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If you could only have one piece of SN swag, what would it be?

Displaying poll results.
Cap
  8% 12 votes
T-Shirt
  21% 29 votes
Stickers
  8% 12 votes
Mug
  29% 41 votes
Keychain
  2% 3 votes
Other (Specify)
  10% 14 votes
Ncommander's undying love
  19% 27 votes
138 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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(1)
  • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 07, @07:25PM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 07, @07:25PM (#967960)

    How 'bout rolling papers?

    • (Score: 2) by Valkor on Sunday March 08, @12:07AM

      by Valkor (4253) on Sunday March 08, @12:07AM (#968020)

      branded BICs are always good. great advertising especially for head shops. it'd work great here!

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday March 17, @04:15PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 17, @04:15PM (#972304) Journal

      How about a Soylent News branded version of systemd ?

      --
      To avoid controversy about whether array indexes begin at 0 or 1, I propose a compromise: 0.5.
  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by martyb on Saturday March 07, @08:12PM (8 children)

    by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 07, @08:12PM (#967977) Journal

    IIRC, within the past year or so, Ars Technica made a YubiKey available as part of some promotion. I checked the Zazzle store where our SoylentNews swag is on sale [zazzle.com] (check it out!) but could not find anything like it that we could offer. Do any Soylentils have a lead on how we could make that available?

    --
    Wit is intellect, dancing.
    • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Sunday March 08, @04:42PM (1 child)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 08, @04:42PM (#968207) Homepage Journal

      Wouldn't ours be a Soykey?

      --
      Joe and Gretchen?
      • (Score: 3, Funny) by martyb on Monday March 09, @02:48AM

        by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 09, @02:48AM (#968390) Journal

        Wouldn't ours be a Soykey?

        Oh, most Soytenly! [youtube.com] =)

        =)

        On a more serious note... I like the idea! Though I can't begin to think of how we could work that onto the item. May end up being an "in-crowd" meta-term we use to refer to one on the site, instead.

        That is, of course, if we could ever arrange to offer one!

        --
        Wit is intellect, dancing.
    • (Score: 2) by Gaaark on Tuesday March 10, @09:24PM

      by Gaaark (41) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 10, @09:24PM (#969299) Journal

      +1Like

      --
      --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by Snospar on Wednesday March 11, @09:58AM

      by Snospar (5366) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday March 11, @09:58AM (#969577)

      I came in to say a USB Flash drive but you've changed my mind. YubiKey for me please.

    • (Score: 2) by arslan on Sunday March 15, @09:36PM

      by arslan (3462) on Sunday March 15, @09:36PM (#971682)

      Wow great idea. +1 for me. In fact I don't even mind "paying" to fund SN as part of a "package" to get a yubikey even.. win win for everyone.

    • (Score: 2) by Fnord666 on Sunday March 29, @11:43PM (2 children)

      by Fnord666 (652) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 29, @11:43PM (#977060)

      Wired also gave a way a YubiKey with a subscription. No idea how to get them though. I'll take a YubiHSM if you're giving stuff away.

      You can probably reach them for special orders at https://www.yubico.com/support/contact/ [yubico.com]

      I guess my question would be: Do we support 2FA with Yubikeys?

      • (Score: 2) by martyb on Monday March 30, @01:08AM (1 child)

        by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 30, @01:08AM (#977072) Journal
        Good question! I doubt that we do support 2FA, but if there is sufficient interest, I think that would make it a high priority update!
        --
        Wit is intellect, dancing.
        • (Score: 3, Interesting) by TheRaven on Monday March 30, @03:43PM

          by TheRaven (270) on Monday March 30, @03:43PM (#977246) Journal
          I'm starting to like things that use WebAuthn. I use it with Windows Hello (stores the key in the TPM, access controlled by biometrics) and with GitHub's SoftU2F on Mac, which stores the keys in the keychain and provides an emulated U2F device. In both cases, the credentials are more secure than a password stored in a key manager. The macOS version is less secure, because a root compromise can extract the key, but a compromise of my account can only do online attacks, it can't exfiltrate the key on either version (WebAuthn shares a public keypair and each login just signs something with the private key that can be validated by the public key).
          --
          sudo mod me up
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 07, @10:04PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 07, @10:04PM (#968000)

    So as to lure in unsuspecting innocents.

