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posted by Dopefish on Monday February 24 2014, @12:00PM   Printer-friendly
from the my-stomach-is-too-small-to-eat-all-that dept.

Covalent writes "Scientists suggest that the early universe could be better understood by considering its viscosity which, as it turns out, was similar to that of chocolate syrup. Researchers claim to be able to use this approach (along with as yet unavailable measurements) to determine precisely how inflation took place in the instants after the Big Bang.

Green cheese, the Milky Way... Now chocolate syrup. The universe is a complicated but delicious place!"

 
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  • (Score: 5, Funny) by nightsky30 on Monday February 24 2014, @12:24PM

    by nightsky30 (1818) on Monday February 24 2014, @12:24PM (#5756)

    Green cheese, the Milky Way... Now chocolate syrup. The universe is a complicated but delicious place!"

    Together?

    • (Score: 4, Funny) by mojo chan on Monday February 24 2014, @01:06PM

      by mojo chan (266) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:06PM (#5767)

      They seem to be saying that the matter in the early universe, from which everything else formed, was like chocolate syrup. Therefore we can conclude that green cheese, the Milky Way, the moon, the primordial stew, pea soup fog and anything else made of food was originally chocolate syrup. It seems to be the most fundamental part of the FSM's recipe for his creation, but to be fair he was very drunk when he concocted it.

      --
      const int one = 65536; (Silvermoon, Texture.cs)
      • (Score: 0, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @02:36PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @02:36PM (#5820)

        Well, it certainly explains the large amount of dark matter in the universe: Chocolate syrup is dark.

        • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Tuesday February 25 2014, @07:54AM

          by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday February 25 2014, @07:54AM (#6466) Journal

          Hmmm ... why is that one at -1, and the one over there [soylentnews.org] which basically makes the same joke (and was posted later) at +3?

          --
          The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
      • (Score: 1) by monster on Monday February 24 2014, @05:20PM

        by monster (1260) on Monday February 24 2014, @05:20PM (#5970) Journal

        Well, there are some really tasty recipes with chocolate in mexican cuisine. Just add the noodles, and presto! Tasty universe.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by dilbert on Monday February 24 2014, @01:42PM

      by dilbert (444) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:42PM (#5788)
      Not as delicious as spelunking: cave popcorn! cave BACON!!!

      Astronomers need to name something bacon related if they want to get peoples saliva flowing.

    • (Score: 3, Funny) by theluggage on Monday February 24 2014, @03:28PM

      by theluggage (1797) on Monday February 24 2014, @03:28PM (#5874)

      Cheese and chocolate syrup? It's official:

      The universe is pregnant!

  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Drake_Edgewater on Monday February 24 2014, @12:36PM

    by Drake_Edgewater (780) on Monday February 24 2014, @12:36PM (#5758) Journal

    Interesting! Computational simulations of fluid dynamics have been pushing towards models of turbulence. In principle, turbulent flows [wikipedia.org] arise when we have low viscosity (high Reynolds number [wikipedia.org]), which requires extremely expensive computers [wikipedia.org].

    Could this be a new field in which simulations of low Reynolds numbers (which requires lower computational efforts) can still be applied?

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by Covalent on Monday February 24 2014, @01:51PM

      by Covalent (43) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:51PM (#5797) Journal

      That's how I understood the article...essentially that turbulent flow in the early universe is the cause of the heterogeneous distribution of mass in the universe today. Further, that the specific distribution of mass that we see today, along with these fluid dynamics computations, could be used to determine exactly how (and what type) of inflation took place in the early universe.

      --
      You can't rationally argue somebody out of a position they didn't rationally get into.
      • (Score: 3, Funny) by c0lo on Monday February 24 2014, @02:45PM

        by c0lo (156) on Monday February 24 2014, @02:45PM (#5827) Journal

        Further, that the specific distribution of mass that we see today, along with these fluid dynamics computations, could be used to determine exactly how (and what type) of inflation took place in the early universe.

        Not to mention that, if the modelled chocolate syrup is one with a high enough cocoa content, one might be able to tell what happened with the elusive dark matter.

        (grin)

        --
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
  • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @12:42PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @12:42PM (#5761)

    Green cheese? Was it really necessary to add that "mainstream media" style joke to the summary? That's like something an anchor would open a story with. I thought this was the anti-Slashdot. Can we please keep the science clean?

