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posted by Dopefish on Monday February 24 2014, @06:00AM   Printer-friendly
from the i-for-one-welcome-our-new-computer-overlords dept.

kef writes:

"By 2029, computers will be able to understand our language, learn from experience and outsmart even the most intelligent humans, according to Google's director of engineering Ray Kurzweil.

Kurzweil says:

Computers are on the threshold of reading and understanding the semantic content of a language, but not quite at human levels. But since they can read a million times more material than humans they can make up for that with quantity. So IBM's Watson is a pretty weak reader on each page, but it read the 200m pages of Wikipedia. And basically what I'm doing at Google is to try to go beyond what Watson could do. To do it at Google scale. Which is to say to have the computer read tens of billions of pages. Watson doesn't understand the implications of what it's reading. It's doing a sort of pattern matching. It doesn't understand that if John sold his red Volvo to Mary that involves a transaction or possession and ownership being transferred. It doesn't understand that kind of information and so we are going to actually encode that, really try to teach it to understand the meaning of what these documents are saying.

Skynet anyone?"

 
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  • (Score: 2, Funny) by ls671 on Monday February 24 2014, @07:31AM

    by ls671 (891) Subscriber Badge on Monday February 24 2014, @07:31AM (#5650) Homepage

    "The article talks about building a machine with real natural-language"

    What is important is the neural languages not the "natural-language" because it may vary depending on where you are from.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_neural_ne twork [wikipedia.org]

    I talked about that in a break in a meeting where representatives from a bunch a well known companies assisted and after I was done, somebody asked me: "What are you talking about? A urinal network?"

    That was really funny.

    --
    Everything I write is lies, read between the lines.
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  • (Score: 0, Redundant) by ls671 on Monday February 24 2014, @10:28AM

    by ls671 (891) Subscriber Badge on Monday February 24 2014, @10:28AM (#5719) Homepage

    OK, re-reading, It might be hard to spot. So, here it is again in bold:

    somebody asked me: "What are you talking about? A urinal network?"

    --
    Everything I write is lies, read between the lines.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @10:43AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @10:43AM (#5727)

    Actually I've heard that people talking when encountering each other at the toilet is an important factor in corporate communications (and one of the reasons why women have problems in men-dominated companies because they obviously cannot participate in that). So you might indeed speak about an urinal network.