  • (Score: 4, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 07, @10:15PM (33 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 07, @10:15PM (#968003)

    Why you should learn to code:

    1. You will be paid poverty wages. Six figure salaries are a myth told by the tech industry to scam you.
    2. You will spend your career copying open source code into proprietary products and services. The tech industry does not innovate ever. Innovation is done by unpaid students and volunteers who are too naive to know they are being scammed.
    3. Your career will end at age 30 regardless of how skilled and accomplished you are. "Keep your skills up" is tech industry propaganda that means keep your age down.
    4. You will not find employment after your career ends at age 30. Everyone outside the tech industry will be envious of your coding ability. Nobody outside the tech industry will understand why you cannot simply get a high paid job in the tech industry.
    5. You can continue coding after age 30. The tech industry will gladly take your open source code and pay you exactly nothing for your work.
    6. A ten year career at poverty wages is not enough to retire. You will die poor.

    Learn to code. Die poor.

    • (Score: 4, Funny) by The Mighty Buzzard on Sunday March 08, @04:34AM (28 children)

      Have you considered you might just suck at coding?

      --
      Thank you, Covid-19, for proving for all time that college isn't essential but liquor stores are.
      • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @06:15AM (23 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @06:15AM (#968106)

        Well let me see, I have straight A grades in computer science, a bachelor's degree in computer science, a master's degree in computer science, started multiple open source projects, contributed to many more open source projects. I am especially good at optimizing and debugging, and on one occasion I doubled the speed of an open source app with one line of code. No I do not suck at coding. And yet I cannot get a coding job.

        Have you considered the reality that the tech industry is massive fraud.

        Look at the open source license credits in every consumer electronics product made today (your TV for example) and every big name app produced today (your web browser for example) and you will see how billion dollar corporations take from the open source community and give back nothing. Who do you think produces all that open source software for the tech industry to take without compensation? Unpaid volunteer open source developers like me. Who do you think throws together all that open source code for billion dollar corporations to exploit for profit? Underpaid young naive fools living in poverty who are promised a bright future right up until they are replaced when they turn 30.

        Keep chasing that mythical six figure coder salary. You get it the day after never.

        Never stop coding open source for free. Somebody has to produce value for the tech industry or the whole house of cards collapses.

        Learn to code, kiddies. You can be like Peter Pan. Never ever dare to grow up because the dream ends at 30.

        • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @07:01AM (15 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @07:01AM (#968116)

          Keep chasing that mythical six figure coder salary. You get it the day after never.

          That's odd. I know several (middle-aged white men, no less!) folks who have those six-figure coding jobs you say are mythical.

          No I do not suck at coding. And yet I cannot get a coding job.

          Have you considered (as seems likely based on the tone of your post) that it may be that you can't get the job you want because you're a bitter, whinging asshole?

          That's not a swipe at you personally. In fact, your post *screams* "I'm an entitled asshole and you fucking people just don't understand how wonderful I am. Fuck you!"

          I know that's just the kind of person I'd want to hire! Why don't you send me your resume?

          • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @07:55AM (14 children)

            by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @07:55AM (#968127)

            Understand this, you patronizing asshole. I was less bitter when I was young enough and naive enough to believe blatant lies. I was once optimistic enough to believe that natural talent for coding would naturally lead to gainful employment as a coder. I am quite fully disillusioned by now. This is the tone of someone who knows how fraudulent your tech industry really is. There is only one kind of person you want to hire: young, stupid, cheap, and soon replaced by younger, stupider, and cheaper. Free is even better than cheap, and boy oh boy, do you types know how to rip off open source for free labor. There is an endless supply of fresh college students who are just starting out in your world, eager to believe your lies about six figure coding jobs and coders who live to middle age. Fresh young college students will work for free coding open source for you just so long as you can maintain the illusion that they will get paid some day. And when the day comes that they finally realize you are a liar, that day is when they tell you to go fuck yourself. Everything works out fine for you though. You just repeat the same lies to the next batch of fresh college students.

            Learn to code, kiddos. Free open source is definitely not free unpaid labor to enrich billionaires.

            • (Score: 0, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @08:40AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @08:40AM (#968135)

              Thanks for confirming my initial impressions, friend.

              It's nice to be reminded that I'm a pretty good judge of people.

              As to your predicament, I suggest heavy self-medication.

              Peace out!

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 09, @07:02PM (1 child)

              by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 09, @07:02PM (#968603)

              Yeah, I'd totally hire this ass-hat....

              With that attitude? Yeah.... Riiiiiiight....

              • (Score: 3, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 09, @10:47PM

                by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 09, @10:47PM (#968737)

                If he really is that big of an ass-hat then he should try politics.

