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posted by LaminatorX on Thursday March 20 2014, @12:00PM   Printer-friendly
from the who-wanted-that? dept.

Rashek writes:

"Alex Kibkalo, an ex-Microsoft employee was just arrested for stealing and leaking company secrets.

Having spent seven years working for Microsoft, Kibkalo is alleged to have leaked Windows 8 code to a French technology blogger in mid-2012, prior to the software's release. Kibkalo was apparently angry over a poor performance review."

 
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  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Thexalon on Thursday March 20 2014, @12:17PM

    by Thexalon (636) on Thursday March 20 2014, @12:17PM (#18853)

    Read 'em before you sign 'em. Know that violating one can cost you both a lot of money and quite possibly your career (because you've just shown that you are untrustworthy and vindictive).

    And never, ever, burn bridges on the way out the door of a company (which, if you're acting this way, you're on the way out). It's not that you expect to work directly for the people you're leaving behind, it's that those people know other people who you might want to work for, and so how you treat the company you're leaving has a big effect on your professional reputation.

    --
    Alcohol makes the world go round ... and round and round.
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  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Sir Garlon on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:12PM

    by Sir Garlon (1264) on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:12PM (#18867)

    And just generally, being a dick is bad. I know. I've been doing it for years. :-)

    --
    [Sir Garlon] is the marvellest knight that is now living, for he destroyeth many good knights, for he goeth invisible.
    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Ethanol-fueled on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:23PM

      by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:23PM (#18871) Homepage

      There's absolutely nothing wrong with fucking over a corporation that would just as soon fuck you in the end if it meant saving a few pennies.

      That being said, its amazing how ignorant some people who work in the tech world and should know better still manage to get caught doing stupid shit like this. Instead of providing code, the idiot could have posted something more juicy, like internally-posted poor adoption numbers, or show-stopping bugs, etc.

      Or, better yet, contacting customers anonymously and telling them everything they needed to know about their having been swindled all these years. Or contacting their ISO auditor and pointing him exactly where he needs to look.

      • (Score: 4, Interesting) by TK on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:56PM

        by TK (2760) on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:56PM (#18887)

        A thousand times this. Sending an anonymous (or otherwise) tip to the local ISO auditor, or better yet OSHA, EPA or any other fear-inducing acronym can put most companies in a world of inconvenient pain, while you get away squeaky clean, because everybody working there knows about those violations, even if they don't talk about them.

        --
        The fleas have smaller fleas, upon their backs to bite them, and those fleas have lesser fleas, and so ad infinitum
  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Grishnakh on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:19PM

    by Grishnakh (2831) on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:19PM (#18869)

    This is bullshit. What this guy did is not a crime, it's a tort. Why is it that when companies steal from you, they never go to jail, and you just have to sue them, but if you "steal" from them, you go to jail? It's bullshit.

    • (Score: 1, Redundant) by koreanbabykilla on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:57PM

      by koreanbabykilla (968) on Thursday March 20 2014, @01:57PM (#18888)

      This

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by MrGuy on Thursday March 20 2014, @04:33PM

      by MrGuy (1007) on Thursday March 20 2014, @04:33PM (#18939)

      If he'd taken a wad of cash out of a drawer from Microsoft and handed it to someone, it would be a tort (causing someone to suffer harm), but it would also be a crime (theft). It's not an either/or.

      You can argue "all intellectual property is theft!" if you like, but trade secrets and intellectual property laws exist, and some really do have criminal penalties.

      • (Score: 2) by Grishnakh on Thursday March 20 2014, @04:48PM

        by Grishnakh (2831) on Thursday March 20 2014, @04:48PM (#18945)

        My point is that corporations are allowed to steal with impunity. For instance, if you give a car dealership a deposit on a car, and then the deal falls through or you exercise your right to back out, they're under no obligation to return your deposit. You have to sue them for it (and good luck collecting on a judgment). How is that not theft? Why don't they go to jail for it?

        • (Score: 1) by emg on Thursday March 20 2014, @06:35PM

          by emg (3464) on Thursday March 20 2014, @06:35PM (#19008)

          "For instance, if you give a car dealership a deposit on a car, and then the deal falls through or you exercise your right to back out, they're under no obligation to return your deposit."

          Uh, that's kind of the point of a deposit, isn't it? You give them money so they don't sell the car to anyone else until you complete the purchase?

          What's the point if they'll just give the money back if you decide not to buy?

          • (Score: 2) by Grishnakh on Thursday March 20 2014, @07:07PM

            by Grishnakh (2831) on Thursday March 20 2014, @07:07PM (#19029)

            >What's the point if they'll just give the money back if you decide not to buy?

            Because that's part of the contract. Holy shit, you really think they can just keep your money? What if your financing falls through? What if there's something wrong with the car?

            • (Score: 1) by emg on Friday March 21 2014, @12:17AM

              by emg (3464) on Friday March 21 2014, @12:17AM (#19123)

              "Because that's part of the contract. Holy shit, you really think they can just keep your money? What if your financing falls through? What if there's something wrong with the car?"

              Well, yes. But if you get financing and the car is fine, you're going to buy it, so why would you complain that they keep the deposit if you then turn around and change your mind?

              • (Score: 2) by Grishnakh on Friday March 21 2014, @01:07PM

                by Grishnakh (2831) on Friday March 21 2014, @01:07PM (#19269)

                I'm not talking about that, and I really don't know what the law is in that case if you get to such a late stage. I'm talking about where you give them a down-payment, and then there's something wrong with the car upon inspection, or the financing falls through; you have every right to back out and get your money back.

  • (Score: 1) by crAckZ on Thursday March 20 2014, @02:24PM

    by crAckZ (3501) on Thursday March 20 2014, @02:24PM (#18899) Journal

    +1
    Great point. I know I wouldn't hire a program guilty of leaking code.