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Best programming font?

Displaying poll results.
Courier New
  18% 39 votes
Chicago
  1% 4 votes
Segoe UI
  1% 4 votes
San Francisco
  1% 3 votes
Comic Sans MS
  33% 70 votes
Helvetica
  6% 13 votes
Other
  35% 73 votes
206 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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(1)
  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by The Mighty Buzzard on Friday March 02, @02:26PM (11 children)

    All goofing aside, I have to go with either Noto Mono or Unifont. I use the same (g)vim setup for coding that I do for everything else and I dislike ever having to see the unknown character symbol.

    --
    Cobra Kai
    • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Saturday March 03, @01:30AM (6 children)

      by Ethanol-fueled (2792) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 03, @01:30AM (#646755) Homepage

      Nice. I've worked in plenty of places where the embedded Linux guys and gals also preferred gVim.

      Here, aesthetically, it's Courier New only because of typewriter cred and the accompanying Hunter S. Thompson fetish, but practically the font takes up too much damn space. It's bad enough for assembler and a million times worse for needlessly verbose shit like Java. When writing code tutorials for others, like in powerpoints, with code blocks interleaved with commentary, I still use Courier New as the "code font" though.

      Practically it's whatever the default is on whatever it is I'm fucking with. Their default choices are readable, monospaced, and good enough. Age did to my body what it also did to my font preferences -- I stopped giving a fuck and started getting straight to the point.

      By the way, is "San Francisco" font some kind of inside Mac joke? Can somebody explain?

      • (Score: 5, Informative) by The Mighty Buzzard on Saturday March 03, @04:02AM (3 children)

        No idea. This bit of shitposting is entirely chromas's baby.

        --
        Cobra Kai
        • (Score: 3, Informative) by Sulla on Monday March 05, @02:31AM (2 children)

          by Sulla (5173) on Monday March 05, @02:31AM (#647819) Journal

          I realize that of everyone on this site its probably not my place to correct spelling or grammar, but shouldn't it just be Chromas'

          --
          "This fig came from a mere three days away by ship" - Cato the Elder
          • (Score: 3, Disagree) by The Mighty Buzzard on Monday March 05, @02:46AM

            Only if he's plural.

            --
            Cobra Kai
          • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Thursday March 22, @02:52PM

            by tangomargarine (667) on Thursday March 22, @02:52PM (#656615)

            Per APA Style, the answer is that the possessive of a singular name is formed by adding an apostrophe and an s, even when the name ends in s (see p. 96 in the sixth edition of the Publication Manual). Therefore, in the example above, the correct usage would be “Adams’s (2013) work.” Although this presentation may look awkward to some writers, the rule for forming the possessive does not change just because the name ends in s.

            However, it is important to note the following exception to this rule: You should use an apostrophe only with the singular form of names ending in unpronounced s (see p. 97 in the Publication Manual). Therefore, if you were writing a paper about the philosopher Descartes, to form the possessive with his name, you would need to just add an apostrophe (e.g., Descartes’ theory).

            http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2013/06/forming-possessives-with-singular-names.html [apastyle.org]

            --
            "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
      • (Score: 4, Informative) by HiThere on Tuesday March 13, @05:42PM (1 child)

        by HiThere (866) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13, @05:42PM (#651895)

        San Francisco was a font on the early MacIntoshes (I doubt they kept it) that has been described as "Most useful for writing ransom notes". Effectively each letter was in a different font, and many came with cut-out outlines or were at odd angles.

        I don't think the original was ever converted to TrueType. OTOH, a quick search yielded (this link is to download the font):
        https://developer.apple.com/fonts/downloads/SFPro.zip [apple.com]
        which seems to be a totally separate font with the same name. The site documentation said that it was one of their system fonts (or, perhaps, the system font), so perhaps the choice was meant seriously. I'd have linked to the font documentation, but the link I found didn't specify which font it was for.

        So it may have been a joke by someone who was used to the early MacIntosh, or it may have been serious by someone who used a modern one.

        --
        Put not your faith in princes.
    • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 03, @06:12PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 03, @06:12PM (#647160)

      I noticed that Noto is a Google-made font. Somehow they've managed to put surveillance for marketing purposes into a font. Yikes!

    • (Score: 4, Informative) by TheRaven on Sunday March 04, @02:22PM (2 children)

      by TheRaven (270) on Sunday March 04, @02:22PM (#647619) Journal
      It's a shame Source Code Pro wasn't on the list. It's a font that Adobe released for free a few years ago, specifically for rendering fixed-width text and specifically programming languages in a clear way. I'm surprised anyone would use anything else these days.
      --
      sudo mod me up
      • (Score: 2) by ilsa on Wednesday March 14, @04:16PM

        by ilsa (6082) on Wednesday March 14, @04:16PM (#652463)

        Seconded. SourceCodePro is a really good font for terminals too.

      • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Friday March 23, @04:20AM

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Friday March 23, @04:20AM (#657017)

        Another vote for Source Code Pro - it's what I've been using in Qt Creator, though I didn't know the name until I just looked it up.

        Clear, easy to read, works for me.

  • (Score: 4, Funny) by looorg on Friday March 02, @02:30PM (12 children)

    by looorg (578) on Friday March 02, @02:30PM (#646371)

    Seriously that has got to be the troll option. Programming with Comic Sans Serif? Horrible horrible people.

    I don't really think I have a preference for an exact font, but there are options or preferences that should be included: The font should have serifs (little feet), they don't have to be large or on all the characters. I would prefer it to not have anti-aliasing. It should be fixed width. It should abso-fucking-lutely not have or force the use of ligatures (the fancyassname for that shit that pulls characters together to form symbols and replaces my --> with little arrow symbols), that shit just has to go and die in a fire!

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by FakeBeldin on Friday March 02, @03:41PM

      by FakeBeldin (3360) on Friday March 02, @03:41PM (#646426) Journal

      I would say:
      - fixed width
      - 1 character per width, no ligatures
      - easy distinction between commonly confused characters (l/I/1/|, o/0/O, ...)

      Other than that: "legible" - whatever that means.
      Serifs: don't care too much I think, maybe slight preference for not.
      Anti-aliasing: if I can notice it (or the lack of it), then it's bad. But no clue if I have a preference.