            • (Score: 2, Insightful) by shrewdsheep on Tuesday March 10, @05:25PM (10 children)

              by shrewdsheep (5215) on Tuesday March 10, @05:25PM (#969178)

              Maybe it helps you to see that what you experience(d) is not specific to tech. There is hard skills (coding, expertise in the subject matter) and soft skills. Unfortunately, the hard skills only play a minor part in determining who gets promoted, gets credit or respect. The soft skills are often much more important as defined by your mode of interpersonal interaction. Soft skills is not a really positive term in this context, it comprises aggressiveness, boastfulness and other egotistic traits (most the time veiled in hypocritical kiss-ass behavior or seeming modesty). This is true for tech, science (arguably more so), public services, politics, basically all workplaces with competitive incentives.

              • (Score: 3, Interesting) by barbara hudson on Tuesday March 10, @07:32PM (4 children)

                And this is part of the ongoing lie. The simple fact is that there are nowhere near enough jobs for coders to advance into management, especially when most of the management jobs are already spoken for by people related to existing management. Has nothing to do with soft skills and everything to do with who you know (and no, ass kissing isn't a soft skill, it's a con artist skill). Then again , given how much of the industry is based on con games, that explains a lot.

                The industry is dying. The consequences of massive consolidation are evident in a lack of innovation, and the need to exploit the poor via gig "platforms " because that haven't come up with new ways to add actual value to the overall economy.

                We've been had. But keep plugging out code for your masters at google, Facebook, and amazon to use to further exploit the masses rather than help them improve their economic well-being and independence. Stupid is as stupid does.

                • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 11, @03:04PM (2 children)

                  by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 11, @03:04PM (#969651)

                  Ah, so you are the bitter AC... Perfect match. I wouldn't hire you either. Luckily we are still allowed to discriminate against people with a bad attitude, though probably not for long in Canada if you win all your lawsuits.

                  • (Score: 2) by barbara hudson on Wednesday March 11, @04:18PM (1 child)

                    No, I'm not the bitter AC. I posted under it specifically so that people would realize that I'm not the only one with the same sentiment. Do you really believe that I'm the only person in the last 20 years to realize that the open source movement has been co-opted by the big companies and that there is no other way forward to make money for small independent developers except to go to a closed-source license if they want to make money selling their fostfare, because RMS was full of crap?

                    • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 12, @12:55AM

                      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 12, @12:55AM (#969959)

                      Do you really believe that I'm the only person in the last 20 years to realize...

                      No, with the Sith there are always two

                • (Score: 3, Insightful) by TheRaven on Monday March 30, @03:58PM

                  by TheRaven (270) on Monday March 30, @03:58PM (#977256) Journal

                  The simple fact is that there are nowhere near enough jobs for coders to advance into management

                  Coders only 'advance into management' in companies with a crappy promotion model. In other companies, they advance to senior development (or possibly architect) roles. There are some skills common to developers and management, but most of the skills that they need are different. HP championed this model (in the '70s or '80s), where a person's manager may be more junior to the person, because a small but specialised engineering project may need senior engineers but only junior managers.

                  --
                  sudo mod me up
              • (Score: 2) by Mykl on Monday March 23, @03:44AM (4 children)

                by Mykl (1112) on Monday March 23, @03:44AM (#974303)

                I came here to say something similar, though I have a more favourable view of soft skills to you. Too many developers think that their tech skills, and tech skills alone, are the sum of their value to an organisation. Further, anyone who demonstrates soft skills such as diplomacy, negotiation and managing upward is a "kiss-ass".

                I started as a junior developer (Bachelor of Science, majoring in Computer Science), and am currently the manager of just under 200 technical and management consultants for a professional services firm. Over the years I've dealt with many technically talented people. Some of them have been wonderful to work with, and some have just been assholes. Any day of the week I'd take an 'average' developer who is willing to work collaboratively with others over a 'skilled' asshole who acts like a prima donna.

                If you have deep technical skills and can't find work, it's probably because you have under-developed interview/social skills. These are just as important as your technical skills and only become more important as you work at higher levels. Calling everyone else a kiss-ass just shows that you haven't bothered to recognise the value of other skills, probably because of your arrogance about the superiority of your technical skills.

                Coffee requires both ground Coffee Beans and hot water. Having one without the other is deeply unsatisfying to the drinker.

