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posted by martyb on Monday July 06 2015, @08:57AM   Printer-friendly
from the getting-what-you-asked-for-may-not-be-getting-what-you-want dept.

The Greeks voted no to the European Union's terms, despite warnings from the EU that rejecting new austerity terms would set their country on a path out of the Eurozone. 62% voted "No" while 38% voted "Yes".


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  • (Score: 3, Funny) by FatPhil on Monday July 06 2015, @10:27AM

    Pay your debts, or the EU sells Greece to Turkey.

    That should get them moving.
    --
    I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
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  • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @11:02AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @11:02AM (#205555)

    That's funny, we can't sell Greece. But what if... Let's say Greece demands a 50% haircut. Instead of giving Greece a haircut on the debt, we sell the full debt to Turkey at a 50% discount. Then Turkey can try and get their money back from Greece, possibly with a nice profit. Do you think Turkey would let them off the hook?

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @11:27AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @11:27AM (#205564)

      What I think will happen is that this move will finally push Greece into the open arms of the Soviet bear, and any other state in danger of the same fate will begin to seriously consider their end of the EU deal. Incidentally, Germany and it's mercantile economy has the most to lose from fragmenting the EU.

      Nothing makes you public enemy #1 quite like being a vengeful debt slaver piece of trash.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @11:35AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @11:35AM (#205568)

        Please clarify: Is terrorist to vengeful debt slaver piece of trash a promotion or a demotion?

        • (Score: 5, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @12:03PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @12:03PM (#205576)

          It's an entirely different character class. Terrorists get lots of explosive weapon proficiencies and fear-based skills, while debt slavers are debuffing damage-over-time skills like "compound interest" and "protection racket". The later are totally OP because they get the "immunity: morals" at LV1 which is otherwise only available on the "suicide bomber" elite class, and that one is seriously gimped by the crappy respawn mechanics.

      • (Score: 2) by romlok on Monday July 06 2015, @01:24PM

        by romlok (1241) on Monday July 06 2015, @01:24PM (#205610)

        Interestingly, the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) have recently set up their own collective financial institution, to rival the US-centric IMF.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @01:28PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @01:28PM (#205612)

          That's great. Greece can stiff someone else for a change.

        • (Score: 2) by jmorris on Monday July 06 2015, @06:02PM

          by jmorris (4844) on Monday July 06 2015, @06:02PM (#205763)

          Which is a good thing. Regardless.

          Really only two ways it can play out:

          1. Considering the inclinations of the countries, we get yet another socialist inspired IMF clone and China and Russia (the others don't count) drain their resources trying to prop up client states again. We already know how that story ends, socialist economies just can't produce enough resources for that. China's mixed model works slightly better than the old Soviet model but it isn't enough. They are already having enough internal problems they can no longer mask them. So enemies expend themselves trying something stupid and everybody wins.

          2. They build something real based on hard money. China and Russia have been quietly stacking gold bricks like Ron Paul was giving them financial advice for years now. If they realize their real opportunity and build a new international banking system based on hard money then where is the downside of that? Ok, so we all have to learn Mandarin and Russian and those languages both kinda suck for hackers but in the bigger picture those are sorta minor downsides. Stranger things have happened... not often though.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @12:59PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @12:59PM (#205599)

    Is that for Greece, or for Greece to tell the 6,000+ tax evaders?

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @01:31PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06 2015, @01:31PM (#205614)

      If you think that having 6000 tax evaders in a country of a couple of million people is a problem, then you must have forgotten to take your meds.

      • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Monday July 06 2015, @08:53PM

        by maxwell demon (1608) on Monday July 06 2015, @08:53PM (#205835) Journal

        It doesn't matter how many tax evaders there are. What matters is how much money they hide.

        --
        The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07 2015, @02:08AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07 2015, @02:08AM (#205958)

        If you think that having 6000 tax evaders in a country of a couple of million people is a problem

        I matters a lot when they are the top 6,000 earners in the country. The rich in Greece treat their taxes the same way as the government treats its debts: pay 'em? you can't make us.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07 2015, @03:02PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07 2015, @03:02PM (#206133)

          you don't honestly think that's a uniquely greek problem do you?

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07 2015, @03:36PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07 2015, @03:36PM (#206144)

            First of all, if you've ever done business with Greeks, you know that there are vast differences regarding the view on tax compliance. Secondly, if your economy is otherwise healthy and you can absorb losses due to tax evasion, then it isn't an immediate problem. But if you go to other countries, some poorer than yourself, and ask for handouts, then your failure to actually tax your own people will not be ignored.

  • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Monday July 06 2015, @07:47PM

    by tangomargarine (667) on Monday July 06 2015, @07:47PM (#205808)

    Er...hasn't there been talk of Turkey joining the EU?

    --
    "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Monday July 06 2015, @09:15PM

      Yeah, and there's been talk of me emigrating to Canada or New Zealand. Coincidence? I think not! (Which is funny, as some might say that I live in one of the shithole countries that should never have been let into the EU itself, but they're ignoramuses as this plucky little country is already pulling its weight, and only contributing positively.)
      --
      I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
      • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Monday July 06 2015, @10:48PM

        by tangomargarine (667) on Monday July 06 2015, @10:48PM (#205879)

        Your post is kind of impossible to tell whether you're being sarcastic because 1) we don't know what country you're talking about, 2) all the rest of your statements aren't possible to analyze because of it, and 3) humor doesn't work with one undefined side either.

        --
        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
        • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Tuesday July 07 2015, @07:41AM

          by FatPhil (863) <reversethis-{if.fdsa} {ta} {tnelyos-cp}> on Tuesday July 07 2015, @07:41AM (#206020) Homepage
          Well, there's some sarcasm, certainly. I've got a naive positive outlook that the EU will learn from its repeated mistakes, so much so I've just bought a larger flat here. That's because my comments about Estonia were honest - and I'm happy to do my bit in the otherwise-fantasy trickle-down economy, to get my spending and my not-insignificant taxes lubricating the cogs. It's the country that's shaken off its Soviet history the most effectively - corruption (perception, as per CPI) is lowish, and dropping, and shaming is high when it's discovered.

          But I'm sure I could become as attached and loyal to another country, were the EU to piss me off enough. Alas, being an EU citizen in a Euro country, I do benefit greatly from those two things.
          --
          I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07 2015, @12:11AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07 2015, @12:11AM (#205913)

        Don't come to New Zealand. We're doing the same thing, but without the banks being involved: the government is selling off all our public assets and then bitching that we don't have any way to pay off the new debt they've run up (almost $100 billion, a record, up from under $20 billion in 2009, which also shows a record spend on their part).

        Funny, it's the right wing parties who claim to be fiscally responsible yet these guys run up absolutely epic debts every single time they get in, and they claim the left wing parties are unable to responsibly manage finances, yet they were the ones who paid down the debt.

    • (Score: 2) by Phoenix666 on Tuesday July 07 2015, @12:16AM

      by Phoenix666 (552) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday July 07 2015, @12:16AM (#205919) Journal

      Europe rejected it because Turks are muslims.

      --
      Washington DC delenda est.