    • (Score: 3, Funny) by Hartree on Friday March 02, @06:56PM

      by Hartree (195) on Friday March 02, @06:56PM (#646540)

      "Horrible horrible people."

      Of course I'm a horrible person. I even play Cards Against Humanity.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @09:25PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @09:25PM (#646645)

      There's actually an edited version of comic sans floating around that is monospaced.

    • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Saturday March 03, @01:32AM (3 children)

      by Ethanol-fueled (2792) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 03, @01:32AM (#646757) Homepage

      Wait, San Francisco is not the troll option?

      Your face when you've seen Comic Sans actually used in corporate documents...

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @09:10PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @09:10PM (#648177)

      The font should have serifs (little feet)

      A Lowell George fan, I see. But it's spelled "feAt".

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by cocaine overdose on Tuesday March 06, @07:04PM

      I use Comic Sans because it's easier on the eyes, easier to scale down without horrible horrible anti-aliasing, and having variable-width fonts helps me locate a unique part I need, when searching with tools would take more time. I don't even like fixed-width fonts. You're wasting space, a lot of space.

      I'll take 4pt comic sans on a 16:10 1980x1020, thank you very much. Well it's not real comic sans, I reprojected some things like spaces and tabs, because those too took up too much space. Do you know what it's like to have 30 floating windows open, and still be productive? I do. But it comes at a severe cost. I can't use package managers for anything non-curses. Modern open-source UI designers would like me to see me claw out my eyes and stroke out from claustrophobia. Firefox's smallest font? 9px. For what reason, Mozilla? For what good reason do you limit me by getting in my way! I've had to build from source my own Firefox-ESR, with font patches, menu patches (resize it all, remove those god awful separators, PUT THE BOOKMARKS BACK IN THE MAIN OPTION MENU, remove the second search bar, remove padding of text, replace buttons with UTF-8 symbols, everything must be smaller!!). Now multiply this for every graphical software you need. The price I pay for productivity.

      Even now, after installing Linux again on another machine, I'm just hit with this huge wave of dread "why is the tty so goddamn big?" Designers have cursed us with bloat, but non-designers have cursed us with claustrophobia!

    • (Score: 2) by bradley13 on Sunday March 11, @07:50AM

      by bradley13 (3053) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 11, @07:50AM (#650827) Homepage Journal

      Of course Comic Sans is the troll option. I picked it, because it never occurred to me to have a favorite programming font. But I'm interested to see what other people have picked. If some of them are really better than whatever the default is (no idea what that might be), then - hey - never too old to learn.

      Hey, kid, get off may lawn.

      --
      Everyone is somebody else's weirdo.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13, @03:20PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13, @03:20PM (#651839)

      Of course the complete poll is a joke. Everyone knows that programs should use all the fonts side by side:

      • Courier New for string literals.
      • Chicago for macro names.
      • Segoe UI for integer literals.
      • San Francisco for keywords.
      • Comic Sans MS for comments.
      • Helvetica for variable names.
      • Other fonts for other elements of the grammar.

      SCNR :-)

    • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Sunday March 25, @11:47AM

      by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 25, @11:47AM (#657866) Journal

      Comic sans is the best font for bad programmers. People will be so upset about the choice of font that they'll not notice that it is the least problem with the code. ;-)

      --
      The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
  • (Score: 0, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @02:59PM (4 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @02:59PM (#646391)

    I've been programming on so many platforms in so many languages with so many different text editors, I don't give a shit what the font looks like as long as it's anything monospaced.

    Coding is a fool's hobby anyway because after years and years and fucking years of coding, I have never ever ever gotten paid for it.

    Here in the real world, codng jobs do not exist. Anyone who claims to have a coding job is a fucking liar spreading false rumors.

    So fuck you up the ass with a space cadet keyboard, you motherfucking shitbags.

    • (Score: 0, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @03:27PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @03:27PM (#646414)

      Stupid kids care about fonts when they pick up a copy of Coder Bro's Best Font ("too small for the olds to read!") and Coder Bro's Elite IDE ("with built-in video streaming so your bros can watch you code live!").

      Stupid kids only know one language and only use one coding rig because they learned to code yesterday ("Crushing It, Bro!!!!!!!!").

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by VLM on Friday March 02, @08:45PM (1 child)

      by VLM (445) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 02, @08:45PM (#646618)

      Aside from all that, the only serious font on the list that isn't a Microsoft or Apple Inc endorsed font is Helvetica.

      In the old days we enjoyed whatever the linux console font was. Or MSDOS console font wasn't bad.

      One font I didn't like was small number of dots dot matrix printers where lowercase descenders were lifted up to fit. Now that looked awful.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @10:36PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @10:36PM (#646668)

        My first computer was an Apple IIe that my dad stole from work right before he got fired and we skipped town. Our family didn't have a TV while we were on the run, so I used an ImageWriter dot matrix printer as a teletype instead. I had fun with our Apple IIe until my dad sold it to pay for crack cocaine.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 21, @08:27PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 21, @08:27PM (#656323)

      tell us how you really feel

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @03:56PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @03:56PM (#646437)

    This is the 6x13 font in a genuine xterm.

    It's exactly wide enough, no more and no less. (size includes the spacing) This gives the maximum amount of text while still being readable.

    I suppose 6x12 would be better for me as an American. I don't stack accents.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @04:21PM (12 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @04:21PM (#646452)

    I had a tendency of switching back and forth between fonts constantly until I found that one.

    • (Score: 0, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @10:43PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @10:43PM (#646673)

      You gotta be shitting me. "Coder Bro's Best Font" is a real thing and it's really called Anonymous Pro.

      You fucking techbro posers are sick in the head.

      • (Score: 2, Funny) by Ethanol-fueled on Saturday March 03, @01:39AM

        by Ethanol-fueled (2792) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 03, @01:39AM (#646760) Homepage

        Being objective here, it appears that "Anonymous Pro" font is the adopted son of Courier New and San Francisco. It lacks consistency and appears to be the agendered flotsam of two gay male parents who are already fighting over the kid even though they are not yet divorced.

        Your ad to sell your font failed because your font sucks.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by TheRaven on Sunday March 04, @02:26PM (9 children)

      by TheRaven (270) on Sunday March 04, @02:26PM (#647621) Journal
      Wow. The font's official web site [marksimonson.com] shows you how bad it is. Even in their trivial demo, the m and a in main are closer together than the a and i, and there are several other places where you can see that the kerning is terrible.
      --
      sudo mod me up
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @10:35PM (8 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @10:35PM (#648227)
        Who cares about kerning in what should be a monospaced programming font?
        • (Score: 2) by TheRaven on Wednesday March 07, @09:57AM (7 children)

          by TheRaven (270) on Wednesday March 07, @09:57AM (#648934) Journal
          The purpose of a good font is to improve readability. The less of your brain power you are using to translate glyphs into tokens, the more you can use to understand the code. Poor kerning means uneven amounts of whitespace between adjacent characters, which means less information for your visual cortex to use to spot word breaks. Numerous studies have shown that this decreases either reading speed, reading comprehension, or both. If you don't think that quickly understanding the code is important, then I hope I never use any code that you've written.
          --
          sudo mod me up
          • (Score: 2) by Arik on Monday March 12, @03:19PM (6 children)

            by Arik (4543) on Monday March 12, @03:19PM (#651358)
            "The purpose of a good font is to improve readability."

            s/improve/provide. You can't improve what does not exist.

            "The less of your brain power you are using to translate glyphs into tokens, the more you can use to understand the code."

            Yes, that's essentially correct. The best fonts are simple, regular, uniform, yet distinct, providing the brain an easy path to perceiving the information contained in the underlying text.

            "Poor kerning means uneven amounts of whitespace between adjacent characters, which means less information for your visual cortex to use to spot word breaks."

            While that's true, it really only applies to variable-width fonts. In context of a monospace screen-font kerning is not needed or usable for that purpose. The brain doesn't need to rely on whitespace to determine spacing when that spacing is regular and predictable to begin with! The variable amounts of whitespace, in that context, are a good thing, they let you maintain readability a little longer as you shrink the font smaller and smaller. Main, to use your example, resists becoming Mmn as it is shrunken precisely because of this.

            It may well offend your aesthetic sensibilities, and there's no point about arguing those. But your claim that it harms readability is false, and built on a false premise.

            --
            "If Evolution Is Outlawed, Only Outlaws Will Evolve."
            • (Score: 2) by TheRaven on Monday March 12, @04:46PM (5 children)

              by TheRaven (270) on Monday March 12, @04:46PM (#651413) Journal

              While that's true, it really only applies to variable-width fonts

              That is simply not true, and I'd advise you to go back and read some of the papers from the '60s and '70s when this was being actively researched. You're making a lot of claims after this, but they're not backed up by any of the experiments that have been conducted in this area.

              Oh, there's also a small body of evidence that indicates that proportional fonts are better for readability even for programming, as long as you have a typesetter that ensures whitespace is correctly aligned.

              --
              sudo mod me up
              • (Score: 2) by Arik on Monday March 12, @10:19PM (4 children)

                by Arik (4543) on Monday March 12, @10:19PM (#651551)
                I notice you don't bother to cite any of these studies. I've read quite a few, I suspect you realize I'll shred any citations you can come up with here, about as easily as you could shred any report that claimed to prove the sky is red, so you just wave your hand and pretend the motion of air had meaning.

                They're either measuring a different sky, or they have defined a different 'red,' or they simply failed at data collection; whatever. The sky is not red, on earth, within normal parameters, for long periods of time. And variable width glyphs are not easier to read than fixed-width glyphs on a video monitor under normal circumstances either, the exact opposite is the case. With variable width the brain has to actually process subtle and not necessarily consistent hints to separate the glyphs into appropriate units before it can begin deciphering them; while with fixed-width glyphs the beginning and end of each and every glyph is always immediately apparent and perfectly predictable.

                But go on, believe some misinterpretation of a throw away line in a second-rate usability study you half remember (or don't dare cite because you know it's rubbish) instead of using your brain and thinking it through, or testing it yourself.
                --
                "If Evolution Is Outlawed, Only Outlaws Will Evolve."
                • (Score: 2) by TheRaven on Tuesday March 13, @08:30AM (3 children)

                  by TheRaven (270) on Tuesday March 13, @08:30AM (#651734) Journal
                  Wow. I'm not digging out the citations, because I spent several months reading them when I was working on a typesetting project a decade ago and I'm lazy, but there are so many things wrong in your post that I can't even begin to think where to start. I'd suggest that you start with Knuth's work and follow his PhD students' work and the studies that they cite. You've obviously made up your mind, so please keep enjoying your fixed-width font and wondering why people misunderstand what you've written more often than they do anyone else.
                  --
                  sudo mod me up
                  • (Score: 2) by Arik on Tuesday March 13, @05:43PM

                    by Arik (4543) on Tuesday March 13, @05:43PM (#651896)
                    There is no one so blind as he who refuses to open up his eyes to see.

                    Keep denying the evidence of your senses and relying on your misunderstanding of Knuths work. You'll get along well in the industry today.
                    --
                    "If Evolution Is Outlawed, Only Outlaws Will Evolve."
                  • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Tuesday March 13, @05:55PM

                    by HiThere (866) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13, @05:55PM (#651901)

                    This is one of the things that causes me to prefer tabs over spaces for leading indents. With tabs you set how much space each indent involves, and it's easy to line things up properly. With non-monospaced fonts, spaces are apt to not work at all, and if they do work, the amount of spacing is uncontrollably variable.

                    If you can guarantee that the text will always be displayed in your chosen font, then it's only a matter of the bother of hitting the space bar so often, and it's designed and positioned for that, but if the fonts can't be chosen, then that just doesn't work. Some people have some sort of religious commitment to spaces rather than tabs, but fortunately there's a utility that can be used to process the files before you hand them off.

