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posted by on Sunday February 12 2017, @10:09AM   Printer-friendly
from the rebellion dept.

The Guardian reports that the U.S. Army sent a letter, dated 7 February, to member of Congress Raúl Grijalva, saying it would grant a permit for the construction of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline. Work could resume as early as 8 February.

"I have determined that there is no cause for completing any additional environmental analysis," wrote Douglas W Lamon, the senior official performing the duties of assistant secretary of the army, wrote in a notice to the federal register.

More recent news in Standing Rock from Feb 9:

The restarting of the drilling operation, which a pipeline spokeswoman confirmed on Thursday morning, began soon after the US government gave the oil corporation the green light to proceed on Wednesday. The controversial pipeline could be transporting crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois within three months.

At the Standing Rock camps in Cannon Ball – where activists have been stationed since last spring to fight the project – indigenous and environmental organizers vowed to stay put and continue opposing the pipeline.

[Continues...]

And from Feb 11:

Army veterans from across the country have arrived in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, or are currently en route after the news that Donald Trump's administration has allowed the oil corporation to finish drilling across the Missouri river.

The growing group of military veterans could make it harder for police and government officials to try to remove hundreds of activists who remain camped near the construction site and, some hope, could limit use of excessive force by law enforcement during demonstrations.

"We are prepared to put our bodies between Native elders and a privatized military force," said Elizabeth Williams, a 34-year-old air force veteran, who arrived at Standing Rock with a group of vets late on Friday. "We've stood in the face of fire before. We feel a responsibility to use the skills we have."

Previous stories:

Army Corp [sic] of Engineers Now Accepting Public Comment on the Dakota Access Pipeline
Army Corps of Engineers Blocks the Dakota Access Pipeline and many others in the archives.


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  • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Sunday February 12 2017, @12:06PM

    by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Sunday February 12 2017, @12:06PM (#466107) Journal

    ... what the hell has US army to do with the pipeline approval?

    --
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
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  • (Score: 4, Informative) by DavePolaschek on Sunday February 12 2017, @12:19PM

    by DavePolaschek (6129) on Sunday February 12 2017, @12:19PM (#466111) Homepage Journal

    The US Army Corps of Engineers, along with the Bureau of Reclamation, control the dams and waterways of the country. The Bureau controls those that are used for irrigation, and the Corps controls those that are used for flood control (such as the dam that forms Lake Oahe, which flooded the best Lakota land in North Dakota, how's that for flood control?) and power generation.