                • (Score: 1) by shrewdsheep on Monday March 23, @05:37PM (1 child)

                  by shrewdsheep (5215) on Monday March 23, @05:37PM (#974489)

                  These (soft skills) are just as important as your technical skills and only become more important as you work at higher levels. Calling everyone else a kiss-ass just shows that you haven't bothered to recognise the value of other skills, probably because of your arrogance about the superiority of your technical skills.

                  Thank you for providing some nuance and quite correctly characterizing my personality traits :-).

                  You mention the skills "diplomacy, negotiation and managing upward" (the latter I do not understand). Going into reflective mode, you will recoginise that these skills all include dispositions making it easier for you as a manager. The ideal worker is rough on the edges though, is independently thinking and would have the manager serving him instead of the other way round. My point being that the filters in place are never geared towards the technical goal, but towards the accountability to the next level in the hierarchy. This, almost by definition, will result in unjust decisions. I am personally on both sides, trying to rise through the ranks, but also being responsible for hiring and managing of people (not at your order of magnitude though). Honestly, after an interview I am most the time at a complete loss at whom to hire and how to do justice to the situation, and I am certain that most of my decisions were suboptimal.

                  • (Score: 2) by PiMuNu on Monday March 30, @01:51PM

                    by PiMuNu (3823) on Monday March 30, @01:51PM (#977197)

                    > would have the manager serving him

                    I think managing upward means helping the manager to know what worker needs to more effectively do his job. "Sorry to nag, but my laptop is busted so my project is gonna be late. Could you chase IT to get me a new one?" ... "I notice Jimbob's stuff is running a bit late, I can't get started on my thing without his stuff. Would it be okay if I lended him a hand?" etc

                    > would have the manager serving him instead of the other way round

                    Sure, and good workers will make this happen (without being too irritating to the manager). This is "managing upward".

                • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 29, @11:49PM

                  by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 29, @11:49PM (#977061)

                  Any day of the week I'd take an 'average' developer who is willing to work collaboratively with others over a 'skilled' asshole who acts like a prima donna.

                  This. So much this. I've run development teams off and on for 25 years and this is absolutely true.

                • (Score: 3, Interesting) by TheRaven on Monday March 30, @04:25PM

                  by TheRaven (270) on Monday March 30, @04:25PM (#977268) Journal

                  I like to frame this as additive impact versus multiplicative impact. Additive impact is the amount that you contribute by yourself, multiplicative impact is the amount that you increase other people's productivity, including things like mentorship, constructive feedback, and so on. On medium to large teams, a slightly above average multiplicative factor makes a huge impact, much more than a large additive impact. Imagine a team of 20 people. You have one developer who is a great hacker, 50% more effective than normal but doesn't contribute to the team. You have another developer who is an average developer but makes everyone 10% more efficient by improving CI systems, doing useful code reviews, and so on. One has an additive effect of 1.5 and a multiplicative effect of 1, the other has an additive effect of 1 and a multiplicative effect of 1.1. With 20 people on the team, one developer adds 1.5 to your team, the other adds 2.

                  In practice, it's actually worse because a lot of those 'highly skilled' developers are toxic and so their multiplicative factor is closer to 0.8, or even lower. On a team of 20, they demotivate the team and make life harder for everyone else enough that they are costing the equivalent of four people's worth of productivity. They need to be four times as productive as your average just to break even and that factor increases the larger your team gets. They are simply not worth hiring.

                  There is a corollary, of course, that some people have a negative additive effect: they introduce bugs or design flaws that take more time to fix than their overall positive contributions and if they'd just stop writing code then the project would move faster.

                  --
                  sudo mod me up
        • (Score: 3, Funny) by Runaway1956 on Sunday March 08, @04:51PM (4 children)

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 08, @04:51PM (#968209) Homepage Journal

          Ya know - your post is almost sorta kinda satisfying, to me, a working craftsman. Back when the illegals were pouring across the border, and taking away tradesmen's jobs, everyone in tech chortled, "Well, you should have gone to school, and learned a tech job! We're safe where we are!"

          Heh. Trickle down really works. A lot of those displaced trademen and their kids moved on to tech jobs. And, the mediocrities already in those jobs are being displaced.

          Meanwhile, the best of the best in the trades, as well as the tech industry still have good, solid careers ahead of them. Provided, of course, they are willing to play the office games, and maybe kiss the right asses.

          Maybe you really are as good as you say you are. I can't judge that, but I know that beating your own drum isn't an indicator that you can be believed.