                    --
                    Put not your faith in princes.
                  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 21, @08:23PM

                    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 21, @08:23PM (#656318)

                             You didn't provide any citations
                          Yeah well neither did you
                       no u
                    NO U

                    Can we stop this train? I want to get off.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @06:00PM (6 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @06:00PM (#646504)

    Anonymous Pro
    Anonymous Pro Minus
    Fantasque Mono

    • (Score: 5, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 03, @01:51AM (3 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 03, @01:51AM (#646763)
      Arik Mono
      • (Score: 3, Touché) by Arik on Monday March 12, @02:55PM (2 children)

        by Arik (4543) on Monday March 12, @02:55PM (#651349)
        "Arik Mono"

        Obviously not a real thing, as it would be completely redundant.

        As is the phrase 'monospace font.' That's just a font. The other kind of font is a 'defective font.'
        --
        "If Evolution Is Outlawed, Only Outlaws Will Evolve."
        • (Score: 2) by Sarasani on Wednesday March 21, @05:01AM

          by Sarasani (3283) on Wednesday March 21, @05:01AM (#655915)

          Obviously not a real thing

          It is a real thing for you, Arik. I've always wondered why you feel the need to always post in monospace font as the only person to do so on SoylentNews. Do you feel that insecure that people might not appreciate your comments without it?

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 21, @02:57PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 21, @02:57PM (#656117)

          For anyone else who is sick and tired of idiots who feel the need to post everything in TT tags resulting in monospaced fonts, just add a style to the "Stylus" Firefox addon for SoylentNews.org:

          tt {
                          font-family: Verdana, Geneva, "Bitstream Vera Sans", "DejaVu Sans", sans-serif !important;
          }

          It will make the TT tags look like all the other text.

    • (Score: 2) by cubancigar11 on Saturday March 03, @04:48AM

      by cubancigar11 (330) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 03, @04:48AM (#646841) Homepage Journal

      +1 Anonymous Pro - I used it for the longest time until I found Cousine (https://fonts.google.com/specimen/Cousine). This is my default font now (usurping fira-sans, hack, source code pro, noto etc.) on aliased display, otherwise anonymous pro.

      Didn't know about Anonymous Pro Minus, will check it out.

    • (Score: 2) by stretch611 on Saturday March 03, @09:55PM

      by stretch611 (6199) on Saturday March 03, @09:55PM (#647285)

      Actually, Anonymous Pro is great. It is what I use. (Anonymous Pro Minus is the same minus embedded bitmaps for smaller font sizes.)

      Both are licensed under the Open Font License [wikipedia.org] and is free.

      It is a fixed width font and care is taken to distinguish between 1/I, 0/O and other similar characters.

      https://www.marksimonson.com/fonts/view/anonymous-pro [marksimonson.com]

      PDF of text sample including foreign chars: https://www.marksimonson.com/assets/content/fonts/AnonymousProSpecimen.pdf [marksimonson.com]

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @11:11PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, @11:11PM (#646687)

    The only correct answer is Programmer's Font.

    https://archive.org/details/tucows_207113_Programmer_s_Font [archive.org]

    Dated 2000-01-02 and available for download in genuine Macintosh BinHex HQX format.

  • (Score: 2) by shortscreen on Saturday March 03, @02:19AM (1 child)

    by shortscreen (2252) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 03, @02:19AM (#646773) Journal

    8x16 is OK too.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 03, @02:21AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 03, @02:21AM (#646774)

      ter-v14n

  • (Score: 3, Funny) by jmorris on Saturday March 03, @03:24AM (9 children)

    by jmorris (4844) Subscriber Badge <reversethis-{gro.uaeb} {ta} {sirromj}> on Saturday March 03, @03:24AM (#646802)

    List obviously composed by code monkeys who have only banged out Wordpress extensions, Java or some other lame crap like that on their Mac.

    But real men code in Vim and use a nice readable monospaced font like Terminus. GVim is acceptable but makes others question your qualifications. Emacs if you are gay. Eclipse means you probably have warning hair and make "apps" to bilk idiots out of microtransactions. Visual Studio means you are a web developer or do Database frontends in VB and call yourself a programmer.

    Yes I'm inciting a riot.

    • (Score: 2) by cubancigar11 on Saturday March 03, @04:54AM (5 children)

      by cubancigar11 (330) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 03, @04:54AM (#646845) Homepage Journal

      Terminus is fine but what do you do if you want oblique/bold fonts?

      • (Score: 4, Funny) by jmorris on Saturday March 03, @05:12AM (4 children)

        by jmorris (4844) Subscriber Badge <reversethis-{gro.uaeb} {ta} {sirromj}> on Saturday March 03, @05:12AM (#646858)

        What sort of show tunes singing fairy needs that for programming? Colorized is handy though. Anyway, you can bold terminus in a terminal window but it looks like it is just doublestriking.

        • (Score: 2) by cubancigar11 on Saturday March 03, @07:25AM (2 children)

          by cubancigar11 (330) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 03, @07:25AM (#646917) Homepage Journal

          Not just for programming for setting it for rxvt/xterm.

          If terminus doublestrikes for bold, that's good enough. I still think anonymous-pro looks better :)

          • (Score: 2) by bzipitidoo on Sunday March 04, @02:00AM (1 child)

            by bzipitidoo (4388) on Sunday March 04, @02:00AM (#647412) Journal

            I totally agree Terminus is an awesome font. Use it myself. And yes, I use it in vim in an xterm all the time. Emacs takes a second or so longer to start, so I use vim.

            Italics and bold? Well, that's underline and doublestrike. And that's not near as important to me as the lack of a proportional font that looks good without hinting and antialiasing. Sure wish there was a proportional version of Terminus.

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 04, @08:12AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 04, @08:12AM (#647550)

              I personally use terminus, and I use the bold features extensively. started on 1024x768, and still using it now on a 3840x2160.

              but i think the pixel aspect is crucial for it to work. whenever i need a TTF, I prefer Deja Vu Sans Mono (or the various identical fonts). and yes, sometimes i like to see a lot of code so i switch to Deja Vu Sans Mono and zoom out like crazy. the effect on the big screen is really cool.

