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For my devices that support it, I have implemented IPv6 . . .

Displaying poll results.
on none of my devices
  48% 56 votes
on some of my devices
  16% 19 votes
on all of my devices
  17% 20 votes
What is IPv6?
  7% 9 votes
I use token ring, you insensitive clod
  10% 12 votes
116 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Subsentient on Saturday July 06, @10:09PM (5 children)

    by Subsentient (1111) on Saturday July 06, @10:09PM (#1363334) Homepage Journal

    Do I want IPv6? Absolutely. Does IPv6 constantly cause connection timeouts and errors due to a configuration issue somewhere in the pipeline, possibly with my ISP? Also absolutely.
    I force IPv4 because of that.

    --
    "It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." -Jiddu Krishnamurti
    • (Score: 1) by Runaway1956 on Sunday July 07, @01:21AM (3 children)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Sunday July 07, @01:21AM (#1363351) Journal

      Ditto. And, I'll note that my Android doesn't even offer me an option to enable IPv6. There must be a reason that neither Motorola nor Verizon have implemented it. IPv4 just works, no matter where I am, there's no point in fooling with it.

      --
      We've finally beat Medicare! - Houseplant in Chief
      • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 07, @04:54AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 07, @04:54AM (#1363358)

        Most of the major ISPs own big chunks of the IPv4 space and many smaller ones have been using CGN in a NAT44 configuration for what feels like forever. If you've already invested in that ecosystem with more than enough capacity, using techniques like NAT46, IVI, provider 464XLAT, etc. isn't that much more difficult. A lot of the enterprise-level network gear is already IPv6 internally and can handle it just fine. But it really comes back to the chicken-and-egg problem combined with the ability for each side to point their finger at the other when something breaks.

      • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 08, @02:38AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 08, @02:38AM (#1363414)

        So I called a contact I have at Verizon to inquire about IPv6 for you since I was curious what they do. He told me that Verizon has a somewhat complex layout. Anything 4G LTE or above is IPv6 only for media services (SMS, MMS, VoLTE, etc.). The other APNs are dual stacked with IPv4 behind CGN on an IPv6 core. Below non-CDMA 3G is completely dual stacked and connects to their IPv6 core using embedded addresses. Their CDMA network is IPv4 only but uses their same core network after some magic. Since you sounded like you had a late enough phone, he wondered if maybe you kept swapping SIM cards to new phones instead of upgrading cards as necessary. That or a bug in how their carrier settings interact with Android on Motorola might come into play. He said he'd pass it along for them to look into since it might explain some of what they've seen in their network traffic.

        • (Score: 1) by Runaway1956 on Monday July 08, @11:23AM

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday July 08, @11:23AM (#1363434) Journal

          Interesting. Thanks, from me, and from Verizon, I think.

          No, I got this SIM card new when I got the phone. I presume it's a new card, and not an old stock card, if that makes any difference at all. Ditto with my wife's phone, but she's not on Verizon.

          --
          We've finally beat Medicare! - Houseplant in Chief
    • (Score: 5, Funny) by DannyB on Monday July 08, @02:13PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Monday July 08, @02:13PM (#1363445) Journal

      Mine is disabled for physical reasons. The wider network addresses make it necessary to drill larger holes to run network cables.

      --
      Trump is a poor man's idea of a rich man, a weak man's idea of a strong man, and a stupid man's idea of a smart man.
  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 07, @05:15AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 07, @05:15AM (#1363359)

    You guys provided the wrong insensitive clod answer. Token ring is perfectly capable of running IP on top. Instead you should have used IPX, DDP, DRP, or IDP. IPX is probably the most recognized but DDP may have been used by more people.

  • (Score: 3, Informative) by krokodilerian on Sunday July 07, @07:00AM (7 children)

    by krokodilerian (6979) on Sunday July 07, @07:00AM (#1363364)

    Seriously, almost everything comes with IPv6 on by default, ISPs just provide it, you might not even know you're using it. The people that disable it usually find out it's not the problem (it's too often DNS), but hey, let's leave it disabled, because "just in case".
    (I suggest also disabling v4)

    • (Score: 1) by Runaway1956 on Sunday July 07, @06:57PM (6 children)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Sunday July 07, @06:57PM (#1363382) Journal

      almost everything comes with IPv6 on by default

      OK, you prompted me to look at my phone again. I found nothing, so I did a search for "enable IPv6 on Android". Well, apparently, Android does have IPv6, because I found a couple of guides to enable/disable it. But, my phone does not display the options necessary to either enable, or disable, IPv6. At this point, I can only speculate whether Motorola decided to not enable it, or the carrier's software has modified the available settings. To be clear, I'm not using a ten or fifteen year old phone, it's a 2022 model. Looking at my wife's phone, same model, but a year older with less RAM and less storage, I find the same situation. So, I question - does almost everything come with IPv6 enabled by default?

