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posted by martyb on Thursday June 14 2018, @03:08AM   Printer-friendly
from the can-you-picture-that? dept.

Intel's First (Modern) Discrete GPU Set For 2020

In a very short tweet posted to their Twitter feed yesterday, Intel revealed/confirmed the launch date for their first discrete GPU developed under the company's new dGPU initiative. The otherwise unnamed high-end GPU will be launching in 2020, a short two to two-and-a-half years from now.

[...] This new GPU would be the first GPU to come out of Intel's revitalized GPU efforts, which kicked into high gear at the end of 2017 with the hiring of former AMD and Apple GPU boss Raja Koduri. Intel of course is in the midst of watching sometimes-ally and sometimes-rival NVIDIA grow at a nearly absurd pace thanks to the machine learning boom, so Intel's third shot at dGPUs is ultimately an effort to establish themselves in a market for accelerators that is no longer niche but is increasingly splitting off customers who previously would have relied entirely on Intel CPUs.

[...] Intel isn't saying anything else about the GPU at this time. Though we do know from Intel's statements when they hired Koduri that they're starting with high-end GPUs, a fitting choice given the accelerator market Intel is going after. This GPU is almost certainly aimed at compute users first and foremost – especially if Intel adopts a bleeding edge-like strategy that AMD and NVIDIA have started to favor – but Intel's dGPU efforts are not entirely focused on professionals. Intel has also confirmed that they want to go after the gaming market as well, though what that would entail – and when – is another question entirely.

Previously: AMD's Radeon Technologies Group Boss Raja Koduri Leaves, Confirmed to be Defecting to Intel
Intel Planning a Return to the Discrete GPU Market, Nvidia CEO Responds


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @03:54AM (5 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @03:54AM (#692686)

    The problem with nvidia is they hobble the features of their gpus to try to upsell you, and make you install telemetry to use their drivers, and you have to install (including giving them an email address and filling out a survey) their proprietary cuda platform and cudnn libraries to use it.

    Something tells me intel will choose the same route, but if they instead strategically partner with amd to get open versions of all that it would be great.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @04:12AM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @04:12AM (#692693)
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @04:29AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @04:29AM (#692699)

        Thanks, what about the other aspects?

        • (Score: 2) by takyon on Thursday June 14 2018, @04:50AM

          by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Thursday June 14 2018, @04:50AM (#692702) Journal

          Who knows? We can't put it past Intel to include telemetry. It seems to be targeted for businesses/universities and machine learning first rather than gaming. Maybe they will use it as the successor to the cancelled Xeon Phi "Knights Hill" chip [wikipedia.org].

          I think we can be cautiously optimistic about Intel's discrete GPU. Nvidia just abuses their #1 position, and Intel can't do that starting at #3 (...in discrete GPUs. Intel leads in integrated GPUs, but not if you include ARM smartphone SoCs with Adreno/PowerVR/Mali/etc. graphics).

          One test: Will they support G-Sync [wikipedia.org] or FreeSync [wikipedia.org]? Hopefully, details like that will start to get leaked/released in 2019.

          --
          [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 2) by Taibhsear on Thursday June 14 2018, @03:32PM (1 child)

      by Taibhsear (1464) on Thursday June 14 2018, @03:32PM (#692961)

      In windows, just uncheck the Geforce Experience software when you install the driver package. No login bs required, still get all the drivers. (Not going to lie, I still yelled at the screen a lot when they first implemented that login bullshit though.) In linux they haven't required logins for anything yet that I've encountered.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @03:51PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @03:51PM (#692970)

        For the log-in I was referring to: https://developer.nvidia.com/cudnn [nvidia.com]

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @06:59AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 14 2018, @06:59AM (#692740)

    so it's december 2020? for christmas?

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