        • (Score: 2) by cubancigar11 on Tuesday March 06, @12:32PM

          by cubancigar11 (330) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 06, @12:32PM (#648469) Homepage Journal

          Damn, this is embarassing. I do use terminus and not anonymous pro. Something is wrong in my head, kindly forgive me.
          Excerpts from my .Xresources:

          URxvt.font: -*-terminus-medium-r-*-*-14-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
          URxvt.boldFont: -*-terminus-bold-r-*-*-14-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
          URxvt.italicFont: -*-terminus-medium-o-*-*-14-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
          URxvt.boldItalicFont: -*-terminus-bold-o-*-*-14-*-*-*-*-*-*-*

    • (Score: 2) by Tara Li on Tuesday March 06, @04:55PM

      by Tara Li (6248) on Tuesday March 06, @04:55PM (#648552)

      Don't look at me, I use IBM 3270.

    • (Score: 2) by LoRdTAW on Wednesday March 07, @04:11PM

      by LoRdTAW (3755) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday March 07, @04:11PM (#649039) Journal

      Visual Studio means you are a web developer or do Database frontends in VB and call yourself a programmer.

      Sigh. If only that were true... https://www.beckhoff.com/english/twincat/twincat-3-extended-automation-engineering.htm?id=1893323218933238 [beckhoff.com]

    • (Score: 2) by isostatic on Wednesday March 21, @09:33AM

      by isostatic (365) on Wednesday March 21, @09:33AM (#656003) Journal

      Yes I'm inciting a riot.

      How? You only said "like Terminus", which gives people options to chime in with their own favourite monospace font (open mind and all that). The rest of your post is just truisms. Seems very accommodating to me.

  • (Score: 2) by SomeGuy on Saturday March 03, @03:33AM

    by SomeGuy (5632) on Saturday March 03, @03:33AM (#646804)

    It wasn't perfect, but I used to use good old windows FIXEDSYS all the time. Decent as blue/red text on a black background. It is a screen font rather than truetype, though.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 03, @06:10AM (8 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 03, @06:10AM (#646888)

    its 2017, why isn't this automated by now?

    • (Score: 3, Touché) by chromas on Sunday March 04, @10:59AM

      by chromas (34) on Sunday March 04, @10:59AM (#647577)

      A few old curmudgeons still hang onto their text-based programming, yes. For some reason. Of course, it's nothing so powerful as deeplearn blockchain programming design web. Some people just won't get with the times. That's why where here instead of over a beta.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 06, @08:30AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 06, @08:30AM (#648419)

      That explains all the unmaintained spaghetti code we're seeing these days.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 07, @02:20PM (5 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 07, @02:20PM (#648988)

      Automated, outsourced to India, what's the difference? Either way there are zero jobs for programmers and absolutely no way to get paid for programming.

      Programming is a worthless hobby, nothing more.

      • (Score: 2) by turgid on Tuesday March 20, @09:02PM (1 child)

        by turgid (4318) on Tuesday March 20, @09:02PM (#655615) Journal

        Not quite. The general quality of programming these days is such that anyone who can get a unit test to pass is worth a lot of money. In the land of the blind the one-eyed man is king etc.

        --
        Don't let Righty keep you down. #freearistarchus!!!
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 26, @06:02AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 26, @06:02AM (#658246)

          I don't have time to write buggy code; I'm too busy fixing bugs in code written by idiots. The trouble with writing code right the first time is I don't produce a mile-long commit history like you fucking trash coders who claim rockstar status by shittng out mountains of defective garbage.

          In rockstar coder land, quantity means quality! Pro coder bros know if you write a really big number of lines of bad code, the good/bad register overflows and wraps around, and then the code magically becomes good code.

          Do I ever get paid to fix your shit? Of course not.

          Fuck you.

      • (Score: 2) by bootsy on Wednesday March 21, @04:39PM (2 children)

        by bootsy (3440) on Wednesday March 21, @04:39PM (#656179)

        Depends on what language you use and what you specialise in. Good programmers are still hard to find.

        The current rate for a good Q programmer, www.kx.com, in London is around 1000 pound a day.

        If you are female and are a programmer you are virtually guaranteed a job.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 26, @05:42AM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 26, @05:42AM (#658243)

          Total bullshit. I've been programming for thirty years in esoteric languages you've never heard of, and I haven't seen one dime for my work.

          You're lying and you know it. What is truly infuriating is how lying little shits like you keep spreading the completely false rumor that programming is extremely lucrative. Nothing could be further from the truth. Outside of the make-believe fantasyland you fucking liars have fabricated, programming pays exactly nothing.

          Stop misleading everyone, you deceitful turd.

          • (Score: 2) by bootsy on Monday March 26, @01:24PM

            by bootsy (3440) on Monday March 26, @01:24PM (#658409)

            As a cost centre manager I am paying out these rates I describe. I don't know where you are based geographical and what skill sets you have but you can still get very good pay indeed as a programmer especially if you specialise. I have no need to lie about these things on a site like soylent news. I will grant you there are some strange patterns in programming rates e.g. after 15 years of Java programming experience the rate goes flat. Also younger programmers are often more expensive than older ones as if you have been around a bit you probably have fixed housing costs from a mortgage when house prices were lower versus younger developers who will be attempting to rent at today's crazy prices.

  • (Score: 2, Funny) by realDonaldTrump on Saturday March 03, @06:16AM

    by realDonaldTrump (6614) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 03, @06:16AM (#646892) Homepage Journal

    All our scripts, and everybody's scripts, are "Courier." It looks just like the electric typewriter, very easy to read. You're writing for me, and you write in the Book font? You better try your luck writing a book, because you're FIRED! And nobody will want your scripts. It's nothing personal, it's just business. Actually, try @Schwarzenegger [twitter.com]. The HASBEEN who took a very, very successful show and dragged the ratings down TREMENDOUSLY. He's not German, people don't know this, he's Austrian. But I hear he uses the German font. That even the Germans stopped using after the war.

    --
    Text TRUMP to 88022 to join the 🚂 #TrumpTrain [facebook.com]
  • (Score: 2) by martyb on Sunday March 04, @03:54PM (2 children)

    by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 04, @03:54PM (#647636) Journal

    For emacs, I use "Lucida Console". I have different scripts to start emacs in everything from tiny fonts on small window, tiny font on wide and tall, and larger font on wide and tall... depending on what I am looking at (code, log files, program output, etc.)