      Since I am talking about my own phone, I'll tell you what I did do. The phone constantly searches for 5G, connects, then drops connection, reverting back to 4G. It's a pretty common problem in rural areas, it seems, from the searches I did when I bought the phone. The solution is to simply disable 5G, leaving you with a nice, stable 4G connection. Of course 4g isn't as fast, but it's stable.

      --
      We've finally beat Medicare! - Houseplant in Chief
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10, @03:01AM (4 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10, @03:01AM (#1363607)

        Yes, it mostly does.

        When you visit https://ip6.me [ip6.me] from your phone, what does it say?

        • (Score: 1) by Runaway1956 on Wednesday July 10, @03:38AM (2 children)

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday July 10, @03:38AM (#1363611) Journal

          I am connecting with an IPv4 address . . . reading finer text . . .
          with ip6only.me I get 'site can't be reached'.
          whatismyv6.com gives me the same IPv4 address.

          Oh, wait. Let me turn off WIFI and try again. Derpa derpa!

          I'm getting no reception tonight. I only get poor reception here at best, tonight nothing. I'll drive out to the highway in the morning to try again.

          --
          We've finally beat Medicare! - Houseplant in Chief
        • (Score: 1) by Runaway1956 on Wednesday July 10, @04:17PM

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday July 10, @04:17PM (#1363659) Journal

          The only difference between WIFI and the cell network is, my IPv4 address changes. I still get nothing showing an IPv6 at all, whether I hit ipv6only or ipv6 stack or anything at all. Strictly v4 for me.

          --
          We've finally beat Medicare! - Houseplant in Chief
  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by canopic jug on Wednesday July 10, @11:23AM

    by canopic jug (3949) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday July 10, @11:23AM (#1363630) Journal

    The devices all support it, the ISP does not. It used to but stopped. We've been forcibly reverted to IPv4 since more than a few years ago.

    --
    Money is not free speech. Elections should not be auctions.
  • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10, @02:13PM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10, @02:13PM (#1363650)

    with IPv4 I know that I'm inside the local network, and any outside attacker needs to get through the router to attack me (or they need to have control of the outside places I connect to).

    with IPv6 the "whatismyip" result is exactly what "ifconfig" prints out, which makes me think IPv6 is less safe.

    or am I just showing my ignorance?

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by janrinok on Wednesday July 10, @04:14PM

      by janrinok (52) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday July 10, @04:14PM (#1363658) Journal

      Anyone trying to connect to a specific device still has to go through your router. How you configure your router is still up to you. My router allows me to block all incoming connections, all connections (in or out), or allow specific ports to access individual devices.

      Individual devices each have their own firewall. Even within my private network I can prevent some machines from accessing data from another.

      --
      I am not interested in knowing who people are or where they live. My interest starts and stops at our servers.
    • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10, @05:04PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10, @05:04PM (#1363666)

      with IPv6 the "whatismyip" result is exactly what "ifconfig" prints out, which makes me think IPv6 is less safe.

      You are right, but there are workarounds. Unfortunately they are often not enabled by default in operating systems.

      Every host in your network having and using a unique, fixed, globally-routable IPv6 address is most definitely very bad from a privacy perspective because it allows your systems to be reliably identified individually. The usual way IPv6 addresses are assigned has the local part derived from a MAC address which (usually) never changes so you can also use these addresses to reliably identify hosts that are moved around between different networks.

      With IPv6 you definitely want to be using the so-called privacy extensions [ietf.org]. In a nutshell this has every host generate new random addresses periodically and these should be the only ones used for outgoing connections. If this sounds a lot more complex than before, it is.

  • (Score: 3, Touché) by Freeman on Wednesday July 10, @08:38PM

    by Freeman (732) on Wednesday July 10, @08:38PM (#1363697) Journal

    IPv4 vs IPv6 as far as I can tell, there's not any difference to me, the user. Other than an IPv4 address being simple to enter and an IPv6 address being annoying to enter.

    --
    Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
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