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SK Hynix Ready to Ship 16 Gb DDR5 Dies, Has its Own 64 GB DDR5-4800 Modules

Accepted submission by takyon at 2020-10-06 13:54:22
Hardware

DDR5 is Coming: First 64GB DDR5-4800 Modules from SK Hynix [anandtech.com]

DDR5 is the next stage of platform memory for use in the majority of major compute platforms. The specification (as released in July 2020 [anandtech.com]) brings the main voltage down from 1.2 V to 1.1 V, increases the maximum silicon die density by a factor 4, doubles the maximum data rate, doubles the burst length, and doubles the number of bank groups. Simply put, the JEDEC DDR specifications allows for a 128 GB unbuffered module running at DDR5-6400. RDIMMs and LRDIMMs should be able to go much higher, power permitting.

[...] SK Hynix's announcement today is that they are ready to start shipping DDR5 ECC memory to module manufacturers – specifically 16 gigabit dies built on its 1Ynm process that support DDR5-4800 to DDR5-5600 at 1.1 volts. With the right packaging technology (such as 3D TSV), SK Hynix says that partners can build 256 GB LRDIMMs. Additional binning of the chips for better-than-JEDEC speeds will have to be done by the module manufacturers themselves. SK Hynix also appears to have its own modules, specifically 32GB and 64GB RDIMMs at DDR5-4800, and has previously promised to offer memory up to DDR5-8400 [anandtech.com].

[...] As part of the announcement, it was interesting to see Intel as one of the lead partners for these modules. Intel has committed to enabling DDR5 on its Sapphire Rapids Xeon processor platform [anandtech.com], due for initial launch in late 2021/2022. AMD was not mentioned with the announcement, and neither were any Arm partners.

SK Hynix quotes that DDR5 is expected to be 10% of the global market in 2021, increasing to 43% in 2024. The intersection point for consumer platforms is somewhat blurred at this point, as we're probably only half-way through (or less than half) of the DDR4 cycle. Traditionally we expect a cost interception between old and new technology when they are equal in market share, however the additional costs in voltage regulation that DDR5 requires is likely to drive up module costs – scaling from standard power delivery on JEDEC modules up to a beefier solution on the overclocked modules. It should however make motherboards cheaper in that regard.

Previously: DDR5 Standard to be Finalized by JEDEC in 2018 [soylentnews.org]
DDR5-4400 Test Chip Demonstrated [soylentnews.org]
Cadence and Micron Plan Production of 16 Gb DDR5 Chips in 2019 [soylentnews.org]
SK Hynix Announces Plans for DDR5-8400 Memory, and More [soylentnews.org]
JEDEC Releases DDR5 Memory Specification [soylentnews.org]


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