    For CMD windows, I prefer using "Raster Fonts" set to 8x12... but I also load ansicon [github.com] so I can set a color for the command prompt that is different from the color of commands I issue and the responses. Took some finagling to get it working, but would never go back to a monochrome cmd window again if I can help it.

    --
    Wit is intellect, dancing.
    • (Score: 2) by RamiK on Wednesday March 07, @04:01PM

      by RamiK (1813) on Wednesday March 07, @04:01PM (#649032)

      Consider Go: https://go.googlesource.com/image/+/master/font/gofont/ttfs/ [googlesource.com] https://blog.golang.org/go-fonts [golang.org]

      It's a Lucida variant that was tweaked to match the DIN legibility specs. In retrospect and considering the release timing, I suspect B&H made it after Lucida and Helvetica were dumped by Apple over the DIN specs. But when Apple still decided to opt for their in-house Helvetica DIN knockoff (aka San Francisco), they made it available to the Go folks that are fans of their work since the plan9 days.

      Well, my wild flights of fancy aside, if you like Lucida I think it should be right up your alley.

      --
      compiling...
    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Friday March 09, @03:18PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 09, @03:18PM (#650005)

      I've tried quite a few. But I settled on Lucidia Console when using Eclipse on Windows. I want more lines of text visible, which it has; but the glyphs also have a proper aspect ratio so I get a decent number of characters per line without making characters too narrow.

      But everyone has their preferences. And I know mine have changed over the decades. (Probably as my eyes get older and older. But I still don't need glasses to read the monitor.)

      I don't remember what I'm using for Eclipse on Linux at home.

  • (Score: 2) by JNCF on Monday March 05, @03:04AM

    by JNCF (4317) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 05, @03:04AM (#647837) Journal

    As somebody who uses stupidly small screens for things they were never meant to handle, I appreciate the Proggy family. [proggyfonts.net]

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @07:13AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @07:13AM (#647891)

    On a current Mac, I like Monaco.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 06, @06:10AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 06, @06:10AM (#648379)

      Monaco is one of the few fonts that still comes with bitmaps for tiny point sizes. Great for showing All The Things in a retina full screen terminal!

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Friday March 09, @03:19PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 09, @03:19PM (#650007)

      In the 80's and 90's when I was a Mac developer, I liked Monaco. I tried a few programming fonts, but always seemed to go back to Monaco. I think I ended up on a programming font that was based on Monaco.

      Ah, the days of MPW on classic mac.

  • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @07:43PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @07:43PM (#648115)

    Alphabetti Spaghetti!

    Perfect for every word soup - and I write PHP.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @09:02PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 05, @09:02PM (#648167)

    Not counting "Other," Comic Sans is a close second. It should be expected, though. Courier being the fixed width font (that I know of, anyway), and said smart asses.

    I admit I voted for Comic Sans.

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by stormwyrm on Monday March 05, @10:10PM (1 child)

    by stormwyrm (717) on Monday March 05, @10:10PM (#648212) Journal

    There was a discussion [soylentnews.org] here some years back about fonts and someone there mentioned Anonymous Pro Minus [marksimonson.com]. I tried several other recommendations given in the article but settled on Anonymous Pro as I found it clean and pleasant to look at with useful hints like slashed zeroes.

    --
    People don't like to think. If one thinks one must reach conclusions. Conclusions are not always pleasant.
    • (Score: 2) by DarkMorph on Saturday March 10, @07:53PM

      by DarkMorph (674) on Saturday March 10, @07:53PM (#650616)
      A fair libre alternative is Inconsolata. After flipping between the two a few times, I couldn't differentiate them apart from one another aside from their licencing. Perhaps they have glyphs that aren't seemingly identical, but I didn't spot them.
  • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Tuesday March 06, @07:21PM

    by Freeman (732) on Tuesday March 06, @07:21PM (#648621) Journal

    I've been using PyCharm for a year or two now and apparently the font is Monospaced. Seems to be working well for me.

    --
    "I said in my haste, All men are liars." Psalm 116:11
  • (Score: 2) by requerdanos on Wednesday March 07, @02:16AM

    by requerdanos (5997) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday March 07, @02:16AM (#648825) Journal

    According to my kate configuration, I seem to use Dejavu Sans Mono for programming. Kate is my code editor of choice because of its cool mini-document-as-scroll-bar that sets it apart (which is not just nifty, but is helpful in finding where I want to be in source files and script files).

    For years I searched for the perfect convergence of "Freely licensed" and "Proper Oh/Zero differentiation" and "Proper El/One differentiation" and "Monospaced" and "Easy on the Eyes", but finally gave up sometime within the past few years. Now I just look for "freely licensed/I can see it" which Dejavu Sans Mono seems very much to fulfill.

    I increase the font size as my vision worsens through the years. My monitors have also increased in size (my current workstation has three 40" 1080p TV sets mounted on the wall for its monitor array. No, they aren't too big. I can finally see everything.)

  • (Score: 2) by Lemming on Thursday March 08, @10:42AM (1 child)

    by Lemming (1053) on Thursday March 08, @10:42AM (#649423)

    Since this was released by MS, it's my favorite programming / console font. It's highly readable and provides clear distinctions between similar characters (e.g. O and 0, l, I and 1), and it uses ClearType subpixel rendering for a crisp display on LCD monitors.

    It's not free as in freedom, but it's included in all recent versions of Windows and can be downloaded [microsoft.com] freely from the MS site. I now see on Wikipedia there exists an open source alternative: Inconsolata [wikipedia.org].

    • (Score: 2) by Virindi on Sunday March 11, @10:30PM

      by Virindi (3484) on Sunday March 11, @10:30PM (#651094)

      Agreed. Even after I completely swore off Windows I still really like Consolas. A lot of things about Visual Studio are incredibly aggravating, but the font is not one of them :)

  • (Score: 2) by urza9814 on Thursday March 08, @04:57PM (2 children)

    by urza9814 (3954) on Thursday March 08, @04:57PM (#649549) Journal

    Depends what I'm coding.

    For my daily use terminal, where I'm just running a quick command or making a minor edit in vi, I like miama (https://www.urbanfonts.com/fonts/Miama.font) Yes, I use a script font for my terminal. Deal with it. :)

    For my heavier use terminal, which I use when I want to sit down for a couple hours and get some work done, I use Audiowide (https://www.1001freefonts.com/audiowide.font)

    When I want a non-CLI text editor I do sometimes use Brackets, but I think that one just has the font at whatever default it came with. Some monospace font that's easy to read at a very small size so I can fit more lines on one screen. Possibly Courier.

    The terminals are semi-transparent and I do need to be able to see through them (Conky lives behind them and they do not move), so there's no point keeping a font that's easy to read in a small size as the transparency would make it too hard to read at that size anyway. Miama is nice for that because it lacks straight lines likely to get lost in a line showing through from behind it; and Audiowide is nice because it's fairly thick and distinct.

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Friday March 09, @05:07PM (1 child)

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 09, @05:07PM (#650063)

      I need monospaced font with Unicode characters. Just, well, because!

      In this example is a Java function using a Unicode symbol as its function name. Be sure to use a font that includes these letters. But hey, Sigma is a letter, and therefore a valid Java identifier.

          /**
           * Sigma function.
           * @param fn a Java 8 Function that takes an integer an returns an integer.
           * @param first
           * @param last
           * @return Sum of calling fn over range from first to last, incremented by one.
           */
          public int Σ( java.util.function.Function<Integer,Integer> fn, int first, int last ) {
              return Σ( fn, first, last, 1 );
          }
          /**
           * Sigma function.
           * @param fn a Java 8 Function that takes an integer an returns an integer.
           * @param first
           * @param last
           * @param step
           * @return Sum of calling fn over range from first to last, incremented by step.
           */
          public int Σ( java.util.function.Function<Integer,Integer> fn, int first, int last, int step ) {
              int sum = 0;
              if( step > 0 ) {
                  for( int i = first;  i <= last;  i += step ) {
                      sum += fn.apply( i );
                  }
              }
              else if( step < 0 ) {
                  for( int i = first;  i >= last;  i -= step ) {
                      sum += fn.apply( i );
                  }
              }
              else {
                  throw new IllegalArgumentException( "step cannot be zero." );
              }
              return sum;
          }

      For more fun, use a program that replaces all of your Java identifiers with alternate identifiers made up of letters from other languages. For example, in a single identifier, use a character from each of, say, Hebrew, Katakana and Arabic. But I must sadfully report that the Java keywords remain recognizable. (But see below)

      In a language like Clojure (a Lisp that runs on the JVM infrastructure) you can really go crazy(ier) with identifiers. So definitely use a suitable font. :-) Here are some quick Clojure examples:

      ; a macro to use the lambda character as God intended.
      (defmacro λ [& rest] `(fn ~@rest))

      ; Define globals Pi, Tau and e.
      (def π (. Math PI))
      (def τ (* 2.0 π))
      (def ℯ (. Math E))

      ; Macros for Not Equal, Less-Equal or Greater-Equal.
      (defmacro ≠ [& rest] `(not (= ~@rest)))
      (defmacro ≤ [& rest] `(<= ~@rest))
      (defmacro ≥ [& rest] `(>= ~@rest))

      Now slightly off topic, in Java, you can also write any characters, including keywords, comments, or anything in Unicode form. For example, the word 'package', which is the first thing in a Java program, would be written: \u0070\u0061\u0063\u006B\u0061\u0067\u0065. The compiler's preprocessor handles these. EVEN BEFORE THE LEXICAL ANALYZER!!! So you can do this trick to escape from and re-emerge into a comment. Thus you could paste a comment that escapes the comment, includes executable code, and then re-opens the comment. Sort of like a SQL injection into Java source code.

      Here, for example, is a Hello World program:

      public class HelloWorld {
          public static void main( String... args ) {
              System.out.println( "Hello World" );
          }
      }

      Here is an alternate way to write exactly the same thing:

      \u0070\u0075\u0062\u006C\u0069\u0063 \u0063\u006C\u0061\u0073\u0073 \u0048\u0065\u006C\u006C\u006F\u0057\u006F\u0072\u006C\u0064 \u007B
          \u0070\u0075\u0062\u006C\u0069\u0063 \u0073\u0074\u0061\u0074\u0069\u0063 \u0076\u006F\u0069\u0064 \u006D\u0061\u0069\u006E\u0028 \u0053\u0074\u0072\u0069\u006E\u0067\u002E\u002E\u002E \u0061\u0072\u0067\u0073 \u0029 \u007B
              \u0053\u0079\u0073\u0074\u0065\u006D\u002E\u006F\u0075\u0074\u002E\u0070\u0072\u0069\u006E\u0074\u006C\u006E\u0028 \u0022\u0048\u0065\u006C\u006C\u006F \u0057\u006F\u0072\u006C\u0064\u0022 \u0029\u003B
          \u007D
      \u007D

      And the Java compiler happily compiles it.

      Now if only Emoji characters could be used as identifiers. Or a language that uses Emojis as its keywords. But I guess we have to live within the limitations of current programming languages. Drat!

      • (Score: 3, Funny) by DannyB on Friday March 09, @05:09PM

        by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 09, @05:09PM (#650065)

        Despite the above, they have not come and involuntarily committed me yet.

  • (Score: 2) by DarkMorph on Friday March 09, @09:47PM

    by DarkMorph (674) on Friday March 09, @09:47PM (#650248)
    Just drop by Nerd Fonts [nerdfonts.com] and grab your favourite monospace terminal font, then leverage all the extra goodies and transform your shell and editor as far as you want to take it.

    I never understood why the powerline stuff insists on cramming Python down your throat. I just use the Unicode glyphs accordingly in configs. For myself I've set up Inconsolate LGC to address Latin and Cyrillics, and the M+ pack for CJK, and they blend together well!
  • (Score: 3, Informative) by bradley13 on Sunday March 11, @08:32AM

    by bradley13 (3053) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 11, @08:32AM (#650843) Homepage Journal

    As mentioned in an earlier comment, I'm not fussy about fonts. I just did a brief comparison of three fonts:

    - Courier New: Sucks eggs for programming. For example, there is no obvious way to distinguish the digit zero from the letter O. One is fatter than the other, but which? The digit 1 and the letter l are also rather close in appearance. The font also looks lighter than the other fonts, making it more difficult to read.

    - Anonymous Pro: I like the slash through the digit zero (as opposed to the dot used by most fonts). However, the characters are visibly pixelated, which was acceptable 20 years ago, but not any longer. It is also rather light, making it more difficult to read.

    - Source Code Pro: At first glance, very clean looking, however: I'm not a font expert, but the apparently font sizes are only a suggestion? The character sizes at any particular font size (say, 10pt) are significantly taller than all other fonts, meaning fewer lines on the screen. Reduce the font size so that the line-height is the same, and the characters are then narrower. Adjust the fonts so that the characters are visually the same size, and the initial impression of clarity disappears.

    - Monospace: The default in Eclipse, which is where I spend most of my programming time. Visually, the heaviest of the fonts, which makes it easy to read. Possibly it's just what I'm used to, but I see no reason to change. Source Code Pro would be second choice, but the increased line height would mean less code on the screen, which would be a significant disadvantage.

    --
    Everyone is somebody else's weirdo.
  • (Score: 2) by SubiculumHammer on Monday March 12, @05:29AM

    by SubiculumHammer (5191) on Monday March 12, @05:29AM (#651213)
  • (Score: 2) by Arik on Monday March 12, @02:44PM (3 children)

    by Arik (4543) on Monday March 12, @02:44PM (#651345)
    All of the poll options are total fail. Not one of them is capable of doing the job of a font, "programmers" or otherwise. Not one of them can be used to display text with consistent clarity and unambiguity. It appears someone thought it would be funny to have a poll where all the answers are absurdly poor. Comic relief?

    This font sucks less: https://www.marksimonson.com/fonts/view/anonymous-pro
    --
    "If Evolution Is Outlawed, Only Outlaws Will Evolve."
    • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13, @03:25PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13, @03:25PM (#651842)

      Comic relief?

      Comic Sans relief! ;-)

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 14, @12:45PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 14, @12:45PM (#652324)

      Look who's complaining about fonts! The irony, it burns.

      • (Score: 3, Informative) by tangomargarine on Wednesday March 21, @08:12PM

        by tangomargarine (667) on Wednesday March 21, @08:12PM (#656312)

        It's not ironic; it's consistent with what he's saying. The default SN font allegedly sucks just like every other default font so he changed it.

        --
        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13, @03:10PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13, @03:10PM (#651836)

    Real programmers don't need fonts. They just toggle bits.

  • (Score: 2) by Unixnut on Wednesday March 14, @10:41PM (2 children)

    by Unixnut (5779) on Wednesday March 14, @10:41PM (#652645)

    After spending ages jumping around different terminal fonts (which to me are the same as programming fonts, as I use terminal editors) I finally found one years ago which hit all the right spots for me:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inconsolata [wikipedia.org]

    Not sure why, but this font really made my eyes less sore from all day screen staring, so it matters what font you have. I squint less, and I can even use the terminal without my glasses for extended periods of time when that font is set. It improved my productivity just because I could take fewer brakes and stare at the screen longer before my eyes got too tired.

    Its come to the point where it bugs me if I don't have that font set up on the machine I am using, at least on virtual consoles (the real consoles, on a proper CRT monitor, are lovely to behold, but that is a rare thing to experience these days).

    • (Score: 2) by turgid on Tuesday March 20, @09:04PM (1 child)

      by turgid (4318) on Tuesday March 20, @09:04PM (#655617) Journal

      I use vim 7.3 in an xterm on Slackware and I use whatever the default font in xterm is. At work we use eclipse officially but I still do my editing in vim in an xterm where I am about ten times as productive and it doesn't crash...

      --
      Don't let Righty keep you down. #freearistarchus!!!
      • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Wednesday March 21, @08:10PM

        by tangomargarine (667) on Wednesday March 21, @08:10PM (#656309)

        I've spent most of the last few years at work(s) in Cygwin emacs. After looking it up, apparently the font is Lucida Console 10pt. Some caps and small letters aren't the easiest to tell apart, though.

        I've found usually I get used to whatever the program default is unless I change it right when I start using it after the install. Seem to remember the XFCE console defaults to some ugly font I'd usually change.

        --
        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
  • (Score: 2) by termigator on Monday March 19, @11:41PM

    by termigator (4271) on Monday March 19, @11:41PM (#655192)

    Liberation Mono is what I have been using recently. I've tried other fonts mentioned in other posts, but Liberation Mono is my preferred choice. Use it in gvim and terminal windows.

    Not a fan of spacing in Source Code Pro, making it less readable than some other fonts. I used to use Lucida Console, but compared to Liberation Mono, it looks scrunched. I guess useful if vertical real estate is a concern, but I am used to working in 80x24 character windows, so I go for readability over verticial size.

  • (Score: 2) by turgid on Tuesday March 20, @09:00PM (1 child)

    by turgid (4318) on Tuesday March 20, @09:00PM (#655614) Journal

    You can't beat the good old Sinclair 8x8 pixel font [dafont.com] from the ZX-80, ZX-81 and then the ZX Spectrum (adding lower case and ASCII). I wrote my first C program on a Sinclair Spectrum 128 in HiSoft C in 1987. The 256x192 pixel screen could display 32 columns and 24 lines of text. Some programs had their own 6x8 or even 4x8 fonts and custom print routines to cram more onto the screen. It all got a bit fuzzy on those old analogue TVs.

    --
    Don't let Righty keep you down. #freearistarchus!!!
    • (Score: 2) by isostatic on Wednesday March 21, @09:30AM

      by isostatic (365) on Wednesday March 21, @09:30AM (#656000) Journal

      192 pixels high on a sinclair in PAL high would be 3 active lines per pixel, so each character is 24 lines high. Ignoring overscan. That would be about 5mm, or about half a mm per pixel. Clearly depending on the tube will depend on how definite edges are (a trinitron will be better than a shadow mask)

      Does that sound about right?

  • (Score: 1) by west on Sunday March 25, @12:14PM

    by west (6884) on Sunday March 25, @12:14PM (#657870)

    dejavu sans mono

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