          Another poster, further down, suggested that maybe you can't get a good job because you're an asshole. Possibly true. Think about it. And, if you're an asshole, just own up to it, and be proud. If cocksuckers can cavort around the streets of our cities playing proud, then assholes can do the same.

          --
          Joe and Gretchen?
          • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Sunday March 08, @07:18PM (3 children)

            by Ethanol-fueled (2792) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 08, @07:18PM (#968257) Homepage

            95% of San Diego's technician jobs are ratfucked by cheap beaners literally making minimum wage. The situation is so bad you have common legal grey areas of noncitizens and DACA caca's working in ITAR environments and even in facilities with closed areas. As if you can really trust cartel-owned Sephardic Jews masquerading as Mexicans around your national secrets.

            These were jobs that were formerly at least $20/hr jobs. If it's a case of being in a union and so a nice wage is guaranteed, only U.S. citizens should be hired. It should be illegal for unions to hire illegals. And when it comes to hiring minorities, well, Whites should be hired first.

            • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Monday March 09, @05:42PM (2 children)

              by Freeman (732) on Monday March 09, @05:42PM (#968560) Journal

              It should be illegal for unions to hire illegals.

              . . . by definition, isn't it . . . ?

              --
              "I said in my haste, All men are liars." Psalm 116:11
              • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 09, @08:14PM (1 child)

                by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 09, @08:14PM (#968647)

                Yeah, but big business pays big lobbyists to bribe the right politicians to take the teeth out of employer sanctions for hiring illegals. You'd think if the conservatives really hated illegal immigrants so much, they'd push for harsher penalties on employers. But they also know that the businesses employing trades are hanging on by a thread overall and are some of the most sensitive markets overall because of the time scales and total costs involved.

        • (Score: 2) by The Mighty Buzzard on Monday March 09, @12:40PM

          Six figures? Six figures is what I make when I feel like building up a nest egg but still want some fishing time. Seven figures isn't complicated, it's just more work and responsibility than I care for. On the low side of mid five figures, what I generally aim for nowadays, is working about one week out of six and turning all other offers down in favor of napping by the river with bells on my poles (or working on a church remodel of late). You too could partake in this lifestyle but you can't get it out of your head that working means punching a clock and having a boss.

          That or you're too much of a coward to take the risk. That's often the case with folks who spend their lives as someone else's bitch and then whine about it all the time.

          --
          Thank you, Covid-19, for proving for all time that college isn't essential but liquor stores are.
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20, @06:58AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20, @06:58AM (#973426)

          Then why not work for a shit soul sucking corporation at the bottom like the fast food and retail industries and use your programming powers to further the GNU project and/or free software? If it doesn't make a damn bit of difference? I'd love to see a replacement for Linux (the kernel), that is GPLv3. And make sure to donate to organizations that represent free software projects so we can defend ourselves in court when the need arises.

          Learn C and start hacking! You shouldn't have been working for shitty corporations in the first place, they contribute nothing to society except dependence on ignorance and convenience at the last, and at the worst they are actively working to build a totalitarian nightmare where we will be governed and controlled by facial recognition, behavior anlysis/modification/manipulation, and yablah blah...

          Ask the customer if they want frys with that, and go home and have FUN programming on REAL projects that serve the interest of the people.

      • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Sunday March 15, @10:29PM (2 children)

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Sunday March 15, @10:29PM (#971687)

        I learned to code in 1982, and seem to be valuable enough to my current employer today.

        We've got one guy who's pushing 70, and they keep him on for as many hours as he wants working remotely from 300 miles away.

      • (Score: 2) by PartTimeZombie on Tuesday March 17, @01:21AM

        by PartTimeZombie (4827) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 17, @01:21AM (#972067)

        I'm pretty sure that's our new resident A/C troll.

        As well as being an exploited master coder he's a flat-earther, an anti-vaxxer, and a believer in Plasma cosmology.

        Are you not entertained?

        No, I'm not either.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Cosmic Debris on Monday March 09, @12:34AM

      by Cosmic Debris (2086) on Monday March 09, @12:34AM (#968349)

      I prefer the old chestnut "Crime doesn't pay. Neither does coding."

    • (Score: 5, Interesting) by DannyB on Monday March 09, @03:30PM (2 children)

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 09, @03:30PM (#968502) Journal

      Maybe you're coding the wrong thing.

