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posted by Dopefish on Monday February 24 2014, @12:00PM   Printer-friendly
from the my-stomach-is-too-small-to-eat-all-that dept.

Covalent writes "Scientists suggest that the early universe could be better understood by considering its viscosity which, as it turns out, was similar to that of chocolate syrup. Researchers claim to be able to use this approach (along with as yet unavailable measurements) to determine precisely how inflation took place in the instants after the Big Bang.

Green cheese, the Milky Way... Now chocolate syrup. The universe is a complicated but delicious place!"

 
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  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Drake_Edgewater on Monday February 24 2014, @12:36PM

    by Drake_Edgewater (780) on Monday February 24 2014, @12:36PM (#5758) Journal

    Interesting! Computational simulations of fluid dynamics have been pushing towards models of turbulence. In principle, turbulent flows [wikipedia.org] arise when we have low viscosity (high Reynolds number [wikipedia.org]), which requires extremely expensive computers [wikipedia.org].

    Could this be a new field in which simulations of low Reynolds numbers (which requires lower computational efforts) can still be applied?

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  • (Score: 5, Informative) by Covalent on Monday February 24 2014, @01:51PM

    by Covalent (43) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:51PM (#5797) Journal

    That's how I understood the article...essentially that turbulent flow in the early universe is the cause of the heterogeneous distribution of mass in the universe today. Further, that the specific distribution of mass that we see today, along with these fluid dynamics computations, could be used to determine exactly how (and what type) of inflation took place in the early universe.

    --
    You can't rationally argue somebody out of a position they didn't rationally get into.
    • (Score: 3, Funny) by c0lo on Monday February 24 2014, @02:45PM

      by c0lo (156) on Monday February 24 2014, @02:45PM (#5827) Journal

      Further, that the specific distribution of mass that we see today, along with these fluid dynamics computations, could be used to determine exactly how (and what type) of inflation took place in the early universe.

      Not to mention that, if the modelled chocolate syrup is one with a high enough cocoa content, one might be able to tell what happened with the elusive dark matter.

      (grin)

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0