Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by janrinok on Friday March 01, @12:32AM   Printer-friendly
from the Browser-freedom dept.

There's a new browser in town: Nyxt. It is free software. It is intended to be modified by the user, perhaps even rewritten. From https://nyxt.atlas.engineer/:

Built-in programmability.

Use the built-in REPL to program Nyxt. Run short scripts, and try out new workflows. Everything in Nyxt is fully extensible and modifiable.

It is written in Common Lisp.

Is this the browser we programmers have been waiting for? The one we can modify to our wildest dreams?

[Ed's comment: The linked source is obviously intended to show a potential user how it will work, and in this role it does a reasonable job. But there is not a great deal to explain why they think it is a game changer, or why it will appeal to many users. If it is necessary to use Lisp to extend the browser then perhaps it will not have the impact that they seem to believe it will have. But what do you think? Will it gain a foothold, or simply fade away to be forgotten except perhaps for a few enthusiasts?]


Original Submission

 
This discussion was created by janrinok (52) for logged-in users only, but now has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 4, Funny) by DannyB on Friday March 01, @03:27PM (8 children)

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 01, @03:27PM (#1346971) Journal

    Will the EMACS phenomena happen to this browser?

    Every other application that you might need was written in to Emacs. Email client. FTP. Telnet. You name it. It almost as if Emacs could be the operating system. (maybe it should be?)

    Why did this happen? Because emacs users could not figure out how to exit the editor and ended up having to rewrite all their other apps as emacs extensions.

    What if the browser could be the "OS".

    --
    When trying to solve a problem don't ask who suffers from the problem, ask who profits from the problem.
    Starting Score:    1  point
    Moderation   +2  
       Funny=2, Total=2
    Extra 'Funny' Modifier   0  
    Karma-Bonus Modifier   +1  

    Total Score:   4  
  • (Score: 4, Funny) by sgleysti on Friday March 01, @06:10PM (1 child)

    by sgleysti (56) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 01, @06:10PM (#1346991)

    Emacs is a good operating system, but it could use a better text editor.

    What if the browser could be the "OS".

    Sadly, this is happening for a lot of things. It turns out, what we really needed in software was to add more layers to our software stack, write everything in poorly designed interpreted languages, and host everything on remote servers. Welcome to the cloud.

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Friday March 01, @09:07PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 01, @09:07PM (#1347012) Journal

      Emacs is a good operating system, but it could use a better text editor.

      Emacs is sufficiently flexible to use it as a good OS and make it emulate VIM.

      Problem solved. Everyone happy.

      --
      When trying to solve a problem don't ask who suffers from the problem, ask who profits from the problem.
  • (Score: 3, Funny) by hendrikboom on Friday March 01, @06:17PM (1 child)

    by hendrikboom (1125) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 01, @06:17PM (#1346993) Homepage Journal

    Same happened to vim.
    It's just a question of which editor you got locked into first, and are still stuck inside.

    • (Score: 3, Funny) by DannyB on Friday March 01, @09:11PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 01, @09:11PM (#1347013) Journal

      If you are able to start another instance of the shell from within the editor, then all is good happiness, rainbows and unicorns.

      Assuming you know how to exit from your shell, you will be back in the editor. If you can't exit your shell, you can always start another instance of the editor.

      I won't even mention tmux (or screen / scream). (oops, I said I wouldn't mention it)

      --
      When trying to solve a problem don't ask who suffers from the problem, ask who profits from the problem.
  • (Score: 4, Funny) by Reziac on Saturday March 02, @03:01AM (3 children)

    by Reziac (2489) on Saturday March 02, @03:01AM (#1347039) Homepage

    "Why did this happen? Because emacs users could not figure out how to exit the editor"

    Where is the mod for "+1, Literal Truth" ??

    I only tried emacs once. I could not figure out how to exit the durn thing and wound up doing a hard reset to get loose from it. I am quite convinced emacs was built from bear traps.

    --
    And there is no Alkibiades to come back and save us from ourselves.
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by RS3 on Saturday March 02, @06:12AM (1 child)

      by RS3 (6367) on Saturday March 02, @06:12AM (#1347050)

      It's been a long time since I tried EMACS, but IIRC I had to ALT-F2, login, kill -9 [EMACS process ID].
       

      • (Score: 3, Funny) by Reziac on Saturday March 02, @06:26AM

        by Reziac (2489) on Saturday March 02, @06:26AM (#1347051) Homepage

        I made the mistake of attempting it from within my first foray into linux.... babes in the woods... bears....

        --
        And there is no Alkibiades to come back and save us from ourselves.
    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Monday March 04, @06:37PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 04, @06:37PM (#1347314) Journal

      emacs was built from bear traps.

      It was so difficult I could not bare it.

      But then Macintosh Common Lisp (oh, about 1990 ish) had a GUI editor called FRED. (Fred Resembles Emacs Deliberately) Every key binding was programmable, of course in CL. But since it was a GUI, you could move the window around, pick File-->Save, and close it.

      Ooops, but I forgot to evaluate it first, so now I have to re-open that file . . .

      --
      When trying to solve a problem don't ask who suffers from the problem, ask who profits from the problem.