Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

SoylentNews is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop. Only 17 submissions in the queue.
posted by martyb on Monday November 06 2017, @02:24PM   Printer-friendly
from the "tomorrow"-give-or-take-nine-months dept.

Richard Paulson, President of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, has said that transgender women could give birth as soon as "tomorrow" using donated wombs:

Those born with male assigned sex organs cannot conceive children biologically; however, this may soon change, at least according to one fertility expert. Transgender women—those who were assigned male at birth—could give birth as early as "tomorrow," Richard Paulson, an obstetrician-gynecologist and the president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said, according to The Telegraph. Thanks to advances in transgender medicine, donated wombs may be able to help transgender women conceive on their own, Paulson said during the society's annual conference in San Antonio, Texas.

Since at least 1999, transgender men have successfully given birth to healthy children, The Washington Post [archive] reports. More recently, Trystan Reese, a transgender man and his partner Biff Chaplow, gave birth to a healthy child last August. Despite their successes, the process is much more complex for transgender women. Primarily because a man's pelvis is a different shape than a woman's, making the birth much more complicated. Still, Paulson insists that it's possible, but notes the birth must be conducted via cesarean section.

"There would be additional challenges, but I don't see any obvious problem that would preclude it," Paulson said. "I personally suspect there are going to be trans women who are going to want to have a uterus and will likely get the transplant."

Only eight children have been born worldwide to mothers (born female) who had a uterine transplant, with the first such birth occurring in 2014. As we have reported, the first attempted uterine transplant in the U.S. failed last year.

Here's a 2016 article on the topic at Scientific American, which notes that surrogacy (which can have its own problems) is illegal in some countries. The article raises the question of unnecessary risks to the patient, as well as unknown risks posed to the fetus by a "potentially unstable biological environment" modulated by hormone treatments.

Not mentioned: the prospect of creating an artificial embryo using the DNA of two biological men, which is expected to be possible imminently (predicted by researchers two years ago to be available in 2017). Since men have both an X and Y sex chromosome, they should be able to have either a son or a daughter using such a technique.

If an artificial womb is developed in the future and it has a lesser chance of causing complications than a traditional pregnancy, would it be unethical for a woman to conceive a child naturally? Fetal lambs have been grown for up to four weeks in an artificial womb, so we may get an answer in the coming decades.

Also at the Sacremento Bee.


Original Submission

 
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Monday November 06 2017, @03:50PM (4 children)

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday November 06 2017, @03:50PM (#593114) Journal

    I read a short story, many years ago, in which the author asked that very question. Sorry, don't remember the author's name - I think it was in one of those old pulp magazines.

    Basically, men and women chose to live apart, and create their own societies. Both societies eventually grew so decadent that they couldn't be bothered to keep the machinery running. The eggs and sperms deteriorated over time, because it was all artifically created. When the supply of people in both societies began to run low, they sent emissaries to each other. With a lot of research, they figured out how us old-timers did it. Of course, no one has any practice or anything - they end up with two bumbling awkward know-nothings in a room trying to figure out how to get it on. Somehow, he hurts her, she screams and runs away, and everyone decides that mankind will just have to die off.

    The story was much better when the author told it. Wish I could remember who it was .

    Starting Score:    1  point
    Karma-Bonus Modifier   +1  

    Total Score:   2  
  • (Score: 2) by takyon on Monday November 06 2017, @03:56PM

    by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Monday November 06 2017, @03:56PM (#593120) Journal

    The eggs and sperms deteriorated over time, because it was all artifically created.

    This trope is used a lot in sci-fi. It doesn't make a lot of sense and will be made moot by synthetic DNA that can be edited down to the base pair, created from scratch, and then replicated using traditional methods like polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There's no deterioration beyond what we normally experience already, maybe less so if you consider that it is basically a form of eugenics (screening or editing out certain genetic disorders at a minimum).

    --
    [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
  • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 06 2017, @06:51PM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 06 2017, @06:51PM (#593238)

    I read a short story, many years ago, in which the author asked that very question. Sorry, don't remember the author's name - I think it was in one of those old pulp magazines.

    Ha! Runaway1956, the runaway that no one wants to adopt, is once again claiming to be able to read? And of course, the details are sketchy. Citation needed, Runaway, or the reading didn't happen!

    • (Score: 1, Offtopic) by Runaway1956 on Monday November 06 2017, @07:11PM (1 child)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday November 06 2017, @07:11PM (#593256) Journal

      Why bother to post as AC, when you are so transparent? And, once again, I don't want to be associated with you. You only ever wanted to adopt me, hoping to get all of my money when I die.

      • (Score: 2) by JNCF on Monday November 06 2017, @08:48PM

        by JNCF (4317) on Monday November 06 2017, @08:48PM (#593296) Journal

        Okay, that AC did read like him. I still think you're probably seeing patterns in static sometimes.