1357) on Sunday April 23, @06:05AM (#498185)

              ISS orbit is about 92 minutes.

              I love reading geeks commenting about the impossibility to find holes in the question...

      • (Score: 2) by VLM on Wednesday April 12, @07:19PM

        by VLM (445) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday April 12, @07:19PM (#492993)

        The word "Average" will handle that issue. Average over last two day or last 50 years or ... that's where it gets interesting.

      • (Score: 3, Informative) by DannyB on Thursday April 13, @02:27PM (1 child)

        by DannyB (5839) on Thursday April 13, @02:27PM (#493389)

        If you fly London to NY on a Concorde you can land with the local time being before your departure time. Because you fly faster than the earth's rotation. If you were to do this at the right time of day, you could see two sunrises in the same day.

        • (Score: 2) by Unixnut on Thursday April 13, @05:51PM

          by Unixnut (5779) on Thursday April 13, @05:51PM (#493512)

          Ha! I knew there was a conspiracy hiding the truth about Concorde being shut down! Mankind's first affordable time machine, allowing for two sunrises the same day cannot be allowed for the masses!

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 13, @02:01AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 13, @02:01AM (#493209)

      Logically, yes. Syntactically, the range includes any number from -∞ to +∞, or even a transfinite number.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Stardaemon on Thursday April 13, @06:17AM (2 children)

      by Stardaemon (4294) on Thursday April 13, @06:17AM (#493274)

      Exactly 10 seems to be missing.

    • (Score: 3, Touché) by jdavidb on Thursday April 13, @12:39PM (2 children)

      by jdavidb (5690) Subscriber Badge on Thursday April 13, @12:39PM (#493338) Homepage Journal
      I live on Mars, you insensitive clod!
      --
      ⓋⒶ☮✝🕊 Secession is the right of all sentient beings
      • (Score: 3, Touché) by requerdanos on Thursday April 13, @05:19PM (1 child)

        by requerdanos (5997) Subscriber Badge on Thursday April 13, @05:19PM (#493501) Journal

        I live on Mars

        The Martian day is about 242/3 hours. Would the above choices not be appropriate for your sleep? If not, why not?

        • (Score: 1) by DECbot on Friday April 14, @05:28AM

          by DECbot (832) on Friday April 14, @05:28AM (#493838) Journal

          Well, I live on... Uh... Above the clouds on Venus in geosynchronous orbit, you insensitive clod!

          --
          cats~$ sudo chown -R us /home/base
    • (Score: 2) by Anne Nonymous on Thursday April 13, @05:39PM (1 child)

      by Anne Nonymous (712) on Thursday April 13, @05:39PM (#493510)

      > really really can't complain about lack of options.

      You underestimate our power.

    • (Score: 2) by KritonK on Sunday April 16, @05:28PM

      by KritonK (465) on Sunday April 16, @05:28PM (#494872)

      Those of us who live on Mars would tend to disagree!

    • (Score: 2, Funny) by Tedderouni on Monday April 17, @07:37PM

      by Tedderouni (1533) on Monday April 17, @07:37PM (#495443)
    • (Score: 1) by fyngyrz on Sunday April 23, @12:52AM

      by fyngyrz (6567) Subscriber Badge on Sunday April 23, @12:52AM (#498117) Journal

      Interestingly, any number of hours from 0 to 24 is accommodated by this poll. Now we really really can't complain about lack of options.

      I'm voting from Mars, you intensive clod!

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 13, @01:24PM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 13, @01:24PM (#493349)

    This resource is no longer valid. Please return to the beginning and try again.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 22, @06:01PM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 22, @06:01PM (#498000)

      Use the Voting Booth link.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 29, @11:14AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 29, @11:14AM (#501512)

        Use the Voting Booth link.

        Thank you, this indeed seems to work. However my main concern is not getting my individual selection registered but instead filing a bug report.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 13, @04:28PM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 13, @04:28PM (#493477)

    It should have age descriptors also, we all know as you get older you get the less zzzzs.

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by mrpg on Friday April 14, @07:34PM

    by mrpg (5708) <mrpgNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday April 14, @07:34PM (#494158)
    Today's fortune cookie:

    To whom the mornings are like nights, What must the midnights be! -- Emily Dickinson (on hacking?)

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by mrpg on Friday April 14, @07:36PM (1 child)

    by mrpg (5708) <mrpgNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday April 14, @07:36PM (#494159)

    Another question would be "are you happy with how much you sleep?"

    • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 14, @07:51PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 14, @07:51PM (#494166)

      Agreed. I get 6-7h on average but a good night's sleep requires 9-10h.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 17, @05:07AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 17, @05:07AM (#495120)

    Unfortunately I suffer from real bad sleep voting.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 17, @09:47AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 17, @09:47AM (#495190)

    Had to answer this as I've been somewhat ill of late, In full health the average would be between 3 and 4 hours per 24 hours, as it has been for the last 30 years or so.

    I'm glad they say average, as when insomnia hits me, as it does occasionally, I can be awake for days, usually 2-3 days at a stretch but the longest bout so far was nine days...that skews things a bit.

     

  • (Score: 3, Informative) by ilsa on Wednesday April 19, @05:24PM

    by ilsa (6082) on Wednesday April 19, @05:24PM (#496430)

    There's option missing, which I though would probably get almost 100% of the vote:

    -Not enough

  • (Score: 1, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 20, @10:53AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 20, @10:53AM (#496791)

    does my sleeping for me, come on people

  • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Thursday April 20, @05:07PM

    by tangomargarine (667) on Thursday April 20, @05:07PM (#496938)

    When I was in college I got by on 5 hours of sleep for months at a time (every several weeks or so I'd wake up at like 3pm one day after having slept through my alarm). While doing this, I almost never woke up remembering having dreamed. After going back above 6 hours for a few days the dreams would come back.

    --
    "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 21, @10:11AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 21, @10:11AM (#497325)

    http://www.popsci.com/how-many-hours-sleep-do-you-actually-need [popsci.com]

    The rest of the groups weren't so far behind. While the group that received eight hours of sleep saw virtually no change to their cognitive performance throughout the two-week study, after just 10 days the participants that slept six hours each night were as cognitively impaired as those suffering from a night of total sleep deprivation. And the group that got four hours? It only took them three days before they reached that same level of impairment. By 10 days in, they were as cognitively impaired as if they had gone two days with no sleep. As the days went by, these detriments didn't slow down. “If you looked at the data graphs, there’s no end in sight. That was the frightening thing,” says Walker.

    By the way I strongly suspect that being woken up suddenly (by alarm clocks or other) is bad for health.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 21, @10:55AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 21, @10:55AM (#497342)

      Consider this: after the first night of reduced sleep, researchers in Dinges’ study asked the participants in the six-hour-a-night group how well they thought they did on the day’s cognitive tests. They replied that they did well—great, even. However, when the study researchers actually compared the two performances, the tests completed after six hours of sleep were significantly worse than the ones done after eight hours of sleep.

      “You don’t know you are sleep deprived when you are sleep deprived,” says Walker, “That’s why so many people fool themselves into thinking they are one of those people who can get away with six hours of sleep or less.” Walker argues that there’s no way you can effectively train yourself to need less sleep. You may get used to feeling tired all the time, he says, but that does not mean you can suppress that tiredness and perform as well on cognitive tests as you would if you received eight hours.

    • (Score: 2) by fliptop on Friday April 21, @03:54PM

      by fliptop (1666) on Friday April 21, @03:54PM (#497461) Journal

      By the way I strongly suspect that being woken up suddenly (by alarm clocks or other) is bad for health.

      This time of year the birds are my alarm clock. Sometimes I'll lay there, dozing and listening for a little while. Interesting dreams are often the result. And even though it's still early when I do get up, it feels like I've "slept in."

      I don't use an alarm clock at all. Four years of newspaper delivery while in college cured me of that.

      --
      It's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide.
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