      At one point in my career (1987) I co-wrote this thing for the (classic) Macintosh called Timbuktu. It got our small company acquired by a bigger company. We had built this to help us support our accounting software over the phone. There was "Carbon Copy" for PCs, but nothing like that for Macintosh. When I started building it, my coworker and I weren't even sure if this could be done to have a remote GUI.

      For a few years it was a fantastic meteoric rise. Trade shows. Full page ads in MacWorld, etc. Awards at trade shows. (Aside: my coworker and I went to present at a larger Mac user group meeting in the midwest near us. We heard people talking excitedly about "real Mac programmers!". We snickered to ourselves. We were just a couple ordinary guys who started in a small town.)

      But eventually it leveled off.

      I ended up working on accounting products again. At the time I wondered if this wasn't a blessing in disguise. These products were stable. The customers for them weren't going away, soon, maybe never. It wasn't as glamorous as Timbuktu and related products that were developed. But it was steady and stable. I'm still doing that today.

      It more than adequately pays the bills. Through a number of changes, I'm now at a much larger corporation -- but I never changed jobs. Everything changed around me.

      The point

      Being a rockstar programmer on some glamorous award-winning product is fun, and for a time profitable, but boring business software is what makes the world go around. Today's glamorous thing might be to work at Google, or Facebook.

      There is more boring business software than most people realize. Every type of business needs specialized software. Several levels above my business unit, my employer makes software for cities, government, schools, lawyers, cabinet makers, hospitals, and other things. It's all boring. But it is stable, makes money, and isn't going away in the near future. How do they keep the store shelves stocked? Exchange medical records between offices? Send out natural gas utility bills, and keep track of meter readings, which meters are where in inventory or at what addresses, etc. There's more to computerize than is obvious.

      You might not get rich, but it is a living.

      --
      To avoid controversy about whether array indexes begin at 0 or 1, I propose a compromise: 0.5.
      • (Score: 2) by Joe Desertrat on Thursday April 02, @10:01PM (1 child)

        by Joe Desertrat (2454) on Thursday April 02, @10:01PM (#978463)

        There is more boring business software than most people realize. Every type of business needs specialized software.

        In my usage of said boring software over the years it seems to me that an awful lot of it is written poorly by people who have no idea what the end user is trying to or has to accomplish on a daily basis. Usually it works in a generic manner, it sort of does everything but does nothing well or completely. This is probably due to the fact that the buying decisions are made by people who have no idea what the end user is trying to or has to accomplish on a daily basis, or do and no longer care as they no longer have to do it themselves.

        If one could make software that is quickly customizable to a particular customer's needs it seems to me there could be a large market for that. Of course, it has to survive my point about who makes the buying decisions...

        • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Friday April 03, @03:20PM

          by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday April 03, @03:20PM (#978736) Journal

          That is true.

          From the early stages of my product's development (eg, the product I work on, but my employer owns it) we already had decades of experience in this market and understood our customers' business. We had already been through two green-screen text versions (eg, first and then major rewrite), one desktop GUI version (major rewrite), and then to the web. We pay attention to customer feedback. I am interested in feedback, especially negative feedback. In short, we've been doing this for a long time (decades). It's not some johnny-come-lately web application.

          The more customizable you make software, the more complex it is to design, maintain, then configure for a customer, and then use by the user. Definitely have necessary customizability. Avoid that which is unnecessary. Understand the customer's business and workflow. Design workflows around that.

          --
          To avoid controversy about whether array indexes begin at 0 or 1, I propose a compromise: 0.5.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @07:04AM (7 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @07:04AM (#968118)

    But If I'm actually going to *use* it, it needs to be *big*.

    Like this:
    https://www.amazon.com/Home-Basics-CM01586-Ceramic-Ounce/dp/B00NEINFGQ/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=22+oz+coffee+mugs [amazon.com]

    • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Sunday March 08, @04:55PM

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 08, @04:55PM (#968211) Homepage Journal

      Mugs are tough. If I'm going to buy one, it HAS TO BE portable. Like "travel mug" portable. I like Yeti mugs, but I won't buy one because 2nd amendment. There are couple cheaper brands competing with Yeti, so that's what I buy. It's got to be something that can be dropped and kicked around the yard, the car, or even at work, for me to spend money on it.

      --
      Joe and Gretchen?
    • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Monday March 09, @05:47PM (3 children)

      by Freeman (732) on Monday March 09, @05:47PM (#968561) Journal

      Make sure it's huge! That way you could be as cool as these two guys. https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https://i.ytimg.com/vi/rBA6rht6p6E/maxresdefault.jpg&f=1&nofb=1 [duckduckgo.com]

      --
      "I said in my haste, All men are liars." Psalm 116:11
    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday March 10, @04:17PM (1 child)

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 10, @04:17PM (#969140) Journal

      I don't drink Diet Coke from a mug.

