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posted by LaminatorX on Wednesday July 02 2014, @12:34PM   Printer-friendly
from the Which-Door-would-He-Suggest? dept.

Computational nanoscientist Surendra Jain has written solvers for Sudoku, Killer Sudoku, Samurai Sudoku, Calcudoku, Kakuro and many other logic problems.

All are elegantly coded and very fast: for example, the "World's Hardest Sudoku" is solved in 0.05 seconds (on a 5 year old PC) and his Knight's Tour solver is an order of magnitude faster than this one.

The page (called "Classical Geek") has all source (in Fortran 90, one of the most popular languages in high-performance computing) as well as compilation and running instructions.

 
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  • (Score: 2) by VLM on Wednesday July 02 2014, @02:39PM

    by VLM (445) on Wednesday July 02 2014, @02:39PM (#63073)

    Source in a pkzip file? Haven't seen that since msdos times in the early 90s. Put it up on github.

    One thing that I see people hanging up on is there's elegance as a programmer without knowing the .biz logic and theres elegance as a puzzle solver as in having great algos and rarely are the two identical. So not willing to look at the source I wonder which way these go. Given the comments by programmers making fun of the code, I think we can assume its elegance as in puzzle solver / algo elegance not elegance as in pretty looking stylish source code.

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 02 2014, @11:51PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 02 2014, @11:51PM (#63332)

    I've gotten distros from github in .ZIP files

    Windows supports zipfile decompression making them look like folders and
    files within folders when you click on them.

    To bad Phil Katz isn't around to see his file format still in use to this day.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Katz [wikipedia.org]

    His legal problems with System Enhancement Associates notwithstanging....