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posted by martyb on Monday August 22 2016, @10:09AM   Printer-friendly
from the Privatized-International-Space-Station-==-PISS? dept.

NASA may sell/lease parts of the International Space Station in the next decade:

NASA has signalled its intention to offload the International Space Station (ISS) some time in the 2020s. News of the sale appeared in the video below, at about the 14:15 mark [YouTube] when Bill Hill, NASA's deputy associate administrator for exploration systems development, ponders the ISS' role in future missions.

"Ultimately our desire is to hand the space station to either a commercial entity or some other commercial capability so that research can continue in low-Earth orbit. We figure that will be around the mid-20s."

Hill and the other speakers in the video explain how NASA is preparing for a crewed Mars mission and outline how the agency is now well and truly in the market for ideas about how to get it done.

Also at SpaceFlight Insider and TechCrunch.

Related:
Russia to Build New Space Station with NASA after ISS
Russia Investigates Downsizing Space Station Crew From Three to Two


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  • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 23 2016, @10:35AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 23 2016, @10:35AM (#392058)

    Was there a point to your post?

    Yes, there was a point in my post. Let me reiterate so there is no misunderstanding:

    It is geometrically impossible for an object at said altitude to reflect sunlight at that time and location. As I said, once past ~22 degrees of the separator, it is Game Over. You are most welcome to not take my claim at face value, and to do the math yourself. Even better, figure out when the 'ISS' is presumably in the shadow, and ambush it. Do not just go for 'published best viewing times': you know the inclination, you know the speed, so do these math yourself as well, predict its location and see what gives.

    I did too and my observation was consistent with what the ISS is supposed to be.

    Right. So when the Pharaoh commands the Sun to be eclipsed, and you see the eclipse, this is consistent with the Pharaoh having super-powers.

    PS>" Due to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, anonymous comment posting has temporarily been disabled. "

    Freedom of Speech, huh? I would expect this from Facebook or Slashdot, but not Soylentnews.

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  • (Score: 1) by khallow on Tuesday August 23 2016, @11:53PM

    by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 23 2016, @11:53PM (#392375) Journal

    It is geometrically impossible for an object at said altitude to reflect sunlight at that time and location. As I said, once past ~22 degrees of the separator, it is Game Over. You are most welcome to not take my claim at face value, and to do the math yourself. Even better, figure out when the 'ISS' is presumably in the shadow, and ambush it. Do not just go for 'published best viewing times': you know the inclination, you know the speed, so do these math yourself as well, predict its location and see what gives.

    The obvious rebuttal is that you did the math or observation wrong and your result is not reproducible. I'll point out that I've been outside at night a lot over the years with the ISS wizzing by. It's quite visible. I've only seen it when it's in sunlight (eg, right after sunset, for example) not at times when it would be in Earth's shadow. So my observation is just as valid as yours is.

    Let's point out some really obvious stuff here. First, 400 miles is just not that far away. You can image the ISS in a small telescope. If there's something other than the ISS there, then it'll look different. Second, the model of the ISS as a passive object that reflects sunlight will have a predictable spectrum. Again, you can observe that spectrum through a small telescope with attached spectrograph. I think if you sincerely do these observations and choose to accept the result, you'll have no reason to continue with this.

    PS>" Due to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, anonymous comment posting has temporarily been disabled. "

    Freedom of Speech, huh? I would expect this from Facebook or Slashdot, but not Soylentnews.

    You have to be responsible too. Sounds like you posted an enormous amount of bullshit. It's not your personal echo chamber. Other people use this site too.