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posted by takyon on Monday August 03 2015, @05:41PM   Printer-friendly
from the powerful-controlled-computing dept.

In the name of national security, China is restricting export of certain drones and computers:

From August 15, manufacturers of certain powerful drones and computers will have to give technical details to the authorities to obtain a licence prior to export, Xinhua news agency says.

[...] In the first five months of 2015, China exported some 160,000 civilian drones, a jump of 70 per cent year-on-year, worth more than $120 million, the official China Daily newspaper reported in July.

[...] The tightening of regulations comes two weeks after an incident in disputed Kashmir in which the Pakistani army claimed to have shot down an Indian "spy drone", reportedly Chinese-made.

China is also likely tightening controls on exports of powerful computers as it looks to maintain its edge in the global supercomputer battle long dominated by US-Japanese rivalry.

Starting August 15th, drone and supercomputer manufacturers will have to present technical details to the authorities in order to get a license to export.

takyon: Intel Launches New Chips in China as US Bans Sales to Supercomputing Centers
U.S. Export Restrictions Lead to Chinese Homegrown Supercomputing Chips


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  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by c0lo on Monday August 03 2015, @07:26PM

    by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday August 03 2015, @07:26PM (#217521) Journal

    Advancement requires capital and countries that export more make more revenue and can use that revenue to invest back into more advancements.

    Can they now? Aren't you forgeting the "duty of tax minimisation" the corporation have to their shareholders?

    Just have a look on the major country beneficiaries of the USA technological progress: they are named Cayman Islands, Seychelles, Bermuda and all those tax havens that exists; their efficiency of revenue generation is infinite: invested nothing and gained something.

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 03 2015, @07:37PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 03 2015, @07:37PM (#217526)

    You seem to be changing the subject. We were discussing whether or not allowing exportation will help a country stay dominant. We weren't discussing companies that take advantage of tax code loopholes. That's something that governments need to address separately.

    A company that can't make a profit can't pay taxes. A company that can only make a little profit can only pay a little in taxes. A company that can make more in profits can pay more in taxes. Allowing exportation allows more profits and hence more taxes. Shortcomings in a government's tax code are a separate issue from that.

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by c0lo on Monday August 03 2015, @07:56PM

      by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday August 03 2015, @07:56PM (#217541) Journal

      You seem to be changing the subject.

      It may seem so to youy. We were discussing* the efficiency of various means available for a country to become/stay technologically dominant. And I pointed the fact that setting a base on private initiative to do it has it's own inneficiencies.

      A company that can't make a profit can't pay taxes. A company that can only make a little profit can only pay a little in taxes. A company that can make more in profits can pay more in taxes. Allowing exportation allows more profits and hence more taxes. Shortcomings in a government's tax code are a separate issue from that.

      And a state-owned company can have the entire profit directed to technological advance, because the "proprietor" wants technological dominance rather than money. My point: the "private initiative" is not necessarily the only engine for technological advance.
      (in fact, once private enterprise reaches dominance, it becomes a hindrance to techonological progress - it loses motivation in sustaining the cost of further developments because it eats from its profits. See the current ISP market in US).

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      * an offtopic line of discussion - currently, TFA is about China tightening the control of its drone export because they were used for military/spying purposes.

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      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 03 2015, @08:03PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 03 2015, @08:03PM (#217548)

        Free market capitalism implies competition. The problem with ISP's is that they lobby to restrict competition. Yes, this harms advancement. but, again, that's a separate issue and you are once again changing the subject. I am not advocating that private companies should receive special monopolies. They should be forced to compete like anyone else. In fact your example is another example of how government interference harms advancement.

        • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday August 03 2015, @10:09PM

          by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday August 03 2015, @10:09PM (#217620) Journal

          In fact your example is another example of how government interference harms advancement.

          And yet, it is exactly a common government that defines a country as a geopolitical entity.
          So, if you want the best for private initiative, don't speak about countries, much less "technological dominant countries".

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          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford