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posted by on Monday April 17 2017, @04:01AM   Printer-friendly
from the security-through-no-one-getting-fired dept.

[UPDATED 2017-04-17] Ars Technica reports that Mysterious Microsoft patch killed 0days released by NSA-leaking Shadow Brokers — Microsoft fixed critical vulnerabilities in uncredited update released in March.:

Contrary to what Ars and the rest of the world reported Friday, none of the published exploits stolen from the National Security Agency work against currently supported Microsoft products. This is according to a Microsoft blog post published late Friday night.

That's because the critical vulnerabilities for four exploits previously believed to be zerodays were patched in March, exactly one month before a group called Shadow Brokers published Friday's latest installment of weapons-grade attacks. Those updates—which Microsoft indexes as MS17-010, CVE-2017-0146, and CVE-2017-0147—make no mention of the person or group who reported the vulnerabilities to Microsoft. The lack of credit isn't unprecedented, but it's uncommon, and it's generating speculation that the reporters were tied to the NSA. In a vaguely worded statement issued Friday, Microsoft seemed to say it had had no contact with NSA officials concerning any of the exploits contained in Friday's leak.

Original story follows:

The "Shadow Brokers" released files that purport to expose vulnerabilities in Windows and especially in Windows Server.

Numerous Windows hacking tools are also among the new batch of files the Shadow Brokers dumped Friday. In recent months, the mysterious group has been releasing hacking tools allegedly taken from the NSA, and security researchers say they actually work.

According to PCWorld, but there are plenty of other venues reporting on this.

The group behind the leak, the Shadow Brokers, didn't clearly explain why they dumped the files. But in addition to the documents, the hackers also released what appears to be an arsenal of Windows-based hacking tools -- some of which target previously unknown vulnerabilities.
"This isn't a data dump, this is a damn Microsoft apocalypse," tweeted a security researcher who goes by the name Hacker Fantastic.

Leaked NSA Malware Threatens Windows Users Around the World from the Intercept.

Ars Technica

El Reg And why are they "el Reg" They are Brexit, not Spanish?

And Network World, with a very nice picture of the Puzzle Palace.

I have always wondered what it would take. Maybe if Microsoft forcibly dragged a user off of it's platform. After this, however, that may not be necessary.


Original Submission

 
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  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by edIII on Monday April 17 2017, @04:59AM (1 child)

    by edIII (791) on Monday April 17 2017, @04:59AM (#495118)

    Windows Servers have *always* been at risk. Always. Their locks are as good as the ignorance of their users about how their systems really work.

    I had a small business utterly terrified when their previous sysadmin when insane and locked them out before being fired. Owner was beside themselves thinking it would be impossible to get back in and their business was ruined. They were even more frightened when I unlocked it in less than 5 minutes and said I would send him the bill before heading off to dinner :) (SAM is so secure /s)

    My lessons came early on when I connected up a Windows NT server to the Internet and then watched how easily people could get into it, and just why a firewall was absolutely required. This was just about 20 years ago. Today a server could be owned before you're finished provisioning it if you don't have it protected.

    "Windows Servers At Risk"

    Bwahahahahahahahhhahahah *wipes away tears*, you don't say!

    --
    Technically, lunchtime is at any moment. It's just a wave function.
    Starting Score:    1  point
    Moderation   +4  
       Interesting=3, Informative=1, Total=4
    Extra 'Interesting' Modifier   0  
    Karma-Bonus Modifier   +1  

    Total Score:   5  
  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by epitaxial on Monday April 17 2017, @12:54PM

    by epitaxial (3165) on Monday April 17 2017, @12:54PM (#495223)

    What? You had physical access to the machine. Your statement applies to any OS. Let's not forget that like UNIX, Linux used to ship with tons of inetd services running. Finally OpenBSD killed that trend and Linux followed.