    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by nightsky30 on Monday February 24 2014, @01:08PM

      by nightsky30 (1818) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:08PM (#5770)

      I don't disagree with you, but if you truly care how this site develops perhaps you would care to register an account? :)

      • (Score: -1) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @01:20PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @01:20PM (#5777)

        This. Mod parent up!

        • (Score: 2) by drgibbon on Monday February 24 2014, @01:24PM

          by drgibbon (74) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:24PM (#5780) Journal

          that.

          --
          Certified Soylent Fresh!
        • (Score: 1) by dotdotdot on Monday February 24 2014, @01:50PM

          by dotdotdot (858) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:50PM (#5795)

          Initiate "What is irony?" debate in 3 ... 2 ... 1 ...

          • (Score: 3, Funny) by Thexalon on Monday February 24 2014, @02:45PM

            by Thexalon (636) on Monday February 24 2014, @02:45PM (#5825)

            I'll start: Steel is pretty irony.

            --
            The only thing that stops a bad guy with a compiler is a good guy with a compiler.
          • (Score: 2) by VLM on Monday February 24 2014, @05:42PM

            by VLM (445) Subscriber Badge on Monday February 24 2014, @05:42PM (#5983)

            The irony is we're debating irony in an astrophysics / cosmology article.

            These are the kind of scientists that think its funny to talk about the "Metallicity" of something maybe showing neon spectrum lines and no actual metal spectrum lines at all. Given that, I don't think you'll get a straight answer for irony outta those types.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallicity [wikipedia.org]

            • (Score: 2, Funny) by Istaera on Monday February 24 2014, @10:17PM

              by Istaera (113) on Monday February 24 2014, @10:17PM (#6242)

              What? But Neon must be a metal, it's neither Hydrogen nor Helium!

              --
              I believe there's somebody out there watching us. Unfortunately, it's the government.
    • (Score: 1) by khakipuce on Monday February 24 2014, @01:27PM

      by khakipuce (233) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:27PM (#5782)

      The "scientists" started it with something as daft as saying the early universe was like chocolate syrup. Headline grabbing nonsense.

      Also up-vote the guy who suggested that you get an account if you care about the quality of this site

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by Covalent on Monday February 24 2014, @02:03PM

      by Covalent (43) on Monday February 24 2014, @02:03PM (#5805) Journal
      I don't usually reply to the ACs, but it's SN now, so maybe it's time for a new paradigm.

      1. The authors of the article compared the early universe's viscosity to that of chocolate syrup for a reason: The units of that viscosity (Pascal*seconds) are not exactly widely known and understood. I'm a chemistry professor and I had to look them up...so lighten up with the food references. Which brings me to point 2:

      2. I included the green cheese and Milky Way as a bit of a joke (not saying it was funny, but still). We compare complex scientific concepts and processes to simple ones (see the numerous car analogies) to make things more comprehensible to everyone. I use the whole "moon of green cheese" thing when I teach about density. The moon cannot be made of green cheese: simple math will show how dense the moon is, and how dense cheeses are, and prove that the one cannot be made of the other.

      3. Why not rail against the "my-stomach-is-too-small-to-eat-all-that dept." joke in the header? I mean, seriously, how would it even make sense to eat the whole early universe? </sarcasm>
      --
      You can't rationally argue somebody out of a position they didn't rationally get into.
      • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @02:43PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @02:43PM (#5824)

        (Different AC here)

        I don't usually reply to the ACs, but it's SN now, so maybe it's time for a new paradigm.

        Actually, the paradigm was already wrong on /. — you should post whenever you think your answer might benefit other readers, even if you suspect the OP might never read it.

        And BTW, I also have an account on SN, but I use it only from my own computer.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 25 2014, @05:39AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 25 2014, @05:39AM (#6416)

    "Chocolate Rain" Original Song by Tay Zonday
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwTZ2xpQwpA [youtube.com]

    Pinkie Pie - Chocolate Rain
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGck7U-UK2c [youtube.com]

    Pinkie Pie Drinks Chocolate Rain While I Play Fitting Music
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Do4-jfVMTm8 [youtube.com]

    [Hope you don't have to use the CAPTCHA here like at the other site.... :P]