      SN branded ordinary USB thumb drives might be nice.

      If AOL were still around, we might be drowning in AOL branded USB thumb drives. Not having that, it might be nice to have SN branded USB sticks.

      --
      To avoid controversy about whether array indexes begin at 0 or 1, I propose a compromise: 0.5.
      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Tuesday March 10, @04:30PM

        by Freeman (732) on Tuesday March 10, @04:30PM (#969150) Journal

        To have a steady supply of free USB drives, it'd almost be worth it.

        --
        "I said in my haste, All men are liars." Psalm 116:11
  • (Score: 3, Informative) by WizardFusion on Sunday March 08, @10:41AM (4 children)

    by WizardFusion (498) Subscriber Badge on Sunday March 08, @10:41AM (#968144) Journal

    Don't forget to have stuff in the other theme colours.
    I don't like the default red, much prefer the Chillax Blue.

    • (Score: 4, Funny) by martyb on Monday March 09, @02:56AM

      by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 09, @02:56AM (#968395) Journal

      Don't forget to have stuff in the other theme colours.
      I don't like the default red, much prefer the Chillax Blue.

      OMG PWNIES ftw!

      --
      Wit is intellect, dancing.
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by barbara hudson on Tuesday March 10, @07:46PM (2 children)

      Oh crap! I'm using the default and it looks greenish brown to me. That's why I've been referring to the other site as the other green site. Oh well, good thing I don't drive any more.

      As for mugs, they break. And after a while you get all coffeed out and realize that you don't really like it any more. I know, that's heresy, but it happens, mostly around spring time.

  • (Score: 2, Disagree) by fliptop on Sunday March 08, @04:41PM

    by fliptop (1666) on Sunday March 08, @04:41PM (#968206) Journal

    I wear mine proudly.

    --
    It's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide.
  • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @10:28PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 08, @10:28PM (#968310)

    ShitstainNews

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Mojibake Tengu on Monday March 09, @11:32AM

    by Mojibake Tengu (8598) on Monday March 09, @11:32AM (#968464) Journal

    RFID tag

    --
    Yeriḥo. Karthāgō. Sogdiana. Besièrs. 広島市 (Hiroshima-shi). For Love of God, what next?
  • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 10, @12:34PM (8 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 10, @12:34PM (#969010)

    In the true spirit of everyone trying to fuck each other up the ass.

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday March 10, @04:19PM (7 children)

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 10, @04:19PM (#969142) Journal

      Advertisements might be the alternative to branded merchandise and donations. With a gigantic helping of JavaScript.

      --
      To avoid controversy about whether array indexes begin at 0 or 1, I propose a compromise: 0.5.
      • (Score: 2) by barbara hudson on Tuesday March 10, @07:52PM (6 children)

        You can run ads without JavaScript. No need to be an intrusive son of a bitch - broadcast radio and TV don't track, newspapers, magazines, and books bought at the store don't track, it's only the fucked up internet that seems to think you need to track everything , and that's due to the "because we can" mentality.

        See all the tracking in China? That's going to be the norm everywhere "because we can".

        We need to have a law requiring sites to allow users to disable all JavaScript. Many sites won't let you in if you don't have it.

        • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday March 10, @09:03PM

          by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 10, @09:03PM (#969291) Journal

          You can run ads without JavaScript.

          I'll bet advertisers don't know that. They probably require JavaScript. Because . . .

          No need to be an intrusive son of a bitch

          Part of the job requirement of advertisers.

          --
          To avoid controversy about whether array indexes begin at 0 or 1, I propose a compromise: 0.5.
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 11, @12:13AM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 11, @12:13AM (#969359)

          Many sites won't let you in if you have a javascript capable browser with javascript off. But switch to something like links and hey presto you can get in through the disability backdoor.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 11, @03:19PM (2 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 11, @03:19PM (#969659)

          We need to have a law requiring sites to allow users to disable all JavaScript.

          Very funny!

          Many sites won't let you in if you don't have it.

          Yeah, freedom sucks, doesn't it? If they don't want you in, you should take the hint!

