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posted by chromas on Friday February 15 2019, @03:10PM   Printer-friendly
from the squash-the-beef dept.

https://newfoodeconomy.org/bpi-pink-slime-ground-beef-usda-reclassifed/

Beef Products Inc. (BPI), the South Dakota-based meat processing company at the center of 2012’s “pink slime” controversy, just won a long-sought semantic victory. For years, the company has argued that its signature product is safe, wholesome, and not unlike everyday burger meat. Now, BPI has enlisted a powerful ally in its effort to recoup its image and reclassify its product: the federal government.

After a months-long evaluation, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) determined in December that BPI’s signature product—the offering famously called “pink slime” in an ABC News exposé that got the network in a lot of trouble—can be labeled “ground beef.” Legally speaking, it’s now no different from ordinary hamburger, and could even be sold directly to the public.


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  • (Score: 2) by The Mighty Buzzard on Friday February 15 2019, @09:24PM (4 children)

    I know it sounds nasty because of the word "slime" but pink slime is ounce for ounce the most nutritious substance in a beef processing plant by a long shot. There's nothing nefarious about it, it's just what leaks out of cut muscle and fat cells over a lot of meat processing. I'm not saying you should or shouldn't want them adding it back to ground beef, I'm just saying you should know what you're talking about and use this information and your intellect rather than your gag reflex at the term "slime" to decide.

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  • (Score: 4, Informative) by aristarchus on Friday February 15 2019, @11:23PM (1 child)

    by aristarchus (2645) on Friday February 15 2019, @11:23PM (#801822) Journal

    It's not the slime, Buzzard, it's the disinfectants, the ammonia, the sodium hypochlorite, and so on, that makes it disgusting. And what would we expect from a carrion-feeder, other than a defense of carrion? Let me guess, as a buzzard, you have no gag reflex, at all?

    • (Score: 2) by The Mighty Buzzard on Sunday February 17 2019, @01:56AM

      No, I just know plenty of west Texas cattle folks and know the truth of the matter. Cleaning substances are not left on anything that meat will be touching except in barely detectable trace amounts that are utterly harmless. They do that much for anything even cattle feed is being made in.

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      My rights don't end where your fear begins.
  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Ethanol-fueled on Friday February 15 2019, @11:28PM (1 child)

    by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Friday February 15 2019, @11:28PM (#801826) Homepage

    It's not the "slime" part that gets me, it's the ammonia.

    I'm not a meat-slaughtering expert so perhaps I could be enlightened, but if there's any reason why that shit needs to be treated with a harsh chemical after the slaughter to kill bacteria while your other cuts of meat don't, then sorry, I'm a pussy and will avoid it when I can. I can tolerate a burger patty dropped on a somewhat recently-mopped floor and then served to me at the place it's being cooked (yes, they do this, and they do it a lot) but pink slime brings to mind ball-scratching illegal immigrants with typhoid snow-shoveling the rancid trimmings that have sat at room-temperature on a 2000 square-foot floor for 8-12 hours into being processed as pink slime.

    • (Score: 2) by The Mighty Buzzard on Sunday February 17 2019, @02:01AM

      That's gas not liquid. It takes care of any bacteria that may have snuck in over hours of machine use while not mixing with the product in any noticeable quantities. And ammonia levels below your ability to notice (it's not by any means a subtle chemical) are also not harmful.

      --
      My rights don't end where your fear begins.