          • (Score: 2) by barbara hudson on Wednesday March 11, @04:21PM (1 child)

            I'm just amazed that Americans aren't complaining about their rights under the ADA being totally broken. Bunch of wimps. Rights need to be exercised or you lose them.
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 11, @07:15PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 11, @07:15PM (#969758)

              Americans don't need "rights". They have Trump! Cruisin' down the boulevard. What could possibly be better?

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Gaaark on Tuesday March 10, @09:25PM

    by Gaaark (41) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 10, @09:25PM (#969300) Journal

    For Ethanol...or Ari?

    Do they do buck-toothed dolls?

    --
    --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 10, @10:15PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 10, @10:15PM (#969324)

    "I answered a SN poll and all I got was this lousy T-shirt!"

  • (Score: 3, Funny) by RandomFactor on Tuesday March 10, @11:04PM (2 children)

    by RandomFactor (3682) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 10, @11:04PM (#969331) Journal

    I was actually thinking of reselling those dog cones of shame at 100% markup as "Device to help keep you from touching your face", maybe call them CoronaCones or something.

    --
    Just building something huge and sticking guns on it. It's....Super American. ---Kogoro Kurata
    • (Score: 2) by MostCynical on Wednesday March 11, @09:38AM

      by MostCynical (2589) on Wednesday March 11, @09:38AM (#969574)

      cones?
      probably more popular to get SN logos printed on this sort of cone [laleggepertutti.it]

      --
      tau = 300. Greek circles must have been weird.
    • (Score: 2, Funny) by Kitsune008 on Wednesday March 11, @03:09PM

      by Kitsune008 (9054) on Wednesday March 11, @03:09PM (#969653)

      Those 'dog cones' are referred to as 'Elizabethan Collars' in veterinary medicine.

      The first time I saw one on a dog, I had two main questions:
      1) Why were you trying to pour your dog through a funnel?
      2) If you insist on pouring dogs through funnels, why not use a smaller dog, or a bigger funnel?

      Once I learned the real purpose of the collars, I lost all fascination of them.

  • (Score: 2) by Subsentient on Saturday March 14, @02:41AM

    I prefer NCommander's undying love. His warm, milky, creamy love. Taken rectally, of course. Nyessss

    --
    "The foolish man remains closed and tight, the wise man stretches himself in every way" -Goa Tse
  • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 16, @01:41AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 16, @01:41AM (#971748)

    SN swag securely holding my frankfurter n beans.

  • (Score: 2) by dltaylor on Thursday March 19, @12:52AM

    by dltaylor (4693) on Thursday March 19, @12:52AM (#973005)

    Years ago EFF had bootable business card CDs. To many machines these days with no optical drive, and I doubt those would work in slot drives, anyway.

    A logo'd keychain with a bootable image of Kali, Tails, (insert distro food fight here) would be worth some Basic Units of Currency.

    I have an old Samsung ogg/mp3 player with gig of USB storage. Could walk past security looking for USB sticks and they had no clue. Put some "leather" over the USB device and it should work as well.

  • (Score: 2) by Aighearach on Saturday March 21, @02:55AM

    by Aighearach (2621) on Saturday March 21, @02:55AM (#973724)

    Other: CowboyNeal's undying love.

  • (Score: 1) by AlwaysNever on Saturday March 21, @05:09PM

    by AlwaysNever (5817) on Saturday March 21, @05:09PM (#973873)

    I'm not going in the streets wearing any kind of branded merchandise. But I could use a branded mug at home while I scroll through SN in my Centrino-powered laptop.

  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 26, @10:48AM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 26, @10:48AM (#975800)

    ... SN branded toilet paper.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 27, @02:54AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 27, @02:54AM (#976193)

      with shit pattern motif

    • (Score: 2) by SomeGuy on Friday March 27, @06:35PM

      by SomeGuy (5632) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 27, @06:35PM (#976403)

      ... SoylentNews THE FLAMETHROWER! The kids love that one.

      And oddly appropriate for this site too.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 03, @10:56PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 03, @10:56PM (#978896)

      Man, these days I'd resell it make a fortune!

  • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Monday March 30, @04:54PM

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 30, @04:54PM (#977276) Journal

    Unicode 13.0 doesn't need a Fork. It already has a fork and other table service ware ware.

    What it needs is a coat hanger hangar symbol.

    --
    To avoid controversy about whether array indexes begin at 0 or 1, I propose a compromise: 0.5.
  • (Score: 1) by exa on Tuesday March 31, @01:39PM

    by exa (9931) on Tuesday March 31, @01:39PM (#977595)

    Soylent news soy bar.

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